Notice of Inventory Completion: Gregg County Historical Museum, Longview, TX, 40901-40904 [2012-16927]

Download as PDF srobinson on DSK4SPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 133 / Wednesday, July 11, 2012 / Notices Sometime between the mid-1950s and the mid-1960s, two unassociated funerary objects were removed from a burial at site MA (no trinomial has been assigned) in eastern Texas. The exact location of this site is not specified in notes or records of the collection, although it is believed to be located in Marion County. The unassociated funerary objects are ceramic vessels. The MA site dates to A.D. 1450–1680, the Late Caddo period. Sometime between the mid-1950s and the mid-1960s, two unassociated funerary objects were removed from burials at site DAR C (no trinomial has been assigned) in eastern Texas. The exact location of this site is not specified in notes or records of the collection, except it is believed to be located in Harrison County. The unassociated funerary objects are ceramic pipes. The DAR C site dates to A.D. 1450–1680, the Late Caddo period. Sometime between the mid-1950s and the mid-1960s, one unassociated funerary object was removed from burials at site GC (no trinomial has been assigned) in eastern Texas. The exact location of this site is not specified in notes or records of the collection, except it is believed to be located in Gregg County. The unassociated funerary object is a ceramic pipe. The GC site dates to A.D. 1450–1680, the Late Caddo period. Sometime between the mid-1950s and the mid-1960s, five unassociated funerary objects were removed from burials at site or sites labeled 1100 AD (no trinomial(s) have been assigned) in eastern Texas. The exact location of this site is not specified in notes or records of the collection. The unassociated funerary objects are ceramic pipes. The 1100 AD site(s) date to A.D. 1450–1680, the Late Caddo period. Sometime between the mid-1950s and the mid-1960s, two unassociated funerary objects were removed from burials at site or sites labeled 1500 AD (no trinomial(s) have been assigned) in eastern Texas. The exact location of this site is not specified in notes or records of the collection. The unassociated funerary objects are ceramic pipes. The 1500 AD site(s) date to A.D. 1450–1680, the Late Caddo period. Sometime between the mid-1950s and the mid-1960s, 275 unassociated funerary objects were removed from burials at unknown and unrecorded sites in eastern Texas. These unassociated funerary objects have no available provenience. The unassociated funerary objects are 1 lot of approximately 8,267 glass beads, 250 ceramic vessels, and 24 ceramic pipes. The lot of glass beads are believed to VerDate Mar<15>2010 18:11 Jul 10, 2012 Jkt 226001 have come from burials at seven Historic Caddo sites, including Ware Acres (41GG31), Kinsloe (41GG3), Cherokee Lake (41RK132), Millsey Williamson (41RK3), C. D. Marsh (41HS269), Susie Slade (41HS13), and Brown (41HS261) which were excavated by Jones for his 1968 Master of Arts thesis (Buddy Calvin Jones, ‘‘The Kinsloe Focus: A Study of Seven Historic Caddoan Sites in Northeast Texas,’’ Master of Arts thesis, Department of Anthropology, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK, 1968). The ceramic vessels and the ceramic pipes have no available provenience information, but are believed to date to A.D. 1450–1680, the Late Caddo period. The glass beads date from the late 17th century to the early 19th century, the Historic Caddo period. Determinations made by the Gregg County Historical Museum Officials of the Gregg County Historical Museum have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(B), the 1,431 cultural items described above as unassociated funerary objects are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony and are believed, by a preponderance of the evidence, to have been removed from specific burial sites of Native American individuals. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between cultural items and the Caddo Nation of Oklahoma. Additional Requestors and Disposition Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with these categories of funerary objects should contact Neina Kennedy, Executive Director, Gregg County Historical Museum, 214 N. Fredonia Street, Longview, TX 75601, telephone (903) 753–5840, before August 10, 2012. Repatriation of these unassociated funerary objects to the Caddo Nation of Oklahoma may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The Gregg County Historical Museum is responsible for notifying the Caddo Nation of Oklahoma that this notice has been published. Dated: June 7, 2012. David Tarler, Acting Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2012–16928 Filed 7–10–12; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–P PO 00000 Frm 00056 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 40901 DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–10538: 2200–1100– 665] Notice of Inventory Completion: Gregg County Historical Museum, Longview, TX National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The Gregg County Historical Museum has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribe and has determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and associated funerary objects and a present-day Indian tribe. Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary objects may contact the Gregg County Historical Museum. Repatriation of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Indian tribe stated below may occur if no additional claimants come forward. DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes it has a cultural affiliation with the human remains and associated funerary objects should contact the Gregg County Historical Museum at the address below by August 10, 2012. ADDRESSES: Neina Kennedy, Executive Director, Gregg County Historical Museum, 214 N. Fredonia Street, Longview, TX 75601, telephone (903) 753–5840. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects in the possession of the Gregg County Historical Museum in Longview, TX. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from a total of 16 archeological sites, including 13 sites located in Gregg, Harrison, Red River, Rusk and Upshur counties in Texas and three sites of unknown county location within eastern Texas. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\11JYN1.SGM 11JYN1 40902 Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 133 / Wednesday, July 11, 2012 / Notices The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. srobinson on DSK4SPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Consultation A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by physical anthropology consultants (Angela Tine, Geo-Marine, Inc., and Nikki Dixon, The University of Texas at Arlington) in 2010 and 2011, working with the curator of the Buddy Jones collection at the Gregg County Historical Museum. A detailed assessment of the associated funerary objects was made by the professional staff of Archeological & Environmental Consultants, LLC, in conjunction with the curator of the Buddy Jones collection at the Gregg County Historical Museum. Both assessments were made in consultation with representatives of the Caddo Nation of Oklahoma. History and Description of the Remains In 2002, the Buddy Calvin Jones collection, a privately-held collection of Native American human remains and artifacts, was donated to the Gregg County Historical Museum, Longview, TX. Buddy Calvin Jones was an avocational archeologist who later became a professional archeologist, and excavated numerous sites in eastern Texas. The collection contains human remains and associated funerary objects removed from a total of 16 archeological sites, including 13 sites located in Gregg, Harrison, Red River, Rusk and Upshur counties in Texas and three sites of unknown location within eastern Texas. In 1963, human remains representing, at minimum, five individuals were removed from three burials at site 41GG50, in Gregg County, TX. The human remains from Burial 1 include one possibly male adult, one adult of unknown sex, and one juvenile of unknown sex. The human remains from Burial 6 include an occipital cranial bone fragment of one adult of unknown sex. The human remains from Burial 7 include one adult of unknown sex. No known individuals were identified. The 11 associated funerary objects are 5 ceramic vessels from Burial 1; 4 ceramic vessels form Burial 6; and 2 ceramic vessels form Burial 7. The burials date to A.D. 1200–1400, the Middle Caddo period. In the late 1950s, human remains representing, at minimum, six individuals were removed from five burials at site 41HS269 (C.D. Marsh), in Harrison County, TX. The human remains from Burial 1 include two human molars of one individual of unknown age and sex. The human VerDate Mar<15>2010 18:11 Jul 10, 2012 Jkt 226001 remains from Burial 2 include one adult of unknown sex, and a human medial cuneiform and other bone fragments of one individual of unknown age and sex. The human remains from Burial 4 include a postcranial human bone from one adult of unknown sex. The human remains from Burial 6 include one child of unknown sex. The human remains from Burial 7 include one individual of unknown age and sex. No known individuals were identified. The eight associated funerary objects are four ceramic vessels from Burial 1; 1 lot of miscellaneous sherds from Burial 2; 1 lot of miscellaneous sherds from Burial 4; 1 lot of miscellaneous sherds and lithic debris from Burial 6; and 1 ceramic vessel form Burial 7. The burials rang in date from A.D. 1200– 1400, the Middle Caddo period, through the middle-to-late 18th century. Between December 1961 and January 1962, human remains representing, at minimum, two individuals were removed from one burial at site 41RR16 (Sam Kaufman), in Red River County, TX. The human remains from Burial 2 include one child of unknown sex and fragments of one adult, possibly middle aged and female. No known individuals were identified. The three associated funerary objects are ceramic vessels from Burial 2. The burial dates to A.D. 1500–1600, the Late Caddo period. In 1957, human remains representing, at minimum, 19 individuals were removed from 16 burials at site 41UR315 (Henry Spencer), in Upshur County, TX. The site was a large cemetery known to have more than 40 burials. The human remains from Burial 1 include one adult of unknown sex. The human remains from Burial 5 include 16 long bone fragments of one individual of unknown age and sex. The human remains from Burial 8 include bone and dental fragments of one adult of unknown age and sex. The human remains from Burial 9 (or 11) include teeth and cranial fragments of one individual. The human remains from Burial 10 include teeth and skull fragments of one adult of unknown sex. The human remains from Burial 13 include teeth and bone fragments of two children of unknown sex. The human remains from Burial 18 (or 28) were comingled and include bone fragments and teeth of one child. The human remains from Burial 21 include bone fragments of one child of unknown sex. The human remains from Burial 22 include teeth and bone fragments of one child of unknown sex and two adults of unknown sex. The human remains from Burial 27 include teeth and bone fragments of one adult of unknown sex. The human remains from