Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO, 5837-5838 [2012-2526]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 24 / Monday, February 6, 2012 / Notices DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [2253–665] Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, Denver, CO National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: The University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes, has determined that the cultural items meet the definition of sacred objects and repatriation to the Indian tribe stated below may occur if no additional claimants come forward. Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the cultural items may contact the University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology. SUMMARY: Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes it has a cultural affiliation with the cultural items should contact the University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology at the address below by March 7, 2012. ADDRESSES: Anne Coats Amati, NAGPRA Coordinator/Registrar, University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, 2000 E Asbury, Sturm 146, Denver, CO 80208, telephone (303) 871–2687. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate cultural items in the possession of the University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology (DUMA), that meet the definition of sacred objects under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American cultural items. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES DATES: History and Description of the Cultural Items In consultation with representatives of the Santa Rosa Indian Community of the Santa Rosa Rancheria, California VerDate Mar<15>2010 17:27 Feb 03, 2012 Jkt 226001 (Tachi Yokut Tribe), the four baskets in this notice (1638 A–B, 1640, 1655, 3789) are determined to be sacred objects. Between 1951 and 1952, a lidded basket in the collection of Mrs. Charles S. Sprague, was accessioned into DUMA. The treasure basket (1638 A–B) is a finely woven, small, lidded basket that features a diamond design in a brown-red color. Remnants of a leather loop are present on the lid. The diamond design on the treasure basket has been identified as a snake design that represents the gopher or king snake. Between 1951 and 1952, a basket in the collection of Mrs. Charles S. Sprague, was accessioned into DUMA. The hat basket or small offering basket (1640) is a small, finely woven, coiled basket with steeply slanted sides and a stepped red-brown design that symbolizes the four stages of life. Between 1951 and 1952, a basket in the collection of Mrs. Charles S. Sprague, was accessioned into DUMA. The hat basket (1655) has steeply slanted sides and is constructed from single-rod coils. It is colored dark brown, red-brown and a natural fiber color. The basket has a band one coil wide in red-brown near the rim and a similar band at the edge of the base. The lightning design, five radiating lines that form stepped parallelograms in dark brown, associate the basket with the ‘‘Rain Ceremony’’ worn by female ‘‘Rain Doctors.’’ The basket was also worn as ceremonial regalia by young girls in the ‘‘Coming of Age Ceremony.’’ In 1969, Kate Peck Kent donated a bowl-shaped, single-rod, coiled basket (3789) to DUMA. The decoration features two bands of three coils each in dark brown around the shoulder. The rest of the basket is a variegated natural fiber color. Parts of three coils approximately 3.0 cm from the base are broken but have been stabilized. The basket was identified as a Ceremonial Cooking basket used on such occasions as the ‘‘Spring Ceremony’’ for the preparation of acorn. It was identified as being made by two different weavers, from the Tubatalatal and Lake Isabella areas. Determinations Made by the University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology Officials of DUMA have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(C), the four cultural items described above are specific ceremonial objects needed by traditional Native American religious leaders for the practice of traditional Native American religions by their present-day adherents. PO 00000 Frm 00083 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 5837 • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the sacred objects and the Santa Rosa Indian Community of the Santa Rosa Rancheria, California (Tachi Yokut Tribe). Additional