Notice of Inventory Completion: The Region of Three Oaks Museum, Three Oaks, MI, 23506-23507 [2012-9474]

Download as PDF 23506 Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 76 / Thursday, April 19, 2012 / Notices DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Consultation National Park Service A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Arizona State University, the Museum of New Mexico, and the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, Upper Colorado Region, professional staffs in consultation with representatives of the Navajo Nation, Arizona, New Mexico and Utah. [2253–665] Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of Interior, Bureau of Reclamation, Upper Colorado Regional Office, Salt Lake City, UT, and Arizona State University, School of Human Evolution and Social Change, Tempe, AZ National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: The U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation, Upper Colorado Region, Salt Lake City, UT, has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribe, and has determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and a present-day Indian tribe. Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains may contact the Bureau of Reclamation, Upper Colorado Region. Repatriation of the human remains to the Indian tribe stated below may occur if no additional claimants come forward. DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes it has a cultural affiliation with the human remains should contact the agency at the address below by May 21, 2012. ADDRESSES: Keith Waldron, U.S. Department of Interior, Bureau of Reclamation, Upper Colorado Region, 125 South State Street, Salt Lake City, UT 84138, telephone (801) 524–3816. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains in the possession of the Arizona State University, School of Human Evolution and Social Change, Tempe, AZ, and under the control of the U.S. Department of Interior, Bureau of Reclamation, Upper Colorado Region, Salt Lake City, UT. The human remains were removed from the pre-inundation archeological work for the Navajo Reservoir, in Archuleta and San Juan counties, NM. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES SUMMARY: VerDate Mar<15>2010 17:10 Apr 18, 2012 Jkt 226001 History and Description of the Remains In 1985, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were recovered from site LA 54175, an isolated burial in San Juan County, NM, during legally authorized excavations and collections by the Complete Archaeological Services at the Navajo Reservoir. These human remains are presently curated at the Arizona State University, School of Human Evolution and Social Change. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Based on the nature of the remains and the location, the burial has been identified as historic period Navajo, dating to A.D. 1700–1800. In 1959, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were recovered from site LA 4212 in Archuleta County, NM, during an archeological survey by the Museum of New Mexico as part of the Navajo Reservoir Project. The site is an historic structure dating to A.D. 1890–1925, and the remains were noted as ‘‘from a pothunted burial.’’ The cranium exhibits no cranial deformation, suggesting a probable Navajo affiliation; however, the cranium and mandible are not clearly identifiable as culturally affiliated with an Indian tribe. Given the totality of circumstances surrounding the acquisition of the human remains, they are most likely Navajo. These human remains are presently curated by the Arizona State University, School of Human Evolution and Social Change. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1958, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual with possible fragments of a second individual were recovered from site LA 4072 in San Juan County, NM, during legally authorized excavations and collections by the Museum of New Mexico as part of the Navajo Reservoir Project. These human remains are presently curated by the Arizona State University, School of Human Evolution and Social Change. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Based on material culture, site LA 4072 has been identified as dating to the period A.D. PO 00000 Frm 00057 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 1500–1775 which includes both the ´ Dinetah and Gobernador phases. Physical anthropological traits, burial customs, geography, and oral traditions indicate affiliation of the human remains listed above with the historic and present-day Navajo Nation, Arizona, New Mexico and Utah. Determinations Made by the U.S. Department of Interior, Bureau of Reclamation, Upper Colorado Regional Office, Salt Lake City, UT Officials of the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, Upper Colorado Region have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of a minimum of three individuals of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and the Navajo Nation, Arizona, New Mexico and Utah. Additional Requestors and Disposition Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Keith Waldron, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, 125 South State Street, Salt Lake City, UT 84138, telephone (801) 524–3816, before May 21, 2012. Repatriation of the human remains to the Navajo Nation, Arizona, New Mexico and Utah may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, Upper Colorado Region is responsible for notifying the Navajo Nation, Arizona, New Mexico and Utah that this notice has been published. Dated: April 12, 2012. David Tarler, Acting Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2012–9436 Filed 4–18–12; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [2253–665] Notice of Inventory Completion: The Region of Three Oaks Museum, Three Oaks, MI National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The Region of Three Oaks Museum has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribe, and has SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\19APN1.SGM 19APN1 Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 76 / Thursday, April 19, 2012 / Notices determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and a present-day Indian tribe. Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains may contact The Region of Three Oaks Museum. Repatriation of the human remains to the Indian tribe stated below may occur if no additional claimants come forward. DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes it has a cultural affiliation with the human remains should contact The Region of Three Oaks Museum at the address below by May 21, 2012. ADDRESSES: Judy A Jackson Vice President, The Region of Three Oaks Museum, P.O. Box 121, Three Oaks, MI 49128, telephone (269) 612–0107. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of inventory of human remains in the possession of The Region of Three Oaks Museum. The human remains were removed from an unknown location near the river between Menominee, MI, and Marinette, WI. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Consultation A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by The Region of Three Oaks Museum staff in consultation with representatives of the Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin. History and Description of the Remains Prior to 1940, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from an unknown location near the river between Menominee, MI, and Marinette, WI. The human remains were found during a fishing excursion by the uncle of Lyle Perkins, a resident of Three Oaks, MI, and remained in the possession of the Perkins family until the remains were donated to The Region of Three Oaks Museum approximately eight years ago. A handwritten note from the donor’s family states that the remains were analyzed by the Smithsonian Institute, but no other documentation supports this assertion. VerDate Mar<15>2010 17:10 Apr 18, 2012 Jkt 226001 The human remains consist of one complete human skull, possibly female. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Due to the location of the recovery of the remains, it is believed the remains are Native American and are affiliated to the Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin. Consultation with the Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin supported this affiliation. Determinations Made by The Region of Three Oaks Museum Officials of The Region of Three Oaks Museum have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of one individual of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and the Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin. Additional Requestors and Disposition Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes it to be culturally affiliated with human remains should contact Judy Jackson, Vice President, The Region of Three Oaks Museum, P.O. Box 121, Three Oaks, MI 49128, telephone (269) 612–0107 before May 21, 2012. Repatriation of the human remains to the Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The Region of Three Oaks Museum is responsible for notifying the Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin that this notice has been published. Dated: April 12, 2012. David Tarler, Acting Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2012–9474 Filed 4–18–12; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [2253–665] Notice of Inventory Completion: Museum of Anthropology at Washington State University, Pullman, WA National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The Museum of Anthropology at Washington State University has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes, and has SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00058 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 23507 determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and present-day Indian tribes. Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains may contact the Museum of Anthropology at Washington State University. Repatriation of the human remains to the Indian tribes stated below may occur if no additional claimants come forward. DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes it has a cultural affiliation with the human remains should contact the Museum of Anthropology at Washington State University at the address below by May 21, 2012. ADDRESSES: Mary Collins, WSU Museum of Anthropology, P.O. Box 644910, Pullman, WA 99164, telephone (509) 334–2812. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains in the possession and control of the Museum of Anthropology at Washington State University. The human remains were removed from Stevens County, WA. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. Consultation A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Museum of Anthropology at Washington State University professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, Washington, and the Spokane Tribe of the Spokane Reservation, Washington. History and Description of the Remains In 1979, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from an unknown location in Stevens County, WA. The remains were included in a large collection of faunal skeletons used as a comparative collection assembled by former WSU Anthropology graduate students Kent Harkins and Christopher Brown. In 2008, the comparative collection was given to the WSU Conner Museum, a unit within the School of Biological E:\FR\FM\19APN1.SGM 19APN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 77, Number 76 (Thursday, April 19, 2012)]
[Notices]
[Pages 23506-23507]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2012-9474]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[2253-665]