Burial 31 PO 00000 Frm 00057 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 include bone fragments of one adult of unknown age and sex. The human remains from Burial 36 include a long bone of one adult of unknown sex. The human remains from an unnumbered burial (Lot 102) include one tooth, miscellaneous cranial fragments and miscellaneous postcranial fragments from one adult of unknown sex. The human remains from an unnumbered burial (Lot 145) include teeth and seven bone fragments of one individual of unknown age and sex. The human remains from an unnumbered burial (UC 31/Lot 151) include two teeth of one individual of unknown age and sex. The human remains from an unnumbered burial (Lot 129) include one adult of unknown sex. No known individuals were identified. The 62 associated funerary objects are 5 ceramic vessels from Burial 1; 6 ceramic vessels from Burial 5; 6 ceramic vessels from Burial 8; 2 ceramic vessels from Burial 9; 3 ceramic vessels from Burial 10; 3 ceramic vessels from Burial 13; 9 ceramic vessels from Burial 18; 1 ceramic vessel from Burial 21; 6 ceramic vessels and 2 ceramic elbow pipes from Burial 22; 6 ceramic vessels from Burial 27; 3 ceramic vessels from Burial 28; 2 ceramic vessels from Burial 31; 5 ceramic vessels from Burial 36; 1 ceramic vessel from an unnumbered burial (Lot 102); 1 lot of miscellaneous sherds from an unnumbered burial (UC 31/Lot 151); and 1 ceramic vessel from an unnumbered burial (Lot 129). The burials likely date to A.D. 1450–1650, the Late Caddo period. In 1954–1955, human remains representing, at minimum, three individuals were removed from three burials at site 41UR318 (Henry Williams), in Upshur County, TX. The site was a large cemetery known to have more than 36 burials. The human remains from Burial 17 include cranial bone fragments, a temporal bone, long bone fragments, burned bone fragments and a femur diaphysis of one individual of unknown age and sex. The human remains from an unnumbered burial (Lot 130) include bone and teeth of one adult of unknown sex. The human remains from an unnumbered burial (Lot 121) include bone fragments of one juvenile or adult of unknown sex. No known individuals were identified. The two associated funerary objects are a ceramic vessel from Burial 17 and 1 lot of miscellaneous sherds from an unnumbered burial (Lot 121). The burials date to A.D. 1500–1600, the Late Caddo period. In 1958, human remains representing, at minimum, three individuals were removed from three burials at site 41UR320 (Taft), in Upshur County, TX. E:\FR\FM\11JYN1.SGM 11JYN1 srobinson on DSK4SPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 133 / Wednesday, July 11, 2012 / Notices The site was a cemetery known to have six burials. The human remains from Burial 3 include molar crowns, incisor crowns and small bone fragments of one individual of unknown age and sex. The human remains from Burial 4 include bone and teeth fragments of one individual of unknown age and sex. The human remains from an unnumbered burial (Lot 150) include teeth and bone fragments of one individual of unknown age and sex. No known individuals were identified. The 15 associated funerary objects are 11 ceramic vessels from Burial 3, 3 ceramic vessels from Burial 4, and 1 plain vessel from the unnumbered burial (Lot 150). The burials date from the period A.D. 1500– 1600, the Late Caddo period. Sometime between the late 1950s and the mid-1960s, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from one burial at site GC 82 (on Hawkins Creek), in Gregg County, TX. The exact location of the burial is not specified in notes or records of the collection. The site was a cemetery known to have five burials. The human remains from Burial 5 include teeth, phalanges and bone fragments of one individual of unknown age and sex. No known individuals were identified. The one associated funerary object is a spool-necked bottle from Burial 5. The burial dates to A.D. 1500– 1600, the Late Caddo period. In June 1955, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from one burial at site 41GG51 (Hawkins Creek), in Gregg County, TX. The human remains from an unnumbered burial include mandible fragment and teeth of one juvenile of unknown sex. No known individuals were identified. The one associated funerary object is one lot of miscellaneous sherds. The burial dates to A.D. 1200–1400, the Middle Caddo period. Sometime between the mid-1950s and mid-1960s, human remains representing at minimum, one individual were removed from one burial at site GC 10 (near Grace Creek), in Gregg County, TX. The exact location of the burial is not specified in notes or records of the collection. The human remains from the unnumbered burial include a human molar of one individual of unknown age and sex. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. The burial dates to A.D. 1500–1600, the Late Caddo period. In 1956, human remains representing at minimum, one individual were removed from one burial at an unknown site (Lot 169), in Rusk County, TX. The exact location of the burial is not specified in notes or records of the VerDate Mar<15>2010 18:11 Jul 10, 2012 Jkt 226001 collection. The human remains from the unnumbered burial include a human tooth of one individual of unknown age and sex. No known individual was identified. The one associated funerary object is one lot of miscellaneous sherds. The burial dates to A.D. 1200– 1400, the Middle Caddo period. In 1956, human remains representing at minimum, one individual were removed from one burial (Lot 170), in Rusk County, TX. The exact location of the burial is not specified in notes or records of the collection. The human remains from the unnumbered