Requestors and Disposition Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the sacred objects should contact Anne Coats Amati, University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, 2000 E Asbury Ave, Sturm 146, Denver, CO 80208, telephone (303) 871–2687, before March 7, 2012. Repatriation of the sacred objects to the Santa Rosa Indian Community of the Santa Rosa Rancheria, California (Tachi Yokut Tribe) may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. DUMA is responsible for notifying the Berry Creek Rancheria of Maidu Indians of California; Buena Vista Rancheria of Me-Wuk Indians of California; California Valley Miwok Tribe, California; Cedarville Rancheria, California; Cher-Ae Heights Indian Community of the Trinidad Rancheria, California; Chicken Ranch Rancheria of Me-Wuk Indians of California; Enterprise Rancheria of Maidu Indians of California; Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria, California; Fort McDermitt Paiute and Shoshone Tribes of the Fort McDermitt Indian Reservation, Nevada and Oregon; Greenville Rancheria of Maidu Indians of California; Ione Band of Miwok Indians of California; Jackson Rancheria of Me-Wuk Indians of California; Mechoopda Indian Tribe of Chico Rancheria, California; Mooretown Rancheria of Maidu Indians of California; Paiute-Shoshone Tribe of the Fallon Reservation and Colony, Nevada; Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe of the Pyramid Lake Reservation, Nevada; Reno-Sparks Indian Colony, Nevada; Santa Rosa Indian Community of the Santa Rosa Rancheria, California (Tachi Yokut Tribe); Shingle Springs Band of Miwok Indians, Shingle Springs Rancheria (Verona Tract), California; Shoshone-Paiute Tribes of the Duck Valley Reservation, Nevada; Susanville Indian Rancheria, California; Tuolumne Band of Me-Wuk Indians of the Tuolumne Rancheria of California; United Auburn Indian Community of the Auburn Rancheria of California; Walker River Paiute Tribe of the Walker River Reservation, Nevada; Winnemucca Indian Colony of Nevada; and Yerington Paiute Tribe of the Yerington Colony & Campbell Ranch, E:\FR\FM\06FEN1.SGM 06FEN1 5838 Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 24 / Monday, February 6, 2012 / Notices Nevada that this notice has been published. History and Description of the Cultural Items Dated: January 31, 2012. Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. In the early 1930s, 12 unassociated funerary objects were removed from San Francisco Mt:11:2(GP) in the Coconino National Forest, Coconino County, AZ, during archeological excavations conducted by the Gila Pueblo Foundation (a private archeological research facility formerly located in Globe, AZ). In the early 1950s, the Gila Pueblo Foundation closed and the collection became in the physical custody of the Arizona State Museum (ASM), Tucson, AZ. The 12 unassociated funerary objects are: 7 projectile points, 4 bone whistles and 1 spindle whorl. Based on the ceramic collection, San Francisco Mt:11:2(GP) has been identified as a small Northern Sinagua residential site. The ceramic seriation suggests the site was occupied in the 11th and/or 12th centuries. Records at ASM indicate that these 12 cultural items were removed from a burial context and that the human remains were either left in the ground or are not locatable at the present time. In the early 1930s, one unassociated funerary object, a miniature bowl, was removed from the Coconino National Forest at the Picture Canyon Site [San Francisco Mt:14:1(GP)] in Coconino County, AZ, during archeological excavations conducted by the Gila Pueblo Foundation. Since the early 1950s, the object has been in the physical custody of ASM. Based on the ceramic collection, Picture Canyon Site has been identified as a small Northern Sinagua residential site. The ceramic seriation suggests the site was occupied in the 11th and/or 12th centuries. Records at ASM indicate that the single cultural item was removed from a burial context and that the human remains were either left in the ground or are not locatable at the present time. In the early 1930s, 909 unassociated funerary objects were removed from the Coconino National Forest at the New Caves Site [San Francisco Mt:14:5(GP)] in Coconino County, AZ, during archeological excavations conducted by the Gila Pueblo Foundation. Since the early 1950s, the objects have been in the physical custody of ASM. The 909 unassociated