Establishment of Everglades Headwaters National Wildlife Refuge and Conservation Area, 2754-2755 [2012-1019]

Download as PDF mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES 2754 Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 12 / Thursday, January 19, 2012 / Notices second revision available for public comment (70 FR 49668). We have considered information we received from public comments and peer reviewers in our preparation of the recovery plan, and have summarized that information in an appendix of the approved recovery plan. We welcome continuing public comment on this recovery plan, and we will consider all substantive comments on an ongoing basis to inform the implementation of recovery activities and future updates to the recovery plan. The four species of waterbirds addressed in the recovery plan occurred historically on all of the main Hawaiian Islands except Lanai and Kahoolawe. Currently, Hawaiian ducks are found on the islands of Niihau, Kauai, Oahu, Maui, and Hawaii; Hawaiian coots and Hawaiiian stilts are found on all of the main Hawaiian Islands except Kahoolawe; and Hawaiian common moorhens are found only on the islands of Kauai and Oahu. These species use a variety of wetland habitats, including freshwater marshes and ponds, coastal estuaries and ponds, artificial reservoirs, taro patches, irrigation ditches, sewage treatment ponds, and, in the case of the Hawaiian duck, montane streams and swamplands. Historically, the primary cause of population declines for the endangered Hawaiian waterbirds has been loss of wetland habitat. Other factors that have contributed to waterbird population declines, and which continue to be detrimental, include predation by introduced animals, altered hydrology, grazing, alteration of habitat by invasive nonnative plants, disease, and possibly environmental contaminants. Hunting in the late 1800s and early 1900s took a heavy toll on Hawaiian duck populations and, to a lesser extent, populations of the other three endemic waterbirds. Currently, predation by introduced animals may be the greatest threat to the coot, moorhen, and stilt; hybridization with feral mallards is the most serious threat to the Hawaiian duck. The recovery of the endangered waterbirds focuses on the following objectives: (1) Increasing population numbers to be consistently stable or increasing, with a minimum of 2,000 birds for each species; (2) establishing multiple, self-sustaining breeding populations throughout each species’ historical range; (3) establishing and protecting a network of both core and supporting wetlands that are managed as habitat suitable for waterbirds, including the maintenance of appropriate hydrological conditions and control of invasive nonnative plants; (4) VerDate Mar<15>2010 16:21 Jan 18, 2012 Jkt 226001 eliminating or controlling the threats posed by introduced predators, avian diseases, and contaminants; and (5) for the Hawaiian duck, removing the threat of hybridization with feral mallards. Authority: The authority for this action is section 4(f) of the Endangered Species Act, 16 U.S.C. 1533(f). Dated: October 28, 2011. Richard R. Hannan, Acting Regional Director, Region 1, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. [FR Doc. 2012–926 Filed 1–18–12; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4310–55–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service [FWS–R4–R–2011–N241; FXRS12650400000S3–123–FF04R02000] Establishment of Everglades Headwaters National Wildlife Refuge and Conservation Area Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: The Director of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) has approved the establishment of the Everglades Headwaters National Wildlife Refuge and Conservation Area in Polk, Osceola, Highlands, and Okeechobee Counties, Florida. The Service establishes the Refuge and Conservation Area in order to support a connected conservation landscape; to provide quality habitats for native wildlife diversity and at-risk species; to enhance water quality, quantity, and storage; and to provide opportunities for wildlife-dependent recreation. DATES: This action was effective on December 16, 2011. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. Cheri M. Ehrhardt, Natural Resource Planner, at (321) 861–2368 (telephone) or Mr. Charlie Pelizza, Refuge Manager, at (772) 562–3909, extension 244 (telephone). SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The establishment of the Everglades Headwaters National Wildlife Refuge and Conservation Area will protect approximately 150,000 acres in central and south Florida, helping to protect and restore one of the great grassland and savanna landscapes of eastern North America, conserving one of the nation’s prime areas of biological diversity. It will also help to address the threats from habitat fragmentation and urban development, altered ecological processes, and impacts from global climate change. The Service will work SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00071 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 with willing landowners to create a 100,000-acre conservation area through conservation easements or other lessthan-fee-title means, and a 50,000-acre national wildlife refuge. The authorities to establish and manage the Everglades Headwaters National Wildlife Refuge and Conservation Area are the National Wildlife Refuge System Administration Act [16 U.S.C. 668dd(a)(2)], Endangered Species Act (16 U.S.C. 1534), Emergency Wetlands Resources Act [16 U.S.C. 3901(b), 100 Stat. 3583], Migratory Bird Conservation Act (16 U.S.C. 715d), Fish and Wildlife Act [16 U.S.C. 742f(a)(4)], and Refuge Recreation Act (16 U.S.C. 460k–460k–4). Working with conservation land managers across this landscape, the Service will: (1) Manage the refuge and employ appropriate conditions for the conservation area to support a more connected and functional conservation landscape that will provide effective habitat connections between existing conservation areas and allow habitats and species to shift in response to urban development pressures and global climate change; (2) provide a wide range of quality Kissimmee River Basin habitats to support migratory birds, Federal- and State-listed species, Statedesignated species of special concern, and native wildlife diversity; (3) contribute to water quality, water quantity, and water storage capacity of the upper Everglades watershed to complement Everglades restoration goals and objectives and water quality and supply for central and south Florida; and (4) provide opportunities for hunting, fishing, wildlife observation, wildlife photography, and environmental education and interpretation, while increasing knowledge of and support for conservation of the important grassland and savanna landscape of the headwaters of the Everglades. Several uses were evaluated in the interim compatibility determinations and determined to be compatible for the refuge. These included hunting, fishing, environmental education and interpretation, wildlife observation and photography, research, camping, hiking, horseback riding, bicycling, grazing, and off-road vehicle use (on designated roads and trails to support hunting and research). The Service is working with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission to establish a memorandum of understanding to also employ appropriate State wildlife management areas for hunting on properties acquired for the refuge. On September 8, 2011, the Service published a Federal Register notice (76 E:\FR\FM\19JAN1.SGM 19JAN1 Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 12 / Thursday, January 19, 2012 / Notices FR 55699) announcing the proposed establishment of the Everglades Headwaters National Wildlife Refuge and Conservation Area, and the release for public review and comment of the Draft Land Protection Plan and Draft Environmental Assessment in accordance with National Environmental Policy Act (40 CFR 1506.6 (b)) requirements. On October 26, 2011, the Service published a Federal Register notice (76 FR 66321) announcing the extension of the comment deadline to November 25, 2011. With this extension, the public review and comment period on the Draft Land Protection Plan and Draft Environmental Assessment totaled 79 days. Based on the documentation in the Final Land Protection Plan and Final Environmental Assessment, the Regional Director of the Southeast Region of the Service signed a Finding of No Significant Impact on December 9, 2011. Along with the interim compatibility determinations, we have developed a Conceptual Management Plan, which will serve as an interim management plan until the Service develops a Comprehensive Conservation Plan and/or appropriate step-down management plans. Authority This notice is published under the authority of the National Wildlife Refuge System Improvement Act of 1997, Public Law 105–57. Daniel M. Ashe, Director, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. [FR Doc. 2012–1019 Filed 1–18–12; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4310–55–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management [LLES956000 L14200000.BK0000] Eastern States: Filing of Plats of Survey; Alabama and Minnesota Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) will file the plats of survey of the lands described below in the BLM-Eastern States office in Springfield, Virginia, 30 calendar days from the date of publication in the Federal Register. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Bureau of Land Management-Eastern States, 7450 Boston Boulevard, Springfield, Virginia 22153. Attn: mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES SUMMARY: VerDate Mar<15>2010 16:21 Jan 18, 2012 Jkt 226001 Dominica Van Koten. Persons who use a telecommunications device for the deaf (TDD) may call the Federal Information Relay Service (FIRS) at 1– (800) 877–8339 to contact the above individual during normal business hours. The FIRS is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, to leave a message or question with the above individual. You will receive a reply during normal business hours. These surveys were requested by the Bureau of Indian Affairs. The lands surveyed are: SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: St. Stephens Meridian, Alabama T. 2 N., R. 6 E. The plat of survey represents the dependent resurvey of a portion of the subdivisional lines and the survey of Tract No. 10, land held in trust for the Poarch Band of Creek Indians, in Sections 29 and 29, in Township 2 North, Range 6 East, of the St. Stephens Meridian, in the State of Alabama, and was accepted December 20, 2011. Fourth Principal Meridian, Minnesota T. 144 N., R 38 W. The plat of survey represents the corrective dependent resurvey of a portion of the West boundary and the dependent resurvey of a portion of the East and South boundaries and a portion of the subdivisional lines and the survey of the subdivision of Sections 21, 25, 28, 30, 31, 33, and 36, in Township 144 North, Range 38 West, of the Fifth Principal Meridian, in the State of Minnesota, and was accepted December 20, 2011. We will place copies of the plats we described in the open files. They will be available to the public as a matter of information. If BLM receives a protest against a survey, as shown on the plat, prior to the date of the official filing, we will stay the filing pending our consideration of the protest. We will not officially file the plats until the day after we have accepted or dismissed all protests and they have become final, including decisions on appeals. Dated: January 10, 2012. Dominica Van Koten, Chief Cadastral Surveyor. [FR Doc. 2012–917 Filed 1–18–12; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4310–GJ–P PO 00000 Frm 00072 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 2755 DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management [LLCAD00000 L19900000.AL0000] Call for Nominations for the Bureau of Land Management’s California Desert District Advisory Council Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: The Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) California Desert District is soliciting nominations from the public for six members of its California Desert District Advisory Council (Council) to serve 3-year terms. Council members provide advice and recommendations to the BLM on the management of public lands in southern California. DATES: Nominations must be submitted within 45 days from the date of this notice. SUMMARY: Nominations should be sent to Teresa Raml, District Manager, Bureau of Land Management, California Desert District Office, 22835 Calle San Juan De Los Lagos, Moreno Valley, California 92553. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: David Briery, BLM California Desert District External Affairs, (951) 697– 5220. ADDRESSES: The Council comprises 15 private individuals who represent different interests and advise BLM officials on policies and programs concerning the management of 11 million acres of public land in southern California. The Council meets in formal session three to four times each year in various locations throughout the BLM’s California Desert District. Council members serve without compensation. Members serve 3-year terms and may be nominated for reappointment for additional 3-year terms. Section 309 of the Federal Land Policy and Management Act (FLPMA) directs the Secretary of the Interior to involve the public in planning and issues related to management of BLMadministered lands. The Secretary also selects Council nominees consistent with the requirements of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (FACA), which requires nominees appointed to the Council be balanced in terms of points of view and representative of the various interests concerned with the management of the public lands. The Council also is balanced geographically, and the BLM will try to SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: E:\FR\FM\19JAN1.SGM 19JAN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 77, Number 12 (Thursday, January 19, 2012)]
[Notices]
[Pages 2754-2755]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2012-1019]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