burial include 5 molars, other tooth fragments, and 15 unspecified bone fragments of one individual of unknown age and sex. No known individual was identified. The one associated funerary object is one lot of miscellaneous sherds. The burial dates to A.D. 1200–1400, the Middle Caddo period. In 1959, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from one burial at site M–6 Plummer (in Little Cypress Creek basin), in Upshur County, TX. The exact location of the burial is not specified in notes or records of the collection. The human remains from the unnumbered burial include cranium fragments and teeth of one individual of unknown age and sex. No known individuals were identified. The six associated funerary objects are five ceramic bowls and one ceramic bottle. The burial dates to A.D. 1500–1600, the Late Caddo period. In 1954, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from one burial at site 41UR319 (Starr Mound), in Upshur County, TX. The human remains from an unnumbered burial include rib fragments, teeth, and unknown bone fragments of one individual of unknown age and sex. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. The burial dates to A.D. 1500–1600, the Late Caddo period. Sometime between the mid-1950s and mid-1960s, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from one burial at site TAS–C (in the Sabine River basin), in eastern Texas. The exact location of the burial is not specified in notes or records of the collection. The human remains from the unnumbered burial include a tooth of one adult of unknown sex. No known individuals were identified. The one associated funerary object is a ceramic vessel. The burial dates to A.D. 1500–1600, the Late Caddo period. At an unknown date between the mid1950s and mid-1960s, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from one PO 00000 Frm 00058 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 40903 burial (Burial 36, Lot 134), in eastern Texas. The exact location of the burial is not specified in notes or records of the collection. The human remains from Burial 36, Lot 134 include teeth from one adolescent of unknown sex. No known individuals were identified. The three associated funerary objects are ceramic bowls. The burial dates to A.D. 1430–1680, the Late Caddo period. Sometime between the mid-1950s and mid-1960s, human remains representing, at minimum, four individuals were removed from four unnumbered burials in eastern Texas. The exact location of the burials is not specified in notes or records of the collection. The human remains from an unnumbered burial (Lot 133) include bone of one subadult of unknown age and sex. No known individuals were identified. The one associated funerary object is an engraved bowl. The burial dates to A.D. 1430–1680, the Late Caddo period. The human remains from an unnumbered burial (Lot 116) include mandibular and molar fragments of one individual of unknown age and sex. No known individual was identified. The one associated funerary object is a brushed punctuated jar. The burial dates to A.D. 1430–1680, the Late Caddo period. The human remains from an unnumbered burial (Lot 160) include teeth and cranial fragments of one individual of unknown age and sex. No known individual was identified. The one associated funerary object is a brushed punctuated jar. The burial dates to A.D. 1500–1600, the Late Caddo period. The human remains from an unnumbered burial (Lot 167) include a human premolar, an unspecified rib fragment, and other unspecified bone fragments of one individual of unknown age and sex. No known individual was identified. The one associated funerary object is 1 lot of miscellaneous sherds. The burial dates to A.D. 1200–1400, the Middle Caddo period. The human remains and associated funerary objects described above are affiliated with the Caddo Nation of Oklahoma based on geographical and archeological evidence. Eastern Texas is part of the traditional homelands of the Caddo Nation of Oklahoma, based on over 100 years of archeological findings, historical and ethnographic records and documents that date as early as 1540, and the cultural traditions of the Caddo peoples themselves. Many of the burial positions-in rows with the body of the individual laid on an east-west axis and the head facing west-are consistent with Caddo burials in this part of eastern Texas. The associated funerary objects also suggest Caddo origins, based on the characteristic forms, methods of E:\FR\FM\11JYN1.SGM 11JYN1 40904 Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 133 / Wednesday, July 11, 2012 / Notices manufacture and decoration styles that are distinctly Eastern Texas Caddo. Determinations Made by the Gregg County Historical Museum Officials of the Gregg County Historical Museum have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of 51 individuals of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 119 funerary objects described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and the Caddo Nation of Oklahoma. Additional Requestors and Disposition Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary objects should contact Neina Kennedy, Executive Director, Gregg County Historical Museum, 214 N. Fredonia Street, Longview, TX 75601, telephone (903) 753–5840, before August 10, 2012. Repatriation of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Caddo Nation of Oklahoma may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The Gregg County Historical Museum is responsible for notifying the Caddo Nation of Oklahoma that this notice has been published. Dated: June 7, 2012. David Tarler, Acting Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2012–16927 Filed 