Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, Ajo, AZ and Arizona State Museum, Tucson, AZ, 77012-77013 [2011-31614]

Download as PDF 77012 Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 237 / Friday, December 9, 2011 / Notices DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [2253–665] Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, Ajo, AZ and Arizona State Museum, Tucson, AZ National Park Service, Interior. Notice AGENCY: ACTION: Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes, and has determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and associated funerary objects and present-day Indian tribes. Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary objects may contact Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument. Repatriation of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Indian tribes stated below may occur if no additional claimants come forward. DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes it has a cultural affiliation with the human remains and associated funerary objects should contact Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument at the address below by January 9, 2012. ADDRESSES: Lee Baiza, Superintendent, Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, 10 Organ Pipe Drive, Ajo, AZ 85321, telephone (520) 387–6849 ext. 7500. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects in the control of Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, Ajo, AZ and in the physical custody of the Arizona State Museum, Tucson, AZ. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from site AZ Y:16:002 (ASM) in Pima County, AZ. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the Superintendent, Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument. srobinson on DSK4SPTVN1PROD with NOTICES SUMMARY: Consultation A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Organ Pipe Cactus VerDate Mar<15>2010 18:35 Dec 08, 2011 Jkt 226001 National Monument and Arizona State Museum professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Ak Chin Indian Community of the Maricopa (Ak Chin) Indian Reservation, Arizona; Gila River Indian Community of the Gila River Indian Reservation, Arizona; Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Quechan Tribe of the Fort Yuma Indian Reservation, California and Arizona; and Tohono O’odham Nation of Arizona. The Cocopah Tribe of Arizona; Colorado River Indian Tribes of the Colorado River Indian Reservation, Arizona and California; Fort Mojave Indian Tribe of Arizona, California, and Nevada; Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community of the Salt River Reservation, Arizona; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico were also contacted for consultation purposes. History and Description of the Remains Between 1951 and 1954, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were removed from site AZ Y:16:002 (ASM) in Pima County, AZ. The remains were removed during archeological fieldwork under the direction of Paul H. Ezell in a cooperative project between Arizona State Museum and the National Park Service. Project collections were stored at the NPS Southwestern National Monuments Headquarters, also known as the Southwest Archaeological Center, in Globe, AZ, for analysis and report preparation. The professional report was never completed. It is unclear at what point the cremated remains came to be in collections storage at the Arizona State Museum. No known individuals were identified. The 38 associated funerary objects are 2 faunal bone fragments and 36 fragments of charcoal. Based upon the archeological context, including the presence of Tanque Verde Red-on-Brown ceramics, the remains have been determined to be Native American dating to A.D. 1150–1450, commonly known to the archeological community as the Classic Hohokam period. A relationship of shared group identity can reasonably be traced between members of the Hohokam culture and the four southern O’odham tribes of Arizona. The O’odham people comprise four Federally recognized Indian tribes (the Ak Chin Indian Community of the Maricopa (Ak Chin) Indian Reservation, Arizona; Gila River Indian Community of the Gila River Indian Reservation, Arizona; Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community of the Salt River Reservation, Arizona; and Tohono O’odham Nation of Arizona) and one Indian Group that is not PO 00000 Frm 00079 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Federally recognized, the Hia C-ed O’odham. A Hia C-ed O’odham association with lands lying directly to the west of the Ajo Mountains, including Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, is documented throughout the historic period and into the 20th century. O’odham oral histories describe the end time of the Hohokam, when O’odham armies gathered and marched on the Great House communities (e.g., Casa Grande, Pueblo Grande) and cast out the Hohokam societies there. The armies then occupied the conquered lands, intermarrying with the remnants of the Hohokam and ultimately becoming the O’odham people. Other evidence of the O’odham-Hohokam connection includes similar settlement patterns, irrigation systems, residence styles, and a possible relationship between modern O’odham kickball games and formal Hohokam ball courts. A relationship of shared group identity can also reasonably be traced between members of the Hohokam culture and the Hopi Tribe of Arizona. Hopi history is based, in large part, on clan migration narratives. The Hopi consider all of Arizona to be within traditional Hopi lands, i.e., areas in and through which Hopi clans are believed to have migrated in the past. Hopi oral history and the anthropological record show that some clans originated in the Salt-Gila region and were descended from the Hohokam. After the fall of the Great House communities, Hohokam refugees were absorbed into the Hopi culture. A relationship of shared group identity can also reasonably be traced between members of the Hohokam culture and the Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico. Zuni oral history tells of ancestral migrations and settling throughout this region in their search for the Middle Place of the World (present day Pueblo of Zuni). Elders have identified features in the area, including shrines and petroglyphs, as Zuni. Zuni ancestors left many markers of their passing including trails, habitation sites, campsites, burials, sacred shrines, and rock art. Determinations Made by Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument Officials of Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of one individual of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 38 objects described above are reasonably believed to have been placed E:\FR\FM\09DEN1.SGM 09DEN1 Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 237 / Friday, December 9, 2011 / Notices with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and