Lewis and Clark National Wildlife Refuge and Julia Butler Hansen Refuge for the Columbian White-Tailed Deer, Wahkiakum County, WA, and Clatsop and Columbia Counties, OR; Record of Decision for Final Environmental Impact Statement, 77247-77249 [2011-31811]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 238 / Monday, December 12, 2011 / Notices 77247 A—No action alternative B—Optimal habitat management and public use (proposed action) alternative C—Maximal habitat management and public use alternative Visitor Services Issue 2: Environmental Education. Provide environmental education as requested and as staff time permits. Develop an environmental education program and promote in local school districts. Visitor Services Issue 3: Interpretation. Facilities Issue 1: Roads ........... Host annual Attwater’s PrairieChicken Festival; interpretive signage at headquarters and along auto-tour route. Cooperate with county maintenance personnel for refuge entrance road, and maintain other refuge roads. Facilities Issue 2: Development of Administrative Complex. Administrative operations conducted out of three portable structures. Same as Alternative A; plus add interpretive signage and kiosk to new auto-tour route and new trail; expand interpretive opportunities using recent technologies. Same as Alternative A; plus acquire jurisdiction and maintenance responsibilities of existing refuge entrance road and widen to two full lanes; bury powerline along entrance road; evaluate and remove services roads where necessary. Develop and approve site plan for new integrated administrative complex. Develop an outdoor classroom through partnerships with local schools, volunteers, and friends group. Same as Alternative B. Issue topic • Attwater Prairie Chicken NWR Headquarters Office, 1206 APCNWR Road, Eagle Lake, TX 77434 between the hours of 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. Public Availability of Documents In addition to any methods in you can view or obtain documents at the following locations: ADDRESSES, Same as Alternative B. Same as Alternative B. • Our Web site: http://www.fws.gov/ southwest/refuges/Plan/ publicinvolvement.html. • At the following public libraries: Library Address Phone No. Eula and David Wintermann Library ........................................ Nesbitt Memorial Library ........................................................... Virgil and Josephine Gordon Memorial Library ........................ 101 North Walnut Ave., Eagle Lake, TX 77434 ...................... 529 Washington Street, Columbus, TX 78934 ........................ 917 North Circle Dr., Sealy, TX 77474 .................................... (979) 234–5411 (979) 732–3392 (979) 885–7469 Submitting Comments/Issues for Comment cannot guarantee that we will be able to do so. We consider comments substantive if they: • Question, with reasonable basis, the accuracy of the information in the document; • Question, with reasonable basis, the adequacy of the environmental assessment (EA); • Present reasonable alternatives other than those presented in the EA; and/or • Provide new or additional information relevant to the assessment. Dated: November 14, 2011. Joy Nicholopoulos, Acting Regional Director, Southwest Region. Next Steps Lewis and Clark National Wildlife Refuge and Julia Butler Hansen Refuge for the Columbian White-Tailed Deer, Wahkiakum County, WA, and Clatsop and Columbia Counties, OR; Record of Decision for Final Environmental Impact Statement After this comment period ends, we will analyze the comments and address them in the form of a final CCP and finding of no significant impact. jlentini on DSK4TPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Public Availability of Comments Before including your address, phone number, email address, or other personal identifying information in your comment, you should be aware that your entire comment—including your personal identifying information—may be made publicly available at any time. While you can ask us in your comment to withhold your personal identifying information from public review, we VerDate Mar<15>2010 15:55 Dec 09, 2011 Jkt 226001 [FR Doc. 2011–31808 Filed 12–9–11; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4310–55–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service [FWS–R1–R–2010–N243; 1265–0000–10137– S3] AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of availability. SUMMARY: We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), announce the availability of the record of decision (ROD) for the final environmental impact statement (EIS) for the Lewis and Clark National Wildlife Refuge and Julia PO 00000 Frm 00045 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Butler Hansen Refuge for the Columbian White-tailed Deer (Refuges). We completed a thorough analysis of the environmental, social, and economic considerations and presented it in our final EIS, which we released to the public on August 13, 2010. DATES: The Acting Regional