7–10–12; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Office of Natural Resources Revenue srobinson on DSK4SPTVN1PROD with NOTICES [Docket No. ONRR–2011–0025] Agency Information Collection Activities: Submitted for Office of Management and Budget Review; Comment Request Office of Natural Resources Revenue, Interior. ACTION: Notice of an extension of a currently approved information collection. AGENCY: VerDate Mar<15>2010 18:11 Jul 10, 2012 Jkt 226001 To comply with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (PRA), the Office of Natural Resources Revenue (ONRR) is notifying the public that we have submitted to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) an information collection request (ICR) to renew approval of the paperwork requirements in the regulations under 30 CFR parts 1227, 1228, and 1229. This notice also provides the public with a second opportunity to comment on the paperwork burden of these regulatory requirements. DATES: Submit written comments on or before August 10, 2012. ADDRESSES: Submit written comments by either FAX (202) 395–5806 or email (OIRA_Docket@omb.eop.gov) directly to the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, OMB, Attention: Desk Officer for the Department of the Interior (OMB Control Number 1012–0003). Please also submit a copy of your comments to ONRR by one of the following methods: • Electronically go to http:// www.regulations.gov. In the entry titled ‘‘Enter Keyword or ID,’’ enter ONRR– 2011–0025, and then click search. Follow the instructions to submit public comments. We will post all comments. • Mail comments to Stephen Chubb, Regulatory Specialist, Office of Natural Resources Revenue, P.O. Box 25165, MS 64000A, Denver, Colorado 80225. Please reference ICR 1012–0003 in your comments. • Hand-carry comments or use an overnight courier service. Our courier address is Building 85, Room A–614, Denver Federal Center, West 6th Ave. and Kipling St., Denver, Colorado 80225. Please reference ICR 1012–0003 in your comments. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Stephen Chubb, email stephen.chubb@onrr.gov. You may also contact Stephen Chubb to obtain copies, at no cost, of (1) the ICR, (2) any associated forms, and (3) the regulations that require the subject collection of information. You may also review the ICR online at http://www.reginfo.gov/ public/do/PRAMain. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: 30 CFR Parts 1227, 1228, and 1229, Delegated and Cooperative Activities with States and Indian Tribes. OMB Control Number: 1012–0003. Bureau Form Numbers: None. Abstract: The Secretary of the U.S. Department of the Interior is responsible for mineral resource development on Federal and Indian lands and the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS). The Secretary’s responsibility, according to various laws, is to manage mineral resource SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00059 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 production from Federal and Indian lands and the OCS, collect the royalties and other mineral revenues due, and distribute the funds collected in accordance with applicable laws. The Secretary also has a trust responsibility to manage Indian lands and seek advice and information from Indian beneficiaries. ONRR performs the minerals revenue management functions for the Secretary and assists the Secretary in carrying out the Department’s trust responsibility for Indian lands. Public laws pertaining to mineral leases on Federal and Indian lands are available at http:// www.onrr.gov/Laws_R_D/ PublicLawsAMR.htm. When a company or an individual enters into a lease to explore, develop, produce, and dispose of minerals from Federal or Indian lands, that company or individual agrees to pay the lessor a share in an amount or value of production from the leased lands. The lessee, or the designee, must report various kinds of information to the lessor relative to the disposition of the leased minerals. Such information is generally available within the records of the lessee or others involved in developing, transporting, processing, purchasing, or selling of such minerals. The information that ONRR collects includes data necessary to ensure that the lessee accurately values and appropriately pays all royalties and other mineral revenues due. The Federal Oil and Gas Royalty Management Act of 1982 (FOGRMA), which the Federal Oil and Gas Royalty Simplification and Fairness Act of 1996 amended, authorizes the Secretary to develop delegated and cooperative agreements with States (30 U.S.C 1735, sect. 205) and Indian Tribes (30 U.S.C. 1732, sect. 202) to carry out certain inspection, auditing, investigation, or limited enforcement activities for oil and gas leases in their jurisdiction. The States and Indian Tribes are working partners and are an integral part of the overall onshore and offshore compliance effort. The Appropriations Act of 1992 also authorizes the States and Tribes to perform the same functions for coal and other solid mineral leases. This collection of information is necessary in order for States and Tribes to conduct audits and related investigations of Federal and Indian oil, gas, coal, any other solid minerals, and geothermal royalty revenues from Federal and tribal leased lands. Relevant parts of the regulations include 30 CFR parts 1227, 1228, and 1229, as described below: E:\FR\FM\11JYN1.SGM 11JYN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 77, Number 133 (Wednesday, July 11, 2012)]
[Notices]
[Pages 40901-40904]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2012-16927]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-10538: 2200-1100-665]