the Ak Chin Indian Community of the Maricopa (Ak Chin) Indian Reservation, Arizona; Gila River Indian Community of the Gila River Indian Reservation, Arizona; Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community of the Salt River Reservation, Arizona; Tohono O’odham Nation of Arizona; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico. srobinson on DSK4SPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Additional Requestors and Disposition Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary objects should contact Lee Baiza, Superintendent, Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, 10 Organ Pipe Drive, Ajo, AZ 85321, telephone (520) 387–6849 ext. 7500 before January 9, 2012. Repatriation of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Ak Chin Indian Community of the Maricopa (Ak Chin) Indian Reservation, Arizona; Gila River Indian Community of the Gila River Indian Reservation, Arizona; Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community of the Salt River Reservation, Arizona; Tohono O’odham Nation of Arizona; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument is responsible for notifying the Ak Chin Indian Community of the Maricopa (Ak Chin) Indian Reservation, Arizona; Cocopah Tribe of Arizona; Colorado River Indian Tribes of the Colorado River Indian Reservation, Arizona and California; Fort Mojave Indian Tribe of Arizona, California, and Nevada; Gila River Indian Community of the Gila River Indian Reservation, Arizona; Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Quechan Tribe of the Fort Yuma Indian Reservation, California and Arizona; Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community of the Salt River Reservation, Arizona; Tohono O’odham Nation of Arizona; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico that this notice has been published. Dated: December 5, 2011. Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2011–31614 Filed 12–8–11; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4310–50–P VerDate Mar<15>2010 19:37 Dec 08, 2011 Jkt 226001 INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 731–TA–860 (Second Review)] Tin- and Chromium-Coated Steel Sheet From Japan; Scheduling of a Full FiveYear Review Concerning the Antidumping Duty Order United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: The Commission hereby gives notice of the scheduling of a full review pursuant to section 751(c)(5) of the Tariff Act of 1930 (19 U.S.C. § 1675(c)(5)) (the Act) to determine whether revocation of the antidumping duty order on tin- and chromium-coated steel sheet from Japan would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material injury within a reasonably foreseeable time. For further information concerning the conduct of this review and rules of general application, consult the Commission’s Rules of Practice and Procedure, part 201, subparts A through E (19 CFR part 201), and part 207, subparts A, D, E, and F (19 CFR part 207). DATES : Effective Date: December 5, 2011. SUMMARY: FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Karen Taylor (202) 708–4101), Office of Industries, U.S. International Trade Commission, 500 E Street SW., Washington, DC 20436. Hearingimpaired persons can obtain information on this matter by contacting the Commission’s TDD terminal on (202) 205–1810. Persons with mobility impairments who will need special assistance in gaining access to the Commission should contact the Office of the Secretary at (202) 205–2000. General information concerning the Commission may also be obtained by accessing its Internet server (http:// www.usitc.gov). The public record for this review may be viewed on the Commission’s electronic docket (EDIS) at http://edis.usitc.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Background.—On September 6, 2011, the Commission determined that responses to its notice of institution of the subject five-year review were such that a full review pursuant to section 751(c)(5) of the Act should proceed (76 FR 58536, September 21, 2011). A record of the Commissioners’ votes, the Commission’s statement on adequacy, and any individual Commissioner’s statements are available from the Office of the Secretary and at the Commission’s Web site. PO 00000 Frm 00080 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 77013 Participation in the review and public service list.—Persons, including industrial users of the subject merchandise and, if the merchandise is sold at the retail level, representative consumer organizations, wishing to participate in this review as parties must file an entry of appearance with the Secretary to the Commission, as provided in section 201.11 of the Commission’s rules, by 45 days after publication of this notice. A party that filed a notice of appearance following publication of the Commission’s notice of institution of the review need not file an additional notice of appearance. The Secretary will maintain a public service list containing the names and addresses of all persons, or their representatives, who are parties to the review. Limited disclosure of business proprietary information (BPI) under an administrative protective order (APO) and BPI service list.—Pursuant to section 207.7(a) of the Commission’s rules, the Secretary will make BPI gathered in this review available to authorized applicants under the APO issued in the review, provided that the application is made by 45 days after publication of this notice. Authorized applicants must represent interested parties, as defined by 19 U.S.C. § 1677(9), who are parties to the review. A party granted access to BPI following publication of the Commission’s notice of institution of the review need not reapply for such access. A separate service list will be maintained by the Secretary for those parties authorized to receive BPI under the APO. Staff report.—The prehearing staff report in the review will be placed in the nonpublic record on March 22, 2012, and a public version will be issued thereafter, pursuant to section 207.64 of the Commission’s rules. Hearing.—The Commission will hold a hearing in connection with the review beginning at 9:30 a.m. on April 11, 2012, at the U.S. International Trade Commission Building. Requests to appear at the hearing should be filed in writing with the Secretary to the Commission on or before April 3, 2012. A nonparty who has testimony that may aid the Commission’s deliberations may request permission to present a short statement at the hearing. All parties and nonparties desiring to appear at the hearing and make oral presentations should attend a prehearing conference to be held at 9:30 a.m. on April 5, 2012, at the U.S. International Trade Commission Building. Oral testimony and written materials to be submitted at the public hearing are governed by sections 201.6(b)(2), 201.13(f), 207.24, and 207.66 of the Commission’s rules. E:\FR\FM\09DEN1.SGM 09DEN1

