Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of Defense, Army Corps of Engineers, Walla Walla District, Walla Walla, WA, and the Alfred W. Bowers Laboratory of Anthropology, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID, 19694-19696 [2012-7873]

Download as PDF 19694 Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 63 / Monday, April 2, 2012 / Notices Oklahoma and the Wichita and Affiliated Tribes (Wichita, Keechi, Waco & Tawakonie) may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History is responsible for notifying the Caddo Nation of Oklahoma and the Wichita and Affiliated Tribes (Wichita, Keechi, Waco & Tawakonie), Oklahoma that this notice has been published. Dated: March 28, 2012. Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2012–7864 Filed 3–30–12; 8:45 am] J. Paul Loether, Chief, National Register of Historic Places/ National Historic Landmarks Program. 1830–1960 MPS) Roughly bounded by N. Four Mile Run Dr., N. McKinley Rd., N. Larrimore, N. Madison, N. Montana Sts., & 9th St. N., Arlington, 12000239 A request for removal has been made for the following resource: COLORADO KENTUCKY Douglas County Evans Homestead Rural Historic Landscape, Address Restricted, Franktown, 12000226 Jefferson County Drumanard (Boundary Increase), 6401 Wolf Pen Branch Rd., Louisville, 88002654 cannot guarantee that we will be able to do so. [FR Doc. 2012–7749 Filed 3–30–12; 8:45 am] MAINE BILLING CODE 4312–51–P Waldo County Mill at Freedom Falls, S. side of Mill St., 125 ft. W. of Pleasant St., Freedom, 12000228 Montville Town House, 418 Center Rd., Montville, 12000227 York County Frisbee, Frank C., Elementary School, 120 Rogers Rd., Kittery, 12000229 Waterboro Grange, No. 432, 31 West Rd., Waterboro, 12000230 BILLING CODE 4320–50–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service MISSOURI Clay County Mt. Memorial Cemetery, 500 blk. E. Mississippi St., Liberty, 12000231 National Register of Historic Places; Notification of Pending Nominations and Related Actions mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES [NPS–WASO–NRNHL–0312–9815; 2200– 3200–665] Jackson County Squier Park Historic District, (Historic Residential Suburbs in the United States, 1830–1960 MPS) Roughly bounded by Armour Blvd., The Paseo, 39th St., & Troost Ave., Kansas City, 12000232 Nominations for the following properties being considered for listing or related actions in the National Register were received by the National Park Service before March 10, 2012. Pursuant to section 60.13 of 36 CFR Part 60, written comments are being accepted concerning the significance of the nominated properties under the National Register criteria for evaluation. Comments may be forwarded by United States Postal Service, to the National Register of Historic Places, National Park Service, 1849 C St. NW., MS 2280, Washington, DC 20240; by all other carriers, National Register of Historic Places, National Park Service,1201 Eye St. NW., 8th Floor, Washington DC 20005; or by fax, 202–371–6447. Written or faxed comments should be submitted by April 17, 2012. Before including your address, phone number, email address, or other personal identifying information in your comment, you should be aware that your entire comment—including your personal identifying information—may be made publicly available at any time. While you can ask us in your comment to withhold your personal identifying information from public review, we St. Louis Independent City Scudder Motor Truck Company Building, (Auto-Related Resources of St. Louis, Missouri MPS) 3942–62 Laclede Ave., St. Louis (Independent City), 12000233 NORTH CAROLINA Catawba County George, Lee & Helen, House, 16 9th Ave., NE., Hickory, 12000234 Davidson County Chapel Hill Church Tabernacle, 1457 Chapel Hill Church Rd., Denton, 12000235 Gaston County Downtown Mount Holly Historic District, 100 blks., N. & S. Main Sts. & W. Central Ave., Mount Holly, 12000236 Hertford County Ahoskie Historic District, Roughly bounded by Pembroke Ave., Catherine Creek Rd., Colony, Alton, Maple, & South Sts., Ahoskie, 12000237 Iredell County Mooresville Mill Village Historic District, Bounded by Wilson, Cauldwell, Kennette, Lutz, Messeck, & Catawba Aves., Smith & Bruce, Sts., & Shearers Rd., Mooresville, 12000238 VIRGINIA Arlington County Dominion Hills Historic District, (Historic Residential Suburbs in the United States, VerDate Mar<15>2010 17:42 Mar 30, 2012 Jkt 226001 PO 00000 Frm 00085 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [2253–665] Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of Defense, Army Corps of Engineers, Walla Walla District, Walla Walla, WA, and the Alfred W. Bowers Laboratory of Anthropology, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The United States Department of Defense, Army Corps of Engineers, Walla Walla District, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribe, has determined that the cultural items meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects and repatriation to the Indian tribe stated below may occur if no additional claimants come forward. Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the cultural items may contact the U.S. Department of Defense, Army Corps of Engineers, Walla Walla District. DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes it has a cultural affiliation with the cultural items should contact the U.S. Department of Defense, Army Corps of Engineers, Walla Walla District at the address below by May 2, 2012. ADDRESSES: LTC David Caldwell, U.S. Department of Defense, Army Corps of Engineers, Walla Walla District, 201 North Third Ave., Walla Walla, WA 99362, telephone (509) 527–7700. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate cultural items under the control of the U.S. Department of Defense, Army Corps of Engineers, Walla Walla District (Corps), Walla Walla, WA, and in the physical custody of the Alfred W. Bowers Laboratory of Anthropology, University SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\02APN1.SGM 02APN1 Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 63 / Monday, April 2, 2012 / Notices mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES of Idaho (UI), Moscow, ID, that meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution or Federal agency that has control of the cultural items. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. History and Description of the Cultural Items In 1964, a Washington State University (WSU) team excavated sites 10NP1 (near Captain John Creek) and 10NP27 (near Buffalo Draw) on the east side of the Snake River, in Nez Perce County, ID. Sites 10NP1 and 10NP27 are located on lands that were to be inundated for the Asotin Dam Reservoir, which was never constructed. While the sites are not on Corps property, the Corps has taken responsibility for the objects collected at the sites. Unassociated funerary objects from the sites were removed and transported to WSU, and were transferred to UI in 2000. Human remains with associated funerary objects from these two sites are included in a corresponding Notice of Inventory Completion. From site 10NP1, the 11 unassociated funerary objects include 1 lot of fragmented mammal bones; 1 charcoal sample; 1 piece of mussel shell; 1 piece of debitage; 5 snail shells; 1 soil sample; and 1 lot of rocks. From site 10NP27, the 44 unassociated funerary objects include 2 pieces of burned mammal bone; 1 burned rodent jaw; 28 pieces of debitage; 8 pipe bowl fragments; 1 projectile point; 1 projectile point base; 2 modified flakes; and 1 charcoal sample. According to the 1969 survey report, the burials at site 10NP1 were typical of the late prehistoric period. The burials contained the partial skeletal remains of an adult male and an adult female, both arranged in flexed positions. Each individual was wrapped in tule matting, lay on an east-west axis and faced west toward the Snake River. According to the report, a subsurface cairn containing a hopper mortar had been constructed directly above the burial. The site is in the zone of exploitation of the Nez Perce ´ village of ?ilaqatpa?tpo. In 1973, a UI team led by Roderick Sprague excavated sites 10NP109 (Upper Tammany), 10NP110 (Lower Tammany), and 10NP131 (Tammany Talus) near the confluence of Tammany Creek with the Snake River in Nez Perce County, ID. Sites 10NP109, 10NP110 and 10NP131 are located within the VerDate Mar<15>2010 17:42 Mar 30, 2012 Jkt 226001 Lower Granite Lock and Dam Project on the Snake River. The Lower Granite Lock and Dam Project is managed by the Corps, who initiated a land acquisition processes for the Project in 1965. Human remains from these sites were reburied in 1978 at the Hill Top Cemetery in Spalding, ID, as part of the Nez Perce Grave Removal Project (NPGRP). The objects from these burials meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects. Site 10NP109 contained 17 heavily potted burials. Unassociated funerary objects were recovered from Burials 4, 5, 7, 8, 10, 12, 14 and 16. The 61 unassociated funerary objects include 2 charcoal samples, 18 charcoal/organic samples, 1 chert projectile point, 6 copper fragments, 1 piece of chert debitage, 3 dentalium shell beads, 4 dentalium bead fragments, 18 dentalium shell fragments, 1 mussel shell pendant, 1 mussel shell, 5 mussel shell fragments and 1 water-snail shell. Objects from site10NP109 may date to the late prehistoric or protohistoric period due to the abundance of dentalia shells and the presence of iron and copper objects combined with a lack of glass trade beads. Human remains recovered from this site were examined by a physical anthropologist and one individual exhibited signs of fronto-occipital deformation, a common trait found in Native American remains. Site 10NP110 contained 45 badly disturbed burials. Unassociated funerary objects were recovered from Burials 2– 4, 11, 14, 16–19, 21–23, 25–45, and other unknown burial numbers. The 658 unassociated funerary artifacts include 1 hollowed bone fragment; 7 mammal bones (size not specified); 11 small mammal bones; 9 medium mammal bones; 20 large mammal bones; 1 elk antler; 11 charcoal samples; 1 copper pendant; 6 pieces of debitage; 535 dentalium shell; 4 dentalium