Director, Pacific Region, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, signed the ROD on September 23, 2010. We can implement the CCP immediately. ADDRESSES: You may view or obtain copies of the final CCP and ROD by any of the following methods: Agency Web Site: Download a copy of the document(s) at http://www.fws.gov/ pacific/planning/. Email: FW1PlanningComments@fws.gov. Include ‘‘Lewis and Clark and Julia Butler Hansen ROD’’ in the subject line of the message. Mail: Willapa National Wildlife Refuge Complex, 3888 SR 101, Ilwaco, WA 98624. Fax: (360) 484–3109. In person viewing: Copies of the final CCP/EIS may be viewed at the Willapa National Wildlife Refuge Complex, 3888 SR 101, Ilwaco, WA 98624; and the Julia Butler Hansen Refuge for the Columbian E:\FR\FM\12DEN1.SGM 12DEN1 77248 Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 238 / Monday, December 12, 2011 / Notices White-tailed Deer, 46 Steamboat Slough Road, Cathlamet, WA 98612. Local Libraries: The final documents are also available for review at the libraries listed under SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Charlie Stenvall, (360) 484–3482. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: jlentini on DSK4TPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Introduction This notice completes the CCP process for the Refuges. We started the process in a Federal Register notice (71 FR 55214; September 21, 2006). We released the draft CCP/EIS to the public, announcing and requesting comments in a notice of availability in the Federal Register (75 FR 6694; February 10, 2010). We announced the availability of the final CCP/EIS in the Federal Register (75 FR 49516) on August 13, 2010. The Lewis and Clark Refuge was established in 1972 to preserve vital fish and wildlife habitat of the Columbia River estuary. The Refuge’s islands in the Columbia River encompass a variety of habitat types, from tidal sand flats and marshes to forested swamps. This combination of habitats supports large numbers of waterfowl, gulls, terns, wading birds, shorebirds, and a variety of raptors and songbirds. The Lewis and Clark Refuge’s islands are accessible by boat, and include 18 named islands, a number of unnamed islands, and marshes stretching over 25 miles of the Columbia River. The Julia Butler Hansen Refuge for the Columbian White-tailed Deer was established in 1971 to protect and manage the endangered Columbian white-tailed deer (CWT deer). The Refuge contains over 6,000 acres of pastures, forested tidal swamps, brushy woodlots, marshes, and sloughs along the Columbia River. In accordance with National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) (40 CFR 1506.6(b)) requirements, this notice announces the availability of the ROD for the final EIS and CCP for the Refuges. We completed a thorough analysis of the environmental, social, and economic considerations, which we included in the final CCP/EIS. We included two alternatives for the Lewis and Clark Refuge and three alternatives for the Julia Butler Hansen Refuge. For Lewis and Clark Refuge, Alternative 1 was the no-action alternative and Alternative 2 was the preferred alternative. For Julia Butler Hansen Refuge, Alternative 1 was our no-action alternative, Alternative 2 was our preferred alternative, and Alternative 3 was similar to Alternative 2 except that VerDate Mar<15>2010 15:55 Dec 09, 2011 Jkt 226001 the timeframe for predator management would have been limited to January through August. For both Refuges, we selected Alternative 2, our preferred alternative, for implementation. The ROD documents our selections. The CCP will guide us in managing and administering the Refuges for the next 15 years. For each of the two refuges, the selected alternative, as we described in the final EIS and ROD, is the foundation for the CCP. Background The National Wildlife Refuge System Administration Act of 1966 (16 U.S.C. 668dd–668ee) (Refuge Administration Act), as amended by the National Wildlife Refuge System Improvement Act of 1997, requires us to develop a CCP for each refuge. The purpose for developing a CCP is to provide refuge managers with a 15-year plan for achieving refuge purposes and contributing toward the mission of the National Wildlife Refuge System, consistent with sound principles of fish and wildlife management, conservation, legal mandates, and our policies. We will review and update the CCP at least every 15 years in accordance with the Refuge Administration Act. CCP Alternatives and Selected Alternatives We identified several issues in our draft CCP/EIS. To address these, we developed and evaluated management alternatives for the Refuges as required under the Council on Environmental Quality’s regulations (40 CFR 1500– 1508). A summary of each alternative follows. Lewis and Clark Refuge Alternative 1 No changes to the Refuge’s current management programs would occur under Alternative 1. Habitat management would consist of monitoring Refuge islands and treating invasive