Notice of Inventory Completion: Gregg County Historical Museum, 
Longview, TX

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The Gregg County Historical Museum has completed an inventory 
of human remains and associated funerary objects in consultation with 
the appropriate Indian tribe and has determined that there is a 
cultural affiliation between the human remains and associated funerary 
objects and a present-day Indian tribe. Representatives of any Indian 
tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human 
remains and associated funerary objects may contact the Gregg County 
Historical Museum. Repatriation of the human remains and associated 
funerary objects to the Indian tribe stated below may occur if no 
additional claimants come forward.

DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes it has a 
cultural affiliation with the human remains and associated funerary 
objects should contact the Gregg County Historical Museum at the 
address below by August 10, 2012.

ADDRESSES: Neina Kennedy, Executive Director, Gregg County Historical 
Museum, 214 N. Fredonia Street, Longview, TX 75601, telephone (903) 
753-5840.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and 
associated funerary objects in the possession of the Gregg County 
Historical Museum in Longview, TX. The human remains and associated 
funerary objects were removed from a total of 16 archeological sites, 
including 13 sites located in Gregg, Harrison, Red River, Rusk and 
Upshur counties in Texas and three sites of unknown county location 
within eastern Texas.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The 
determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains and associated funerary objects.

[[Page 40902]]

The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in 
this notice.

Consultation

    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by physical 
anthropology consultants (Angela Tine, Geo-Marine, Inc., and Nikki 
Dixon, The University of Texas at Arlington) in 2010 and 2011, working 
with the curator of the Buddy Jones collection at the Gregg County 
Historical Museum. A detailed assessment of the associated funerary 
objects was made by the professional staff of Archeological & 
Environmental Consultants, LLC, in conjunction with the curator of the 
Buddy Jones collection at the Gregg County Historical Museum. Both 
assessments were made in consultation with representatives of the Caddo 
Nation of Oklahoma.

History and Description of the Remains

    In 2002, the Buddy Calvin Jones collection, a privately-held 
collection of Native American human remains and artifacts, was donated 
to the Gregg County Historical Museum, Longview, TX. Buddy Calvin Jones 
was an avocational archeologist who later became a professional 
archeologist, and excavated numerous sites in eastern Texas. The 
collection contains human remains and associated funerary objects 
removed from a total of 16 archeological sites, including 13 sites 
located in Gregg, Harrison, Red River, Rusk and Upshur counties in 
Texas and three sites of unknown location within eastern Texas.
    In 1963, human remains representing, at minimum, five individuals 
were removed from three burials at site 41GG50, in Gregg County, TX. 
The human remains from Burial 1 include one possibly male adult, one 
adult of unknown sex, and one juvenile of unknown sex. The human 
remains from Burial 6 include an occipital cranial bone fragment of one 
adult of unknown sex. The human remains from Burial 7 include one adult 
of unknown sex. No known individuals were identified. The 11 associated 
funerary objects are 5 ceramic vessels from Burial 1; 4 ceramic vessels 
form Burial 6; and 2 ceramic vessels form Burial 7. The burials date to 
A.D. 1200-1400, the Middle Caddo period.
    In the late 1950s, human remains representing, at minimum, six 
individuals were removed from five burials at site 41HS269 (C.D. 
Marsh), in Harrison County, TX. The human remains from Burial 1 include 
two human molars of one individual of unknown age and sex. The human 
remains from Burial 2 include one adult of unknown sex, and a human 
medial cuneiform and other bone fragments of one individual of unknown 
age and sex. The human remains from Burial 4 include a postcranial 
human bone from one adult of unknown sex. The human remains from Burial 
6 include one child of unknown sex. The human remains from Burial 7 
include one individual of unknown age and sex. No known individuals 
were identified. The eight associated funerary objects are four ceramic 