shell fragments; 17 mussel shells; 1 lot of mussel shell; 1 piece of melted glass; 1 piece of granite; 11 ochre samples; 5 pestles; 2 pipe stem/bowls; 2 projectile points; 1 seed pod; 8 shell pendants; 1 piece of unidentified metal; 1 wood sample; and 1 lot of wood. Objects from site 10NP110 may date to the late prehistoric or protohistoric age due to the position of the burials, the abundance of dentalia shells and the characteristic application of red ochre to the human remains prior to burial. Human remains recovered from this site were examined by a physical anthropologist. Ten individuals exhibited signs of fronto-occipital deformation and two individuals exhibited signs of fronto-lambdoidal PO 00000 Frm 00086 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 19695 deformation, a common trait found in Native American remains. Site 10NP131 contained 10 disturbed burials. Unassociated funerary objects were recovered from Burials 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 9, and other unidentified burials. The 52 unassociated funerary objects include 1 biface; 1 hollowed out bone artifact; 1 bone fragment; 1 piece of mammal bone; 1 triangular brass plate; 1 charcoal sample; 1 piece of charcoal; 3 pieces of debitage; 8 pieces of modified debitage; 2 dentalium beads; 2 mussel shells; 1 shell bead; 1 drill; 1 piece of matting; 15 metal fragments; 1 piece of red ochre; 1 stone pendant; 3 pieces of saw-cut lumber; 1 wood sample; 2 miscellaneous lithics; 2 charcoal pieces with 1 dentalium fragment; and 2 pestle fragments. Objects from site 10NP131 may date to the late prehistoric or protohistoric period, most likely prior to A.D. 1750, based on the position of the remains and the presence of dentalia shells, iron and copper objects, and a lack of glass trade beads. Westerly-orientated cairn burials are typical of the Lower Snake River region in the late prehistoric period. Sites 10NP109, 10NP110 and 10NP131 are located near the historically important Nez Perce site Hasotino, meaning ‘‘the great eel fishery,’’ which was reported by H.J. Spinden in 1908. This site is located within the judicially established land area of the Nez Perce Tribe, Idaho. Five lines of evidence—geographical, biological, archeological, anthropological and historical—support a cultural affiliation between the Nez Perce Tribe, Idaho, and the unassociated funerary objects identified in all of the sites above. Determinations Made by the U.S. Department of Defense, Army Corps of Engineers, Walla Walla District Officials of the U.S. Department of Defense, Army Corps of Engineers, Walla Walla District, have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(B), the 826 cultural items described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony and are believed, by a preponderance of the evidence, to have been removed from specific burial sites of Native American individuals. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship or shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the unassociated funerary objects and the Nez Perce Tribe, Idaho. E:\FR\FM\02APN1.SGM 02APN1 19696 Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 63 / Monday, April 2, 2012 / Notices Additional Requestors and Disposition Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the unassociated funerary objects should contact LTC David Caldwell, U.S. Department of Defense, Army Corps of Engineers, Walla Walla District, 201 North Third Ave., Walla Walla, WA 99362, telephone (509) 527– 7700, before May 2, 2012. Repatriation of the unassociated funerary objects to the Nez Perce Tribe, Idaho, may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The U.S. Department of Defense, Army Corps of Engineers, Walla Walla District, is responsible for notifying the Nez Perce Tribe, Idaho, that this notice has been published. Dated: March 28, 2012. Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2012–7873 Filed 3–30–12; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [2253–665] Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: California Department of Parks and Recreation, Sacramento, CA National Park Service, Interior. Notice AGENCY: ACTION: The California Department of Parks and Recreation, in consultation with the appropriate tribes, has determined that the cultural items meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects and repatriation to the Indian tribes stated below may occur if no additional claimants come forward. Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the cultural item may contact the California Department of Parks and Recreation. SUMMARY: Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes it has a cultural affiliation with the cultural item should contact the California Department of Parks and Recreation at the address below by May 2, 2012. ADDRESSES: Rebecca Carruthers, NAGPRA Coordinator, California Department of Parks and Recreation, 1416 9th Street, Room 902, Sacramento, CA 95814, telephone (916) 653–8893. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate cultural mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES DATES: VerDate Mar<15>2010 17:42 Mar 30, 2012 Jkt 226001 items under the control of the California Department of Parks and Recreation that meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects under 25 U.S.C. 3001. The unassociated funerary objects were removed from ten sites located in northeastern San Diego County, CA. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution or Federal agency that has control of the Native American cultural item. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. History and Description of the Cultural Item The unassociated funerary objects were removed from ten sites located in northeastern San Diego County, CA. The geographical location of the ten sites indicates the unassociated funerary objects were recovered within the historically documented territory of the Cahuilla. The traditional aboriginal territory of the Cahuilla, as defined by anthropologist Lowell John Bean, encompasses a geographically diverse area of mountains, valleys and low desert zones. The southernmost boundary approximately followed a line from just below Borrego Springs to the north end of the Salton Basin and the Chocolate Mountains. The eastern boundary ran along the summit of the San Bernardino Mountains. The northern boundary stood within the San Jacinto Plain near Riverside, while the base of Palomar Mountain formed the western boundary. According to Bean and archeologist William D. Strong, the northern end of Anza-Borrego Desert State Park lies within the traditional territory of the Cahuilla and includes Borrego Palm Canyon, Coyote Canyon, Clark Valley, the Santa Rosa Mountains, Jackass Flat, Rockhouse Canyon, and Horse Canyon. In 1955, Ben McCown collected a ceramic pipe bowl fragment from site CA–SDI–1465 (Hidden Springs) in the Borrego Palm Canyon and Jackass Flat areas of Anza Borrego Desert State Park, a large village site that had been occupied for a considerable period of time prior to and during the historic period and known to contain cremated human remains. The pipe bowl fragment is an unassociated funerary object based on the proximity of human cremation burials in the area, the ceremonial/personal nature of the object, and the burned exterior which is consistent with exposure to heat during cremation. PO 00000 Frm 00087 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 In 1955, park visitor Gary Masters collected a ceramic pipe from site VC– 1 in the Borrego Palm Canyon area of Anza Borrego Desert State Park, an area known to contain large village sites with cremation burials. The pipe is an unassociated funerary object based on the proximity of human cremation burials in the area and the ceremonial/ personal nature of the object. Although the object does not appear to be heavily burned, it is more likely than not to have come from a funerary context. At an unknown date, Paul Jorgenson collected a small pinch bowl from site CA–SDI–224 (Middle Willows) in the Borrego Palm Canyon area of Anza Borrego Desert State Park, an area known to contain large village sites with cremation burials. The bowl is an unassociated funerary object based on the proximity of human cremation burials in the area and the ceremonial/ personal nature of the object. Although the object does not appear to be heavily burned, it is more likely than not to have come from a funerary context. Sometime in the 1970s, San Diego State University students and Professor Paul Ezell collected three pipe fragments, 75 burnt Olivella shell beads and a burnt glass bead from site CA– SDI–343 (Lower Willows) in the Borrego Palm Canyon area of Anza Borrego Desert State Park, a large village complex at Santa Caterina Spring known to contain cremation burials. The objects are unassociated funerary objects based on the proximity of human cremation burials in the area, the ceremonial/personal nature of the objects, and the burned exterior which is consistent with exposure to heat during cremation. Sometime in the 1970s, archeologist William Seidel collected one small burnt clay ball from site CA–SDI–2328 (Lower Willows) in the Borrego Palm Canyon area of Anza Borrego Desert State Park, a large village complex at Santa Caterina Spring known to contain cremation burials. The object is an unassociated funerary based on the proximity of human cremation burials in the area, ceremonial/personal nature of the object, and the burned exterior which is consistent with exposure to heat during cremation. Sometime in the 1970s, archeologist William Seidel collected one pipe bowl fragment from site CA–SDI–2336 in the Collins Valley area of Anza Borrego Desert State Park, a site known to have cremations and burials. The object is an unassociated funerary object based on the proximity of human cremation burials in the area, ceremonial/personal nature of the object, and the burned E:\FR\FM\02APN1.SGM 02APN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 77, Number 63 (Monday, April 2, 2012)]
[Notices]
[Pages 19694-19696]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2012-7873]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[2253-665]


Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of 
Defense, Army Corps of Engineers, Walla Walla District, Walla Walla, 
WA, and the Alfred W. Bowers Laboratory of Anthropology, University of 
Idaho, Moscow, ID

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The United States Department of Defense, Army Corps of 
Engineers, Walla Walla District, in consultation with the appropriate 
Indian tribe, has determined that the cultural items meet the 
definition of unassociated funerary objects and repatriation to the 
Indian tribe stated below may occur if no additional claimants come 
forward. Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes itself to be 
culturally affiliated with the cultural items may contact the U.S. 
Department of Defense, Army Corps of Engineers, Walla Walla District.

DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes it has a 
cultural affiliation with the cultural items should contact the U.S. 
Department of Defense, Army Corps of Engineers, Walla Walla District at 
the address below by May 2, 2012.

ADDRESSES: LTC David Caldwell, U.S. Department of Defense, Army Corps 
of Engineers, Walla Walla District, 201 North Third Ave., Walla Walla, 
WA 99362, telephone (509) 527-7700.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate cultural items under the 
control of the U.S. Department of Defense, Army Corps of Engineers, 
Walla Walla District (Corps), Walla Walla, WA, and in the physical 
custody of the Alfred W. Bowers Laboratory of Anthropology, University

[[Page 19695]]

of Idaho (UI), Moscow, ID, that meet the definition of unassociated 
funerary objects under 25 U.S.C. 3001.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The 
determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution or Federal agency that has control of the cultural 
items. The National Park Service is not responsible for the 
determinations in this notice.