plant infestations as funding allows. Refuge staff members would continue to protect and maintain wintering and foraging habitat for migratory waterfowl, and nesting and roosting habitat for bald eagles. Hunting, fishing, wildlife observation, and photography would continue at current levels. Lewis and Clark Refuge Alternative 2 Under Alternative 2 (the preferred alternative), current wildlife and habitat management would be maintained and improved. Key Refuge enhancements would include establishing or expanding partnerships for managing invasive species, recruiting graduate students to conduct wildlife and habitat PO 00000 Frm 00046 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 research, and exploring options for managing Oregon Department of State Lands property within the approved Refuge boundary. The Refuge would also expand opportunities for wildlife observation and photography, evaluate the Refuge’s Wilderness Study Area (WSA) for a wilderness designation proposal, and work with partners to ensure that dredge-spoil islands provide benefits for wildlife. Julia Butler Hansen Refuge Alternative 1 Under Alternative 1, no changes to the current Refuge management programs would occur at Julia Butler Hansen Refuge. We would continue to maintain and protect habitats, establish early successional riparian forest habitat, maintain predator management January through April, and continue public use programs. Julia Butler Hansen Refuge Alternative 2 Refuge management changes under Alternative 2 (the preferred alternative) would include opening Crims and Price Islands to waterfowl hunting, closing portions of Refuge lands along the lower Elochoman River to waterfowl hunting for public safety purposes, evaluating the Refuge’s WSA for a wilderness designation proposal, developing two trails, and improving interpretive media. To achieve CWT deer recovery goals, predator management would take place as needed, year round, and we would expand the CWT deer population by establishing an experimental population upriver. Julia Butler Hansen Refuge Alternative 3 Refuge management changes under Alternative 3 would include opening Crims and Price Islands to waterfowl hunting, closing portions of Refuge lands along the lower Elochoman River to waterfowl hunting for public safety purposes, studying potential wilderness lands, developing a bicycling and hiking trail, installing interpretive panels, and developing curriculum for Refuge study sites. To achieve CWT deer recovery goals, predator management would take place January through August under this alternative. After considering the comments we received, we have selected Alternative 2 for each Refuge. Alternative 2 was selected for implementation for the Lewis and Clark Refuge because it will best achieve Refuge purposes and fulfill the Service’s mission. It is consistent with the principles of sound wildlife management, and will facilitate priority public uses that are compatible with the purposes of the Refuge. This alternative is based on a land management approach that protects natural E:\FR\FM\12DEN1.SGM 12DEN1 Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 238 / Monday, December 12, 2011 / Notices resources, habitats, and landscapes, while allowing for recreational public uses. This management approach will be effective for protecting Refuge resources, improving public information, working with our partners, and providing research opportunities on the Refuge for graduate students. Studying the Refuge islands’ 6,745-acre WSA will enable us to assess a proposal for possible wilderness designation. Alternative 2 was selected for implementation for the Julia Butler Hansen Refuge because it will best achieve the Refuge purposes and fulfill the Service’s mission. It is consistent with the principles of sound wildlife management, and will facilitate priority public uses that are compatible with the purposes of the Refuge. We will incorporate several new components to current management by addressing a variety of resource needs, while improving CWT deer protection with a focus on recovery. Recovery measures include an opportunity for an experimental CWT deer population upriver, expanded habitat restoration, and increased predator control, as needed, year-round. Other actions include conducting research for management purposes and improving priority public use opportunities. The combination of these components will contribute to achieving the Refuge’s vision, purposes, and goals. Implementing this alternative will provide an achievable balance of opportunities for priority public uses (hunting, fishing, wildlife observation and photography, and environmental education and interpretation), while providing sufficient protection and sanctuary areas for endangered CWT deer, other wildlife, and their habitats. Studying the 1,344-acre WSA for Wallace and Hunting Islands will enable us to assess a proposal for wilderness designation. Public Availability of Documents In addition to