vessels from Burial 1; 1 lot of miscellaneous sherds from Burial 2; 1 
lot of miscellaneous sherds from Burial 4; 1 lot of miscellaneous 
sherds and lithic debris from Burial 6; and 1 ceramic vessel form 
Burial 7. The burials rang in date from A.D. 1200-1400, the Middle 
Caddo period, through the middle-to-late 18th century.
    Between December 1961 and January 1962, human remains representing, 
at minimum, two individuals were removed from one burial at site 41RR16 
(Sam Kaufman), in Red River County, TX. The human remains from Burial 2 
include one child of unknown sex and fragments of one adult, possibly 
middle aged and female. No known individuals were identified. The three 
associated funerary objects are ceramic vessels from Burial 2. The 
burial dates to A.D. 1500-1600, the Late Caddo period.
    In 1957, human remains representing, at minimum, 19 individuals 
were removed from 16 burials at site 41UR315 (Henry Spencer), in Upshur 
County, TX. The site was a large cemetery known to have more than 40 
burials. The human remains from Burial 1 include one adult of unknown 
sex. The human remains from Burial 5 include 16 long bone fragments of 
one individual of unknown age and sex. The human remains from Burial 8 
include bone and dental fragments of one adult of unknown age and sex. 
The human remains from Burial 9 (or 11) include teeth and cranial 
fragments of one individual. The human remains from Burial 10 include 
teeth and skull fragments of one adult of unknown sex. The human 
remains from Burial 13 include teeth and bone fragments of two children 
of unknown sex. The human remains from Burial 18 (or 28) were comingled 
and include bone fragments and teeth of one child. The human remains 
from Burial 21 include bone fragments of one child of unknown sex. The 
human remains from Burial 22 include teeth and bone fragments of one 
child of unknown sex and two adults of unknown sex. The human remains 
from Burial 27 include teeth and bone fragments of one adult of unknown 
sex. The human remains from Burial 31 include bone fragments of one 
adult of unknown age and sex. The human remains from Burial 36 include 
a long bone of one adult of unknown sex. The human remains from an 
unnumbered burial (Lot 102) include one tooth, miscellaneous cranial 
fragments and miscellaneous postcranial fragments from one adult of 
unknown sex. The human remains from an unnumbered burial (Lot 145) 
include teeth and seven bone fragments of one individual of unknown age 
and sex. The human remains from an unnumbered burial (UC 31/Lot 151) 
include two teeth of one individual of unknown age and sex. The human 
remains from an unnumbered burial (Lot 129) include one adult of 
unknown sex. No known individuals were identified. The 62 associated 
funerary objects are 5 ceramic vessels from Burial 1; 6 ceramic vessels 
from Burial 5; 6 ceramic vessels from Burial 8; 2 ceramic vessels from 
Burial 9; 3 ceramic vessels from Burial 10; 3 ceramic vessels from 
Burial 13; 9 ceramic vessels from Burial 18; 1 ceramic vessel from 
Burial 21; 6 ceramic vessels and 2 ceramic elbow pipes from Burial 22; 
6 ceramic vessels from Burial 27; 3 ceramic vessels from Burial 28; 2 
ceramic vessels from Burial 31; 5 ceramic vessels from Burial 36; 1 
ceramic vessel from an unnumbered burial (Lot 102); 1 lot of 
miscellaneous sherds from an unnumbered burial (UC 31/Lot 151); and 1 
ceramic vessel from an unnumbered burial (Lot 129). The burials likely 
date to A.D. 1450-1650, the Late Caddo period.
    In 1954-1955, human remains representing, at minimum, three 
individuals were removed from three burials at site 41UR318 (Henry 
Williams), in Upshur County, TX. The site was a large cemetery known to 
have more than 36 burials. The human remains from Burial 17 include 
cranial bone fragments, a temporal bone, long bone fragments, burned 
bone fragments and a femur diaphysis of one individual of unknown age 
and sex. The human remains from an unnumbered burial (Lot 130) include 
bone and teeth of one adult of unknown sex. The human remains from an 
unnumbered burial (Lot 121) include bone fragments of one juvenile or 
adult of unknown sex. No known individuals were identified. The two 
associated funerary objects are a ceramic vessel from Burial 17 and 1 
lot of miscellaneous sherds from an unnumbered burial (Lot 121). The 
burials date to A.D. 1500-1600, the Late Caddo period.
    In 1958, human remains representing, at minimum, three individuals 
were removed from three burials at site 41UR320 (Taft), in Upshur 
County, TX.