History and Description of the Cultural Items

    In 1964, a Washington State University (WSU) team excavated sites 
10NP1 (near Captain John Creek) and 10NP27 (near Buffalo Draw) on the 
east side of the Snake River, in Nez Perce County, ID. Sites 10NP1 and 
10NP27 are located on lands that were to be inundated for the Asotin 
Dam Reservoir, which was never constructed. While the sites are not on 
Corps property, the Corps has taken responsibility for the objects 
collected at the sites. Unassociated funerary objects from the sites 
were removed and transported to WSU, and were transferred to UI in 
2000. Human remains with associated funerary objects from these two 
sites are included in a corresponding Notice of Inventory Completion. 
From site 10NP1, the 11 unassociated funerary objects include 1 lot of 
fragmented mammal bones; 1 charcoal sample; 1 piece of mussel shell; 1 
piece of debitage; 5 snail shells; 1 soil sample; and 1 lot of rocks. 
From site 10NP27, the 44 unassociated funerary objects include 2 pieces 
of burned mammal bone; 1 burned rodent jaw; 28 pieces of debitage; 8 
pipe bowl fragments; 1 projectile point; 1 projectile point base; 2 
modified flakes; and 1 charcoal sample.
    According to the 1969 survey report, the burials at site 10NP1 were 
typical of the late prehistoric period. The burials contained the 
partial skeletal remains of an adult male and an adult female, both 
arranged in flexed positions. Each individual was wrapped in tule 
matting, lay on an east-west axis and faced west toward the Snake 
River. According to the report, a subsurface cairn containing a hopper 
mortar had been constructed directly above the burial. The site is in 
the zone of exploitation of the Nez Perce village of 
?ilaqatp[aacute]?tpo.
    In 1973, a UI team led by Roderick Sprague excavated sites 10NP109 
(Upper Tammany), 10NP110 (Lower Tammany), and 10NP131 (Tammany Talus) 
near the confluence of Tammany Creek with the Snake River in Nez Perce 
County, ID. Sites 10NP109, 10NP110 and 10NP131 are located within the 
Lower Granite Lock and Dam Project on the Snake River. The Lower 
Granite Lock and Dam Project is managed by the Corps, who initiated a 
land acquisition processes for the Project in 1965. Human remains from 
these sites were reburied in 1978 at the Hill Top Cemetery in Spalding, 
ID, as part of the Nez Perce Grave Removal Project (NPGRP). The objects 
from these burials meet the definition of unassociated funerary 
objects.
    Site 10NP109 contained 17 heavily potted burials. Unassociated 
funerary objects were recovered from Burials 4, 5, 7, 8, 10, 12, 14 and 
16. The 61 unassociated funerary objects include 2 charcoal samples, 18 
charcoal/organic samples, 1 chert projectile point, 6 copper fragments, 
1 piece of chert debitage, 3 dentalium shell beads, 4 dentalium bead 
fragments, 18 dentalium shell fragments, 1 mussel shell pendant, 1 
mussel shell, 5 mussel shell fragments and 1 water-snail shell. Objects 
from site10NP109 may date to the late prehistoric or protohistoric 
period due to the abundance of dentalia shells and the presence of iron 
and copper objects combined with a lack of glass trade beads. Human 
remains recovered from this site were examined by a physical 
anthropologist and one individual exhibited signs of fronto-occipital 
deformation, a common trait found in Native American remains.
    Site 10NP110 contained 45 badly disturbed burials. Unassociated 
funerary objects were recovered from Burials 2-4, 11, 14, 16-19, 21-23, 
25-45, and other unknown burial numbers. The 658 unassociated funerary 
artifacts include 1 hollowed bone fragment; 7 mammal bones (size not 
specified); 11 small mammal bones; 9 medium mammal bones; 20 large 
mammal bones; 1 elk antler; 11 charcoal samples; 1 copper pendant; 6 
pieces of debitage; 535 dentalium shell; 4 dentalium shell fragments; 
17 mussel shells; 1 lot of mussel shell; 1 piece of melted glass; 1 
piece of granite; 11 ochre samples; 5 pestles; 2 pipe stem/bowls; 2 
projectile points; 1 seed pod; 8 shell pendants; 1 piece of 
unidentified metal; 1 wood sample; and 1 lot of wood. Objects from site 
10NP110 may date to the late prehistoric or protohistoric age due to 
the position of the burials, the abundance of dentalia shells and the 
characteristic application of red ochre to the human remains prior to 
burial. Human remains recovered from this site were examined by a 
physical anthropologist. Ten individuals exhibited signs of fronto-
occipital deformation and two individuals exhibited signs of fronto-
lambdoidal deformation, a common trait found in Native American 
remains.
    Site 10NP131 contained 10 disturbed burials. Unassociated funerary 
objects were recovered from Burials 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 9, and other 
unidentified burials. The 52 unassociated funerary objects include 1 
biface; 1 hollowed out bone artifact; 1 bone fragment; 1 piece of 
mammal bone; 1 triangular brass plate; 1 charcoal sample; 1 piece of 
charcoal; 3 pieces of debitage; 8 pieces of modified debitage; 2 
dentalium beads; 2 mussel shells; 1 shell bead; 1 drill; 1 piece of 
matting; 15 metal fragments; 1 piece of red ochre; 1 stone pendant; 3 
pieces of saw-cut lumber; 1 wood sample; 2 miscellaneous lithics; 2 
charcoal pieces with 1 dentalium fragment; and 2 pestle fragments. 
Objects from site 10NP131 may date to the late prehistoric or 
protohistoric period, most likely prior to A.D. 1750, based on the 
position of the remains and the presence of dentalia shells, iron and 
copper objects, and a lack of glass trade beads. Westerly-orientated 
cairn burials are typical of the Lower Snake River region in the late 
prehistoric period.
    Sites 10NP109, 10NP110 and 10NP131 are located near the 
historically important Nez Perce site Hasotino, meaning ``the great eel 
fishery,'' which was reported by H.J. Spinden in 1908. This site is 
located within the judicially established land area of the Nez Perce 
Tribe, Idaho.
    Five lines of evidence--geographical, biological, archeological, 
anthropological and historical--support a cultural affiliation between 
the Nez Perce Tribe, Idaho, and the unassociated funerary objects 
identified in all of the sites above.

Determinations Made by the U.S. Department of Defense, Army Corps of 
Engineers, Walla Walla District

    Officials of the U.S. Department of Defense, Army Corps of 
Engineers, Walla Walla District, have determined that:
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(B), the 826 cultural items 
described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or 
near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of 
the death rite or ceremony and are believed, by a preponderance of the 
evidence, to have been removed from specific burial sites of Native 
American individuals.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship or 
shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the 
unassociated funerary objects and the Nez Perce Tribe, Idaho.

[[Page 19696]]

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with the unassociated funerary objects should 
contact LTC David Caldwell, U.S. Department of Defense, Army Corps of 
Engineers, Walla Walla District, 201 North Third Ave., Walla Walla, WA 
99362, telephone (509) 527-7700, before May 2, 2012. Repatriation of 
the unassociated funerary objects to the Nez Perce Tribe, Idaho, may 
proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward.
    The U.S. Department of Defense, Army Corps of Engineers, Walla 
Walla District, is responsible for notifying the Nez Perce Tribe, 
Idaho, that this notice has been published.

    Dated: March 28, 2012.
Sherry Hutt,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2012-7873 Filed 3-30-12; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-P