the methods in you can view our CCP at the following libraries: • Blanch Bradley Library, 100 Main Street, Cathlamet, WA 98612. • Astoria Public Library, 450 10th Street, Astoria, OR 97103. • Clatskanie Library District, 11 Lillich Street, Clatskanie, OR 97016. • Ilwaco Timberline Regional Library, 158 1st Ave., Ilwaco, WA 98624. • Longview Public Library, 1600 Louisiana Street, Longview, WA 98632. • Fort Vancouver Regional Library, 1007 E. Mill Plain Blvd., Vancouver, WA 98663. jlentini on DSK4TPTVN1PROD with NOTICES ADDRESSES, VerDate Mar<15>2010 15:55 Dec 09, 2011 Jkt 226001 77249 Dated: November 30, 2011. Richard Hannan, Acting Regional Director, Region 1, Portland, Oregon. harm, and an overview of public involvement in the decision-making process. [FR Doc. 2011–31811 Filed 12–9–11; 8:45 am] FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Steve Iobst, Deputy Superintendent, Yellowstone National Park, (307) 344– 2002. BILLING CODE 4310–55–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Winter Use Plan, Final Environmental Impact Statement Record of Decision, Yellowstone National Park, Idaho, Montana, and Wyoming National Park Service, Interior. Notice of availability of a Record of Decision on the Final Environmental Impact Statement for a Winter Use Plan, Yellowstone National Park. AGENCY: ACTION: Pursuant to Sec. 102(2)(C) of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, 83 Stat. 852, 853, codified as amended at 42 U.S.C. 4332(2)(C), the National Park Service announces the availability of the Record of Decision for the Winter Use Plan for Yellowstone National Park, located in Idaho, Montana, and Wyoming. On December 5, 2011, the Director, Intermountain Region, approved the Record of Decision for the plan. The National Park Service (NPS) will implement this Decision through regulation that will take effect on December 15, 2011. The Record of Decision selects Alternative 8 for implementation. The NPS will allow oversnow vehicle use in the park for the winter of 2011/2012 at the same levels that were allowed under the interim regulation in place for the winters of 2009/2010 and 2010/2011. Up to 318 commercially guided, bestavailable-technology snowmobiles and 78 commercially guided snowcoaches will be allowed in the park per day. All snowmobiles and snowcoaches will be 100% commercially guided and Sylvan Pass will remain open under the same conditions as the past two winter seasons. The Final Environmental Impact Statement analyzed eight alternatives, including a no-action alternative. The full range of foreseeable environmental consequences was assessed, and appropriate mitigating measures were identified. The Record of Decision includes a statement of the decision made, synopses of other alternatives considered, the basis for the decision, a description of the environmentally preferred alternative, a listing of measures to minimize environmental SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00047 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Copies of the Record of Decision may be obtained from the contact listed above or online at http://parkplanning.nps.gov/yell. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Dated: December 5, 2011. John Wessels, Regional Director, Intermountain Region, National Park Service. [FR Doc. 2011–31780 Filed 12–9–11; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–CT–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [NPS–WASO–NRNHL–1111–8950; 2200– 3200–665] National Register of Historic Places; Notification of Pending Nominations and Related Actions Nominations for the following properties being considered for listing or related actions in the National Register were received by the National Park Service before November 19, 2011. Pursuant to section 60.13 of 36 CFR Part 60, written comments are being accepted concerning the significance of the nominated properties under the National Register criteria for evaluation. Comments may be forwarded by United States Postal Service, to the National Register of Historic Places, National Park Service, 1849 C St. NW., MS 2280, Washington, DC 20240; by all other carriers, National Register of Historic Places, National Park Service, 1201 Eye St. NW., 8th floor, Washington, DC 20005; or by fax, (202) 371–6447. Written or faxed comments should be submitted by December 27, 2011. Before including your address, phone number, email address, or other personal identifying information in your comment, you should be aware that your entire comment—including your personal identifying information—may be made publicly available at any time. While you can ask us in your comment to withhold your personal identifying information from public review, we E:\FR\FM\12DEN1.SGM 12DEN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 76, Number 238 (Monday, December 12, 2011)]
[Notices]
[Pages 77247-77249]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2011-31811]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

