Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: San Diego Museum of Man, San Diego, CA, 34984-34985 [2012-14299]

Download as PDF 34984 Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 113 / Tuesday, June 12, 2012 / Notices North, Range 1 East, of the Indian Meridian, accepted April 12, 2012, for Group 211 OK. The plat, representing the dependent resurvey and survey in Township 15 North, Range 24 East, of the Indian Meridian, accepted April 12, 2012, for Group 207 OK. The plat, in six sheets, representing the dependent resurvey and survey in Township 13 North, Range 19 East, of the Indian Meridian, accepted April 20, 2012, for Group 67 OK. New Mexico Principal Meridian, New Mexico (NM) srobinson on DSK4SPTVN1PROD with NOTICES The plat, representing the dependent resurvey and survey in Townships 23 and 24 South, Range 19 East, of the New Mexico Principal Meridian, accepted April 26, 2012, for Group 1136 NM. The plat, in two sheets, representing the dependent resurvey and survey, in Township 16 North, Range 18 West, of the New Mexico Principal Meridian, accepted April 30, 2012, for Group 1107 NM. These plats are to be scheduled for official filing 30 days from the notice of publication in the Federal Register, as provided for in the BLM Manual Section 2097—Opening Orders. Notice from this office will be provided as to the date of said publication. If a protest against a survey, in accordance with 43 CFR 4.450–2, of the above plats is received prior to the date of official filing, the filing will be stayed pending consideration of the protest. A plat will not be officially filed until the day after all protests have been dismissed and become final or appeals from the dismissal affirmed. A person or party who wishes to protest against any of these surveys must file a written protest with the Bureau of Land Management New Mexico State Director stating that they wish to protest. A statement of reasons for a protest may be filed with the Notice of protest to the State Director or the statement of reasons must be filed with the State Director within thirty (30) days after the protest is filed. Stephen W. Beyerlein, Acting, Deputy State Director, Cadastral Survey/GeoSciences. [FR Doc. 2012–14218 Filed 6–11–12; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4310–FB–P VerDate Mar<15>2010 22:42 Jun 11, 2012 Jkt 226001 DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–10345; 2200–1100– 665] Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: San Diego Museum of Man, San Diego, CA National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The San Diego Museum of Man, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes, has determined that a cultural item meets the definition of unassociated funerary object and repatriation to the Indian tribes stated below may occur if no additional claimants come forward. Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the cultural item may contact the San Diego Museum of Man. DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes it has a cultural affiliation with the cultural item should contact the San Diego Museum of Man at the address below by July 12, 2012. ADDRESSES: Philip Hoog, San Diego Museum of Man, San Diego, CA 92101, telephone (619) 239–2001, extension 43. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate a cultural item in the possession of the San Diego Museum of Man, San Diego, CA, that meets the definition of unassociated funerary object under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American cultural item. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. SUMMARY: History and Description of the Cultural Item In 1929, one clay pipe (or bow pipe), about five inches in total length, was removed from archeological site SDM– W–1 (as named by archeologist Malcolm Rogers), also known as CA–SDI–39, generally referred to as the Spindrift site, located near the coast of the Pacific Ocean in present day La Jolla, CA. The pottery pipe is a bow-type with a beakshaped holder and has diamond hatching incised about the bowl. It has a charred appearance, suggesting that it PO 00000 Frm 00052 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 was burned. Shortly after its excavation, Malcolm Rogers transferred the clay pipe to the San Diego Museum of Man, where he was employed at the time. Malcolm Rogers’s 1929 excavation notes state that the pipe was discovered with one associated cremation, however, the cremated human remains do not reside at the Museum of Man. Kumeyaay tradition, confirmed through consultation with Kumeyaay representatives, also dictates that charred objects, such as this pipe, were part of burial offerings and were most likely associated to cremated human remains, most likely a male. Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(B), the pipe is considered an unassociated funerary object. Clay pipes such as this one typically do not make an appearance in the archeological record until after A.D. 1000. Archeological evidence and Kumeyaay tradition both suggest that the present-day Kumeyaay people of Southern California occupied the area where the pipe was discovered during this period. Determinations Made by the San Diego Museum of Man Officials of the San Diego Museum of Man have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(B), the one cultural item described above is reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony and is believed, by a preponderance of the evidence, to have been removed from a specific burial site of a Native American individual. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the clay pipe and the Kumeyaay Nation, as represented by the Barona Group of Capitan Grande Band of Mission Indians of the Barona Reservation, California; Campo Band of Diegueno Mission Indians of the Campo Indian Reservation, California; Ewiiaapaayp Band of Kumeyaay Indians, California; Iipay Nation of Santa Ysabel, California (formerly the Santa Ysabel Band of Diegueno Mission Indians of the Santa Ysabel Reservation); Inaja Band of Diegueno Mission Indians of the Inaja and Cosmit Reservation, California; Jamul Indian Village of California; La Posta Band of Diegueno Mission Indians of the La Posta Indian Reservation, California; Manzanita Band of Diegueno Mission Indians of the Manzanita Reservation, California; Mesa Grande Band of Diegueno Mission Indians of the Mesa Grande Reservation, California; San Pasqual Band of Diegueno Mission E:\FR\FM\12JNN1.SGM 12JNN1 Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 113 / Tuesday, June 12, 2012 / Notices Indians of California; Sycuan Band of the Kumeyaay Nation; and Viejas (Baron Long) Group of Capitan Grande Band of Mission Indians of the Viejas Reservation, California (hereafter referred to as ‘‘The Tribes’’). Additional Requestors and Disposition Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the unassociated funerary object should contact Philip Hoog, San Diego Museum of Man, 1350 El Prado, San Diego, CA 92101, telephone (619) 239–2001, ext. 43 before July 12, 2012. Repatriation of the unassociated funerary object to the Kumeyaay Nation, as represented by The Tribes may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The San Diego Museum of Man is responsible for notifying the Kumeyaay Nation, as represented by The Tribes that this notice has been published. Dated: June 7, 2012. David Tarler, Acting Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2012–14299 Filed 6–11–12; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NAGPRA–10363; 2200–1100– 665] Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Indian Affairs, Washington, DC, and Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Indian Affairs, and Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes, have determined that the cultural items meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects and repatriation to the Indian tribes stated below may occur if no additional claimants come forward. Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the cultural items may contact the Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona. srobinson on DSK4SPTVN1PROD with NOTICES SUMMARY: Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes it has a cultural affiliation with the cultural items should contact the Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona at the address below by July 12, 2012. DATES: VerDate Mar<15>2010 22:42 Jun 11, 2012 Jkt 226001 John McClelland, NAGPRA Coordinator, Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona, P.O. Box 210026, Tucson, AZ 85721; telephone (520) 626– 2950. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate cultural items under the control of the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Indian Affairs, Washington, DC, and in the physical custody of the Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, that meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American cultural items. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. ADDRESSES: History and Description of the Cultural Items In 1934, cultural items were removed from the Snaketown site (AZ U:13:1 (ASM)), on the Gila River Indian Reservation, Pinal County, AZ, during archeological excavations conducted by the Gila Pueblo Foundation of Arizona. In December, 1950, the Gila Pueblo Foundation closed and the collections were donated to the Arizona State Museum. Additional cultural items were removed from the same site in 1964–1965 during legally authorized excavations conducted by the University of Arizona under the direction of Emil Haury. Collections obtained during the University of Arizona excavations were accessioned by the Arizona State Museum at the conclusion of the project. The items were reportedly found in association with human burials, but the human remains are not present in the collections. The 30 unassociated funerary objects are 1 ceramic plate, 1 ceramic vessel leg, 27 ceramic sherds, and 1 chipped stone artifact. Other unassociated funerary objects from this site were published in Notices of Intent to Repatriate in the Federal Register (66 FR 15741–15742, March 20, 2001; 69 FR 76779–76780, December 22, 2004; and 71 FR 13164–13165, March 14, 2006). The archeological evidence, including characteristics of portable material culture, attributes of ceramic styles, domestic and ritual architecture, site organization, and canal-based agriculture of the settlement places the PO 00000 Frm 00053 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 34985 Snaketown site within the archeologically-defined Hohokam tradition, and within the Phoenix Basin local variant of that tradition. The occupation of the Snaketown site spans the years circa A.D. 500/700–1100/1150. Continuities of mortuary practices, ethnographic materials, and technology indicate affiliation of Hohokam settlements with present-day O’odham (Piman) and Puebloan cultures. Documentation submitted by representatives of the Gila River Indian Community of the Gila River Indian Reservation, Arizona, on April 13, 2011, addresses continuities between the Hohokam and the O’odham tribes. Furthermore, oral traditions that are documented for the Ak Chin Indian Community of the Maricopa (Ak Chin) Indian Reservation, Arizona; Gila River Indian Community of the Gila River Indian Reservation, Arizona; Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community of the Salt River Reservation, Arizona; and the Tohono O’odham Nation of Arizona support affiliation with Hohokam sites in central Arizona. Determinations Made by the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Indian Affairs, Washington, DC, and the Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ Officials of the Bureau of Indian Affairs and the Arizona State Museum have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(B), the 30 cultural items described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony and are believed, by a preponderance of the evidence, to have been removed from a specific burial site of a Native American individual. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the unassociated funerary objects and the Ak Chin Indian Community of the Maricopa (Ak Chin) Indian Reservation, Arizona; Gila River Indian Community of the Gila River Indian Reservation, Arizona; Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community of the Salt River Reservation, Arizona; and Tohono O’odham Nation of Arizona. Additional Requestors and Disposition Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the unassociated funerary objects should contact John McClelland, NAGPRA Coordinator, Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona, P.O. E:\FR\FM\12JNN1.SGM 12JNN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 77, Number 113 (Tuesday, June 12, 2012)]
[Notices]
[Pages 34984-34985]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2012-14299]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[NPS-WASO-NAGPRA-10345; 2200-1100-665]


Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: San Diego Museum 
of Man, San Diego, CA

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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SUMMARY: The San Diego Museum of Man, in consultation with the 
appropriate Indian tribes, has determined that a cultural item meets 
the definition of unassociated funerary object and repatriation to the 
Indian tribes stated below may occur if no additional claimants come 
forward. Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes itself to be 
culturally affiliated with the cultural item may contact the San Diego 
Museum of Man.

DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes it has a 
cultural affiliation with the cultural item should contact the San 
Diego Museum of Man at the address below by July 12, 2012.

ADDRESSES: Philip Hoog, San Diego Museum of Man, San Diego, CA 92101, 
telephone (619) 239-2001, extension 43.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate a cultural item in the 
possession of the San Diego Museum of Man, San Diego, CA, that meets 
the definition of unassociated funerary object under 25 U.S.C. 3001.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The 
determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American cultural item. The National Park Service is not responsible 
for the determinations in this notice.

History and Description of the Cultural Item

    In 1929, one clay pipe (or bow pipe), about five inches in total 
length, was removed from archeological site SDM-W-1 (as named by 
archeologist Malcolm Rogers), also known as CA-SDI-39, generally 
referred to as the Spindrift site, located near the coast of the 
Pacific Ocean in present day La Jolla, CA. The pottery pipe is a bow-
type with a beak-shaped holder and has diamond hatching incised about 
the bowl. It has a charred appearance, suggesting that it was burned. 
Shortly after its excavation, Malcolm Rogers transferred the clay pipe 
to the San Diego Museum of Man, where he was employed at the time.
    Malcolm Rogers's 1929 excavation notes state that the pipe was 
discovered with one associated cremation, however, the cremated human 
remains do not reside at the Museum of Man. Kumeyaay tradition, 
confirmed through consultation with Kumeyaay representatives, also 
dictates that charred objects, such as this pipe, were part of burial 
offerings and were most likely associated to cremated human remains, 
most likely a male. Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(B), the pipe is 
considered an unassociated funerary object. Clay pipes such as this one 
typically do not make an appearance in the archeological record until 
after A.D. 1000. Archeological evidence and Kumeyaay tradition both 
suggest that the present-day Kumeyaay people of Southern California 
occupied the area where the pipe was discovered during this period.

Determinations Made by the San Diego Museum of Man

    Officials of the San Diego Museum of Man have determined that:
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(B), the one cultural item 
described above is reasonably believed to have been placed with or near 
individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the 
death rite or ceremony and is believed, by a preponderance of the 
evidence, to have been removed from a specific burial site of a Native 
American individual.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of 
shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the clay 
pipe and the Kumeyaay Nation, as represented by the Barona Group of 
Capitan Grande Band of Mission Indians of the Barona Reservation, 
California; Campo Band of Diegueno Mission Indians of the Campo Indian 
Reservation, California; Ewiiaapaayp Band of Kumeyaay Indians, 
California; Iipay Nation of Santa Ysabel, California (formerly the 
Santa Ysabel Band of Diegueno Mission Indians of the Santa Ysabel 
Reservation); Inaja Band of Diegueno Mission Indians of the Inaja and 
Cosmit Reservation, California; Jamul Indian Village of California; La 
Posta Band of Diegueno Mission Indians of the La Posta Indian 
Reservation, California; Manzanita Band of Diegueno Mission Indians of 
the Manzanita Reservation, California; Mesa Grande Band of Diegueno 
Mission Indians of the Mesa Grande Reservation, California; San Pasqual 
Band of Diegueno Mission

[[Page 34985]]

Indians of California; Sycuan Band of the Kumeyaay Nation; and Viejas 
(Baron Long) Group of Capitan Grande Band of Mission Indians of the 
Viejas Reservation, California (hereafter referred to as ``The 
Tribes'').

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with the unassociated funerary object should 
contact Philip Hoog, San Diego Museum of Man, 1350 El Prado, San Diego, 
CA 92101, telephone (619) 239-2001, ext. 43 before July 12, 2012. 
Repatriation of the unassociated funerary object to the Kumeyaay 
Nation, as represented by The Tribes may proceed after that date if no 
additional claimants come forward.
    The San Diego Museum of Man is responsible for notifying the 
Kumeyaay Nation, as represented by The Tribes that this notice has been 
published.

    Dated: June 7, 2012.
David Tarler,
Acting Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2012-14299 Filed 6-11-12; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-P