Fish and Wildlife Service

[FWS-R4-R-2011-N241; FXRS12650400000S3-123-FF04R02000]


Establishment of Everglades Headwaters National Wildlife Refuge 
and Conservation Area

AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The Director of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) 
has approved the establishment of the Everglades Headwaters National 
Wildlife Refuge and Conservation Area in Polk, Osceola, Highlands, and 
Okeechobee Counties, Florida. The Service establishes the Refuge and 
Conservation Area in order to support a connected conservation 
landscape; to provide quality habitats for native wildlife diversity 
and at-risk species; to enhance water quality, quantity, and storage; 
and to provide opportunities for wildlife-dependent recreation.

DATES: This action was effective on December 16, 2011.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. Cheri M. Ehrhardt, Natural 
Resource Planner, at (321) 861-2368 (telephone) or Mr. Charlie Pelizza, 
Refuge Manager, at (772) 562-3909, extension 244 (telephone).

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The establishment of the Everglades 
Headwaters National Wildlife Refuge and Conservation Area will protect 
approximately 150,000 acres in central and south Florida, helping to 
protect and restore one of the great grassland and savanna landscapes 
of eastern North America, conserving one of the nation's prime areas of 
biological diversity. It will also help to address the threats from 
habitat fragmentation and urban development, altered ecological 
processes, and impacts from global climate change. The Service will 
work with willing landowners to create a 100,000-acre conservation area 
through conservation easements or other less-than-fee-title means, and 
a 50,000-acre national wildlife refuge.
    The authorities to establish and manage the Everglades Headwaters 
National Wildlife Refuge and Conservation Area are the National 
Wildlife Refuge System Administration Act [16 U.S.C. 668dd(a)(2)], 
Endangered Species Act (16 U.S.C. 1534), Emergency Wetlands Resources 
Act [16 U.S.C. 3901(b), 100 Stat. 3583], Migratory Bird Conservation 
Act (16 U.S.C. 715d), Fish and Wildlife Act [16 U.S.C. 742f(a)(4)], and 
Refuge Recreation Act (16 U.S.C. 460k-460k-4).
    Working with conservation land managers across this landscape, the 
Service will: (1) Manage the refuge and employ appropriate conditions 
for the conservation area to support a more connected and functional 
conservation landscape that will provide effective habitat connections 
between existing conservation areas and allow habitats and species to 
shift in response to urban development pressures and global climate 
change; (2) provide a wide range of quality Kissimmee River Basin 
habitats to support migratory birds, Federal- and State-listed species, 
State-designated species of special concern, and native wildlife 
diversity; (3) contribute to water quality, water quantity, and water 
storage capacity of the upper Everglades watershed to complement 
Everglades restoration goals and objectives and water quality and 
supply for central and south Florida; and (4) provide opportunities for 
hunting, fishing, wildlife observation, wildlife photography, and 
environmental education and interpretation, while increasing knowledge 
of and support for conservation of the important grassland and savanna 
landscape of the headwaters of the Everglades.
    Several uses were evaluated in the interim compatibility 
determinations and determined to be compatible for the refuge. These 
included hunting, fishing, environmental education and interpretation, 
wildlife observation and photography, research, camping, hiking, 
horseback riding, bicycling, grazing, and off-road vehicle use (on 
designated roads and trails to support hunting and research). The 
Service is working with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation 
Commission to establish a memorandum of understanding to also employ 
appropriate State wildlife management areas for hunting on properties 
acquired for the refuge.
    On September 8, 2011, the Service published a Federal Register 
notice (76

[[Page 2755]]

FR 55699) announcing the proposed establishment of the Everglades 
Headwaters National Wildlife Refuge and Conservation Area, and the 
release for public review and comment of the Draft Land Protection Plan 
and Draft Environmental Assessment in accordance with National 
Environmental Policy Act (40 CFR 1506.6 (b)) requirements. On October 
26, 2011, the Service published a Federal Register notice (76 FR 66321) 
announcing the extension of the comment deadline to November 25, 2011. 
With this extension, the public review and comment period on the Draft 
Land Protection Plan and Draft Environmental Assessment totaled 79 
days.
    Based on the documentation in the Final Land Protection Plan and 
Final Environmental Assessment, the Regional Director of the Southeast 
Region of the Service signed a Finding of No Significant Impact on 
December 9, 2011. Along with the interim compatibility determinations, 
we have developed a Conceptual Management Plan, which will serve as an 
interim management plan until the Service develops a Comprehensive 
Conservation Plan and/or appropriate step-down management plans.

Authority

    This notice is published under the authority of the National 
Wildlife Refuge System Improvement Act of 1997, Public Law 105-57.

Daniel M. Ashe,
Director, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
[FR Doc. 2012-1019 Filed 1-18-12; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4310-55-P