Fish and Wildlife Service

[FWS-R1-R-2010-N243; 1265-0000-10137-S3]


Lewis and Clark National Wildlife Refuge and Julia Butler Hansen 
Refuge for the Columbian White-Tailed Deer, Wahkiakum County, WA, and 
Clatsop and Columbia Counties, OR; Record of Decision for Final 
Environmental Impact Statement

AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice of availability.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), announce the 
availability of the record of decision (ROD) for the final 
environmental impact statement (EIS) for the Lewis and Clark National 
Wildlife Refuge and Julia Butler Hansen Refuge for the Columbian White-
tailed Deer (Refuges). We completed a thorough analysis of the 
environmental, social, and economic considerations and presented it in 
our final EIS, which we released to the public on August 13, 2010.

DATES: The Acting Regional Director, Pacific Region, U.S. Fish and 
Wildlife Service, signed the ROD on September 23, 2010. We can 
implement the CCP immediately.

ADDRESSES: You may view or obtain copies of the final CCP and ROD by 
any of the following methods:
    Agency Web Site: Download a copy of the document(s) at http://www.fws.gov/pacific/planning/.
    Email: FW1PlanningComments@fws.gov. Include ``Lewis and Clark and 
Julia Butler Hansen ROD'' in the subject line of the message.
    Mail: Willapa National Wildlife Refuge Complex, 3888 SR 101, 
Ilwaco, WA 98624.
    Fax: (360) 484-3109.
    In person viewing: Copies of the final CCP/EIS may be viewed at the 
Willapa National Wildlife Refuge Complex, 3888 SR 101, Ilwaco, WA 
98624; and the Julia Butler Hansen Refuge for the Columbian

[[Page 77248]]

White-tailed Deer, 46 Steamboat Slough Road, Cathlamet, WA 98612.
    Local Libraries: The final documents are also available for review 
at the libraries listed under SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Charlie Stenvall, (360) 484-3482.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

Introduction

    This notice completes the CCP process for the Refuges. We started 
the process in a Federal Register notice (71 FR 55214; September 21, 
2006). We released the draft CCP/EIS to the public, announcing and 
requesting comments in a notice of availability in the Federal Register 
(75 FR 6694; February 10, 2010). We announced the availability of the 
final CCP/EIS in the Federal Register (75 FR 49516) on August 13, 2010.
    The Lewis and Clark Refuge was established in 1972 to preserve 
vital fish and wildlife habitat of the Columbia River estuary. The 
Refuge's islands in the Columbia River encompass a variety of habitat 
types, from tidal sand flats and marshes to forested swamps. This 
combination of habitats supports large numbers of waterfowl, gulls, 
terns, wading birds, shorebirds, and a variety of raptors and 
songbirds. The Lewis and Clark Refuge's islands are accessible by boat, 
and include 18 named islands, a number of unnamed islands, and marshes 
stretching over 25 miles of the Columbia River.
    The Julia Butler Hansen Refuge for the Columbian White-tailed Deer 
was established in 1971 to protect and manage the endangered Columbian 
white-tailed deer (CWT deer). The Refuge contains over 6,000 acres of 
pastures, forested tidal swamps, brushy woodlots, marshes, and sloughs 
along the Columbia River.
    In accordance with National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) (40 CFR 
1506.6(b)) requirements, this notice announces the availability of the 
ROD for the final EIS and CCP for the Refuges. We completed a thorough 
analysis of the environmental, social, and economic considerations, 
which we included in the final CCP/EIS. We included two alternatives 
for the Lewis and Clark Refuge and three alternatives for the Julia 
Butler Hansen Refuge. For Lewis and Clark Refuge, Alternative 1 was the 
no-action alternative and Alternative 2 was the preferred alternative. 
For Julia Butler Hansen Refuge, Alternative 1 was our no-action 
alternative, Alternative 2 was our preferred alternative, and 
Alternative 3 was similar to Alternative 2 except that the timeframe 
for predator management would have been limited to January through 
August. For both Refuges, we selected Alternative 2, our preferred 
alternative, for implementation. The ROD documents our selections.
    The CCP will guide us in managing and administering the Refuges for 
the next 15 years. For each of the two refuges, the selected 
alternative, as we described in the final EIS and ROD, is the 
foundation for the CCP.

Background

    The National Wildlife Refuge System Administration Act of 1966 (16 
U.S.C. 668dd-668ee) (Refuge Administration Act), as amended by the 
National Wildlife Refuge System Improvement Act of 1997, requires us to 
develop a CCP for each refuge. The purpose for developing a CCP is to 
provide refuge managers with a 15-year plan for achieving refuge 
purposes and contributing toward the mission of the National Wildlife 
Refuge System, consistent with sound principles of fish and wildlife 
management, conservation, legal mandates, and our policies. We will 
review and update the CCP at least every 15 years in accordance with 
the Refuge Administration Act.

CCP Alternatives and Selected Alternatives

    We identified several issues in our draft CCP/EIS. To address 
these, we developed and evaluated management alternatives for the 
Refuges as required under the Council on Environmental Quality's 
regulations (40 CFR 1500-1508). A summary of each alternative follows.

Lewis and Clark Refuge Alternative 1

    No changes to the Refuge's current management programs would occur 
under Alternative 1. Habitat management would consist of monitoring 
Refuge islands and treating invasive plant infestations as funding 
allows. Refuge staff members would continue to protect and maintain 
wintering and foraging habitat for migratory waterfowl, and nesting and 
roosting habitat for bald eagles. Hunting, fishing, wildlife 
observation, and photography would continue at current levels.