funerary objects are: 1 shell bracelet; 1 shell necklace; 1 shell trumpet; 862 shell beads; 2 ceramic pitchers; 2 ceramic ladles; 1 ceramic canteen; 21 ceramic bowls; 7 ceramic jars; 1 sherd disc; 1 stone disc; 5 projectile points; 3 stone artifacts and 1 bone awl. [FR Doc. 2012–2526 Filed 2–3–12; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [2253–665] Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: USDA Forest Service, Coconino National Forest, Flagstaff, AZ AGENCY: ACTION: National Park Service, Interior. Notice. The USDA Forest Service, Coconino NF, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribe, has determined that the cultural items meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects and repatriation to the Indian tribe stated below may occur if no additional claimants come forward. Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the cultural items may contact the USDA Forest Service, Southwestern Region. SUMMARY: Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes it has a cultural affiliation with the cultural items should contact the USDA Forest Service, Southwestern Region at the address below by March 7, 2012. DATES: Dr. Frank E. Wozniak, NAGPRA Coordinator, Southwestern Region, USDA Forest Service, 333 Broadway Blvd. SE., Albuquerque, NM 87102, telephone (505) 842–3238. ADDRESSES: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate cultural items under the control of the Coconino National Forest that meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American cultural items. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: VerDate Mar<15>2010 17:27 Feb 03, 2012 Jkt 226001 PO 00000 Frm 00084 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Based on the ceramic collection, material culture and architecture, the New Caves Site has been identified as a large Northern Sinagua residential site. The ceramic seriation suggests the site was occupied between the 13th and 14th centuries A.D. Records at ASM indicate that the 909 cultural items were removed from a burial context and that the human remains were either left in the ground or are not locatable at the present time. In 1928 and 1929, 812 unassociated funerary objects were removed from the Coconino National Forest at the Turkey Hill Pueblo Site [AZ I:14:1 (ASM)] during archeological excavations conducted by Dr. Byron Cummings of the University of Arizona. Since removal, this collection has been stored at ASM. The 812 unassociated funerary objects are: 24 ceramic jars; 91 ceramic bowls; 8 ceramic pitchers; 9 ceramic ladles; 1 ceramic mug; 1 ceramic rattle; 1 ceramic scoop; 1 ceramic dipper; 1 ceramic boot pot; 1 ceramic sherd; 11 pendants; 639 beads; 1 button; 4 awls; 1 piece of petrified wood; 1 piece of pigment; 1 turquoise necklace; 2 shell necklaces; 1 shell bracelet; 1 shell trumpet; 1 shell artifact; 1 bone needle; 1 bone hairpin; 1 bone knife; 5 stone knives; 1 stone hammer; and 2 macaw bones. Based on the ceramic collections, material culture and architecture, the Turkey Hill Site has been identified as a large Northern Sinagua Pueblo Site. Ceramic seriation suggests the Site was occupied between the 13th and 14th centuries A.D. The records at ASM indicate that the 812 cultural items were removed from a burial context and that the human remains were either left in the ground or are not locatable at the present time. In 1928 or 1929, one unassociated funerary object, a piece of azurite, was removed from an unidentified archeological site in the Coconino National Forest near the Turkey Hill Pueblo in Coconino County, AZ. The azurite was removed during archeological excavations conducted by Dr. Byron Cummings of the University of Arizona and was curated at ASM. Based on the ceramic items from the site (none of which are funerary objects), the site has been identified as Northern Sinagua. Ceramic seriation suggests the site was occupied in the 13th and/or 14th centuries. The records at ASM indicate that the single cultural item was removed from a burial context and that the human remains were either left in the ground or are not locatable at the present time. In 1928 or 1929, three unassociated funerary objects were removed from an E:\FR\FM\06FEN1.SGM 06FEN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 77, Number 24 (Monday, February 6, 2012)]
[Notices]
[Pages 5837-5838]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2012-2526]