Notice of Inventory Completion: The Region of Three Oaks Museum, 
Three Oaks, MI

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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SUMMARY: The Region of Three Oaks Museum has completed an inventory of 
human remains, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribe, and 
has

[[Page 23507]]

determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human 
remains and a present-day Indian tribe. Representatives of any Indian 
tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human 
remains may contact The Region of Three Oaks Museum. Repatriation of 
the human remains to the Indian tribe stated below may occur if no 
additional claimants come forward.

DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes it has a 
cultural affiliation with the human remains should contact The Region 
of Three Oaks Museum at the address below by May 21, 2012.

ADDRESSES: Judy A Jackson Vice President, The Region of Three Oaks 
Museum, P.O. Box 121, Three Oaks, MI 49128, telephone (269) 612-0107.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of inventory of human remains in the 
possession of The Region of Three Oaks Museum. The human remains were 
removed from an unknown location near the river between Menominee, MI, 
and Marinette, WI.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The 
determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible 
for the determinations in this notice.

Consultation

    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by The Region 
of Three Oaks Museum staff in consultation with representatives of the 
Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin.

History and Description of the Remains

    Prior to 1940, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were removed from an unknown location near the river between 
Menominee, MI, and Marinette, WI. The human remains were found during a 
fishing excursion by the uncle of Lyle Perkins, a resident of Three 
Oaks, MI, and remained in the possession of the Perkins family until 
the remains were donated to The Region of Three Oaks Museum 
approximately eight years ago. A handwritten note from the donor's 
family states that the remains were analyzed by the Smithsonian 
Institute, but no other documentation supports this assertion. The 
human remains consist of one complete human skull, possibly female. No 
known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    Due to the location of the recovery of the remains, it is believed 
the remains are Native American and are affiliated to the Menominee 
Indian Tribe of Wisconsin. Consultation with the Menominee Indian Tribe 
of Wisconsin supported this affiliation.

Determinations Made by The Region of Three Oaks Museum

    Officials of The Region of Three Oaks Museum have determined that:
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), human remains described in 
this notice represent the physical remains of one individual of Native 
American ancestry.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of 
shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native 
American human remains and the Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin.

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes it to be 
culturally affiliated with human remains should contact Judy Jackson, 
Vice President, The Region of Three Oaks Museum, P.O. Box 121, Three 
Oaks, MI 49128, telephone (269) 612-0107 before May 21, 2012. 
Repatriation of the human remains to the Menominee Indian Tribe of 
Wisconsin may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come 
forward.
    The Region of Three Oaks Museum is responsible for notifying the 
Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin that this notice has been 
published.

    Dated: April 12, 2012.
David Tarler,
Acting Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2012-9474 Filed 4-18-12; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-P