Lewis and Clark Refuge Alternative 2

    Under Alternative 2 (the preferred alternative), current wildlife 
and habitat management would be maintained and improved. Key Refuge 
enhancements would include establishing or expanding partnerships for 
managing invasive species, recruiting graduate students to conduct 
wildlife and habitat research, and exploring options for managing 
Oregon Department of State Lands property within the approved Refuge 
boundary. The Refuge would also expand opportunities for wildlife 
observation and photography, evaluate the Refuge's Wilderness Study 
Area (WSA) for a wilderness designation proposal, and work with 
partners to ensure that dredge-spoil islands provide benefits for 
wildlife.

Julia Butler Hansen Refuge Alternative 1

    Under Alternative 1, no changes to the current Refuge management 
programs would occur at Julia Butler Hansen Refuge. We would continue 
to maintain and protect habitats, establish early successional riparian 
forest habitat, maintain predator management January through April, and 
continue public use programs.

Julia Butler Hansen Refuge Alternative 2

    Refuge management changes under Alternative 2 (the preferred 
alternative) would include opening Crims and Price Islands to waterfowl 
hunting, closing portions of Refuge lands along the lower Elochoman 
River to waterfowl hunting for public safety purposes, evaluating the 
Refuge's WSA for a wilderness designation proposal, developing two 
trails, and improving interpretive media. To achieve CWT deer recovery 
goals, predator management would take place as needed, year round, and 
we would expand the CWT deer population by establishing an experimental 
population upriver.

Julia Butler Hansen Refuge Alternative 3

    Refuge management changes under Alternative 3 would include opening 
Crims and Price Islands to waterfowl hunting, closing portions of 
Refuge lands along the lower Elochoman River to waterfowl hunting for 
public safety purposes, studying potential wilderness lands, developing 
a bicycling and hiking trail, installing interpretive panels, and 
developing curriculum for Refuge study sites. To achieve CWT deer 
recovery goals, predator management would take place January through 
August under this alternative.
    After considering the comments we received, we have selected 
Alternative 2 for each Refuge. Alternative 2 was selected for 
implementation for the Lewis and Clark Refuge because it will best 
achieve Refuge purposes and fulfill the Service's mission. It is 
consistent with the principles of sound wildlife management, and will 
facilitate priority public uses that are compatible with the purposes 
of the Refuge. This alternative is based on a land management approach 
that protects natural

[[Page 77249]]

resources, habitats, and landscapes, while allowing for recreational 
public uses. This management approach will be effective for protecting 
Refuge resources, improving public information, working with our 
partners, and providing research opportunities on the Refuge for 
graduate students. Studying the Refuge islands' 6,745-acre WSA will 
enable us to assess a proposal for possible wilderness designation.
    Alternative 2 was selected for implementation for the Julia Butler 
Hansen Refuge because it will best achieve the Refuge purposes and 
fulfill the Service's mission. It is consistent with the principles of 
sound wildlife management, and will facilitate priority public uses 
that are compatible with the purposes of the Refuge. We will 
incorporate several new components to current management by addressing 
a variety of resource needs, while improving CWT deer protection with a 
focus on recovery. Recovery measures include an opportunity for an 
experimental CWT deer population upriver, expanded habitat restoration, 
and increased predator control, as needed, year-round. Other actions 
include conducting research for management purposes and improving 
priority public use opportunities. The combination of these components 
will contribute to achieving the Refuge's vision, purposes, and goals. 
Implementing this alternative will provide an achievable balance of 
opportunities for priority public uses (hunting, fishing, wildlife 
observation and photography, and environmental education and 
interpretation), while providing sufficient protection and sanctuary 
areas for endangered CWT deer, other wildlife, and their habitats. 
Studying the 1,344-acre WSA for Wallace and Hunting Islands will enable 
us to assess a proposal for wilderness designation.

Public Availability of Documents

    In addition to the methods in ADDRESSES, you can view our CCP at 
the following libraries:
     Blanch Bradley Library, 100 Main Street, Cathlamet, WA 
98612.
     Astoria Public Library, 450 10th Street, Astoria, OR 
97103.
     Clatskanie Library District, 11 Lillich Street, 
Clatskanie, OR 97016.
     Ilwaco Timberline Regional Library, 158 1st Ave., Ilwaco, 
WA 98624.
     Longview Public Library, 1600 Louisiana Street, Longview, 
WA 98632.
     Fort Vancouver Regional Library, 1007 E. Mill Plain Blvd., 
Vancouver, WA 98663.

    Dated: November 30, 2011.
Richard Hannan,
Acting Regional Director, Region 1, Portland, Oregon.
[FR Doc. 2011-31811 Filed 12-9-11; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4310-55-P