[[Page 5837]]

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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[2253-665]


Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: University of 
Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, Denver, 
CO

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum 
of Anthropology, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes, 
has determined that the cultural items meet the definition of sacred 
objects and repatriation to the Indian tribe stated below may occur if 
no additional claimants come forward. Representatives of any Indian 
tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the 
cultural items may contact the University of Denver Department of 
Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology.

DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes it has a 
cultural affiliation with the cultural items should contact the 
University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of 
Anthropology at the address below by March 7, 2012.

ADDRESSES: Anne Coats Amati, NAGPRA Coordinator/Registrar, University 
of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology, 2000 E 
Asbury, Sturm 146, Denver, CO 80208, telephone (303) 871-2687.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate cultural items in the 
possession of the University of Denver Department of Anthropology and 
Museum of Anthropology (DUMA), that meet the definition of sacred 
objects under 25 U.S.C. 3001.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The 
determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American cultural items. The National Park Service is not responsible 
for the determinations in this notice.

History and Description of the Cultural Items

    In consultation with representatives of the Santa Rosa Indian 
Community of the Santa Rosa Rancheria, California (Tachi Yokut Tribe), 
the four baskets in this notice (1638 A-B, 1640, 1655, 3789) are 
determined to be sacred objects.
    Between 1951 and 1952, a lidded basket in the collection of Mrs. 
Charles S. Sprague, was accessioned into DUMA. The treasure basket 
(1638 A-B) is a finely woven, small, lidded basket that features a 
diamond design in a brown-red color. Remnants of a leather loop are 
present on the lid. The diamond design on the treasure basket has been 
identified as a snake design that represents the gopher or king snake.
    Between 1951 and 1952, a basket in the collection of Mrs. Charles 
S. Sprague, was accessioned into DUMA. The hat basket or small offering 
basket (1640) is a small, finely woven, coiled basket with steeply 
slanted sides and a stepped red-brown design that symbolizes the four 
stages of life.
    Between 1951 and 1952, a basket in the collection of Mrs. Charles 
S. Sprague, was accessioned into DUMA. The hat basket (1655) has 
steeply slanted sides and is constructed from single-rod coils. It is 
colored dark brown, red-brown and a natural fiber color. The basket has 
a band one coil wide in red-brown near the rim and a similar band at 
the edge of the base. The lightning design, five radiating lines that 
form stepped parallelograms in dark brown, associate the basket with 
the ``Rain Ceremony'' worn by female ``Rain Doctors.'' The basket was 
also worn as ceremonial regalia by young girls in the ``Coming of Age 
Ceremony.''
    In 1969, Kate Peck Kent donated a bowl-shaped, single-rod, coiled 
basket (3789) to DUMA. The decoration features two bands of three coils 
each in dark brown around the shoulder. The rest of the basket is a 
variegated natural fiber color. Parts of three coils approximately 3.0 
cm from the base are broken but have been stabilized. The basket was 
identified as a Ceremonial Cooking basket used on such occasions as the 
``Spring Ceremony'' for the preparation of acorn. It was identified as 
being made by two different weavers, from the Tubatalatal and Lake 
Isabella areas.

Determinations Made by the University of Denver Department of 
Anthropology and Museum of Anthropology

    Officials of DUMA have determined that:
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(C), the four cultural items 
described above are specific ceremonial objects needed by traditional 
Native American religious leaders for the practice of traditional 
Native American religions by their present-day adherents.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of 
shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the sacred 
objects and the Santa Rosa Indian Community of the Santa Rosa 
Rancheria, California (Tachi Yokut Tribe).

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with the sacred objects should contact Anne 
Coats Amati, University of Denver Department of Anthropology and Museum 
of Anthropology, 2000 E Asbury Ave, Sturm 146, Denver, CO 80208, 
telephone (303) 871-2687, before March 7, 2012. Repatriation of the 
sacred objects to the Santa Rosa Indian Community of the Santa Rosa 
Rancheria, California (Tachi Yokut Tribe) may proceed after that date 
if no additional claimants come forward.
    DUMA is responsible for notifying the Berry Creek Rancheria of 
Maidu Indians of California; Buena Vista Rancheria of Me-Wuk Indians of 
California; California Valley Miwok Tribe, California; Cedarville 
Rancheria, California; Cher-Ae Heights Indian Community of the Trinidad 
Rancheria, California; Chicken Ranch Rancheria of Me-Wuk Indians of 
California; Enterprise Rancheria of Maidu Indians of California; 
Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria, California; Fort McDermitt 
Paiute and Shoshone Tribes of the Fort McDermitt Indian Reservation, 
Nevada and Oregon; Greenville Rancheria of Maidu Indians of California; 
Ione Band of Miwok Indians of California; Jackson Rancheria of Me-Wuk 
Indians of California; Mechoopda Indian Tribe of Chico Rancheria, 
California; Mooretown Rancheria of Maidu Indians of California; Paiute-
Shoshone Tribe of the Fallon Reservation and Colony, Nevada; Pyramid 
Lake Paiute Tribe of the Pyramid Lake Reservation, Nevada; Reno-Sparks 
Indian Colony, Nevada; Santa Rosa Indian Community of the Santa Rosa 
Rancheria, California (Tachi Yokut Tribe); Shingle Springs Band of 
Miwok Indians, Shingle Springs Rancheria (Verona Tract), California; 
Shoshone-Paiute Tribes of the Duck Valley Reservation, Nevada; 
Susanville Indian Rancheria, California; Tuolumne Band of Me-Wuk 
Indians of the Tuolumne Rancheria of California; United Auburn Indian 
Community of the Auburn Rancheria of California; Walker River Paiute 
Tribe of the Walker River Reservation, Nevada; Winnemucca Indian Colony 
of Nevada; and Yerington Paiute Tribe of the Yerington Colony & 
Campbell Ranch,

[[Page 5838]]

Nevada that this notice has been published.

    Dated: January 31, 2012.
Sherry Hutt,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2012-2526 Filed 2-3-12; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-P