[[Page 40903]]

The site was a cemetery known to have six burials. The human remains 
from Burial 3 include molar crowns, incisor crowns and small bone 
fragments of one individual of unknown age and sex. The human remains 
from Burial 4 include bone and teeth fragments of one individual of 
unknown age and sex. The human remains from an unnumbered burial (Lot 
150) include teeth and bone fragments of one individual of unknown age 
and sex. No known individuals were identified. The 15 associated 
funerary objects are 11 ceramic vessels from Burial 3, 3 ceramic 
vessels from Burial 4, and 1 plain vessel from the unnumbered burial 
(Lot 150). The burials date from the period A.D. 1500-1600, the Late 
Caddo period.
    Sometime between the late 1950s and the mid-1960s, human remains 
representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from one burial 
at site GC 82 (on Hawkins Creek), in Gregg County, TX. The exact 
location of the burial is not specified in notes or records of the 
collection. The site was a cemetery known to have five burials. The 
human remains from Burial 5 include teeth, phalanges and bone fragments 
of one individual of unknown age and sex. No known individuals were 
identified. The one associated funerary object is a spool-necked bottle 
from Burial 5. The burial dates to A.D. 1500-1600, the Late Caddo 
period.
    In June 1955, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were removed from one burial at site 41GG51 (Hawkins Creek), 
in Gregg County, TX. The human remains from an unnumbered burial 
include mandible fragment and teeth of one juvenile of unknown sex. No 
known individuals were identified. The one associated funerary object 
is one lot of miscellaneous sherds. The burial dates to A.D. 1200-1400, 
the Middle Caddo period.
    Sometime between the mid-1950s and mid-1960s, human remains 
representing at minimum, one individual were removed from one burial at 
site GC 10 (near Grace Creek), in Gregg County, TX. The exact location 
of the burial is not specified in notes or records of the collection. 
The human remains from the unnumbered burial include a human molar of 
one individual of unknown age and sex. No known individual was 
identified. No associated funerary objects are present. The burial 
dates to A.D. 1500-1600, the Late Caddo period.
    In 1956, human remains representing at minimum, one individual were 
removed from one burial at an unknown site (Lot 169), in Rusk County, 
TX. The exact location of the burial is not specified in notes or 
records of the collection. The human remains from the unnumbered burial 
include a human tooth of one individual of unknown age and sex. No 
known individual was identified. The one associated funerary object is 
one lot of miscellaneous sherds. The burial dates to A.D. 1200-1400, 
the Middle Caddo period.
    In 1956, human remains representing at minimum, one individual were 
removed from one burial (Lot 170), in Rusk County, TX. The exact 
location of the burial is not specified in notes or records of the 
collection. The human remains from the unnumbered burial include 5 
molars, other tooth fragments, and 15 unspecified bone fragments of one 
individual of unknown age and sex. No known individual was identified. 
The one associated funerary object is one lot of miscellaneous sherds. 
The burial dates to A.D. 1200-1400, the Middle Caddo period.
    In 1959, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were removed from one burial at site M-6 Plummer (in Little Cypress 
Creek basin), in Upshur County, TX. The exact location of the burial is 
not specified in notes or records of the collection. The human remains 
from the unnumbered burial include cranium fragments and teeth of one 
individual of unknown age and sex. No known individuals were 
identified. The six associated funerary objects are five ceramic bowls 
and one ceramic bottle. The burial dates to A.D. 1500-1600, the Late 
Caddo period.
    In 1954, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual 
were removed from one burial at site 41UR319 (Starr Mound), in Upshur 
County, TX. The human remains from an unnumbered burial include rib 
fragments, teeth, and unknown bone fragments of one individual of 
unknown age and sex. No known individuals were identified. No 
associated funerary objects are present. The burial dates to A.D. 1500-
1600, the Late Caddo period.
    Sometime between the mid-1950s and mid-1960s, human remains 
representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from one burial 
at site TAS-C (in the Sabine River basin), in eastern Texas. The exact 
location of the burial is not specified in notes or records of the 
collection. The human remains from the unnumbered burial include a 
tooth of one adult of unknown sex. No known individuals were 
identified. The one associated funerary object is a ceramic vessel. The 
burial dates to A.D. 1500-1600, the Late Caddo period.
    At an unknown date between the mid-1950s and mid-1960s, human 
remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from one 
burial (Burial 36, Lot 134), in eastern Texas. The exact location of 
the burial is not specified in notes or records of the collection. The 
human remains from Burial 36, Lot 134 include teeth from one adolescent 
of unknown sex. No known individuals were identified. The three 
associated funerary objects are ceramic bowls. The burial dates to A.D. 
1430-1680, the Late Caddo period.
    Sometime between the mid-1950s and mid-1960s, human remains 
representing, at minimum, four individuals were removed from four 
unnumbered burials in eastern Texas. The exact location of the burials 
is not specified in notes or records of the collection. The human 
remains from an unnumbered burial (Lot 133) include bone of one 
subadult of unknown age and sex. No known individuals were identified. 
The one associated funerary object is an engraved bowl. The burial 
dates to A.D. 1430-1680, the Late Caddo period. The human remains from 
an unnumbered burial (Lot 116) include mandibular and molar fragments 
of one individual of unknown age and sex. No known individual was 
identified. The one associated funerary object is a brushed punctuated 
jar. The burial dates to A.D. 1430-1680, the Late Caddo period. The 
human remains from an unnumbered burial (Lot 160) include teeth and 
cranial fragments of one individual of unknown age and sex. No known 
individual was identified. The one associated funerary object is a 
brushed punctuated jar. The burial dates to A.D. 1500-1600, the Late 
Caddo period. The human remains from an unnumbered burial (Lot 167) 
include a human premolar, an unspecified rib fragment, and other 
unspecified bone fragments of one individual of unknown age and sex. No 
known individual was identified. The one associated funerary object is 
1 lot of miscellaneous sherds. The burial dates to A.D. 1200-1400, the 
Middle Caddo period.
    The human remains and associated funerary objects described above 
are affiliated with the Caddo Nation of Oklahoma based on geographical 
and archeological evidence. Eastern Texas is part of the traditional 
homelands of the Caddo Nation of Oklahoma, based on over 100 years of 
archeological findings, historical and ethnographic records and 
documents that date as early as 1540, and the cultural traditions of 
the Caddo peoples themselves. Many of the burial positions-in rows with 
the body of the individual laid on an east-west axis and the head 
facing west-are consistent with Caddo burials in this part of eastern 
Texas. The associated funerary objects also suggest Caddo origins, 
based on the characteristic forms, methods of

[[Page 40904]]

manufacture and decoration styles that are distinctly Eastern Texas 
Caddo.

Determinations Made by the Gregg County Historical Museum

    Officials of the Gregg County Historical Museum have determined 
that:
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described 
above represent the physical remains of 51 individuals of Native 
American ancestry.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 119 funerary objects 
described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or 
near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of 
the death rite or ceremony.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of 
shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native 
American human remains and associated funerary objects and the Caddo 
Nation of Oklahoma.

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes itself to be 
culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary 
objects should contact Neina Kennedy, Executive Director, Gregg County 
Historical Museum, 214 N. Fredonia Street, Longview, TX 75601, 
telephone (903) 753-5840, before August 10, 2012. Repatriation of the 
human remains and associated funerary objects to the Caddo Nation of 
Oklahoma may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come 
forward.
    The Gregg County Historical Museum is responsible for notifying the 
Caddo Nation of Oklahoma that this notice has been published.

    Dated: June 7, 2012.
David Tarler,
Acting Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2012-16927 Filed 7-10-12; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-P