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[Federal Register Volume 76, Number 237 (Friday, December 9, 2011)]
[Notices]
[Pages 77012-77013]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2011-31614]



[[Page 77012]]

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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[2253-665]


Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of the Interior, 
National Park Service, Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, Ajo, AZ and 
Arizona State Museum, Tucson, AZ

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice

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SUMMARY: Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument has completed an inventory 
of human remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with 
the appropriate Indian tribes, and has determined that there is a 
cultural affiliation between the human remains and associated funerary 
objects and present-day Indian tribes. Representatives of any Indian 
tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human 
remains and associated funerary objects may contact Organ Pipe Cactus 
National Monument. Repatriation of the human remains and associated 
funerary objects to the Indian tribes stated below may occur if no 
additional claimants come forward.

DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes it has a 
cultural affiliation with the human remains and associated funerary 
objects should contact Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument at the 
address below by January 9, 2012.

ADDRESSES: Lee Baiza, Superintendent, Organ Pipe Cactus National 
Monument, 10 Organ Pipe Drive, Ajo, AZ 85321, telephone (520) 387-6849 
ext. 7500.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and 
associated funerary objects in the control of Organ Pipe Cactus 
National Monument, Ajo, AZ and in the physical custody of the Arizona 
State Museum, Tucson, AZ. The human remains and associated funerary 
objects were removed from site AZ Y:16:002 (ASM) in Pima County, AZ.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The 
determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
Superintendent, Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument.

Consultation

    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Organ Pipe 
Cactus National Monument and Arizona State Museum professional staff in 
consultation with representatives of the Ak Chin Indian Community of 
the Maricopa (Ak Chin) Indian Reservation, Arizona; Gila River Indian 
Community of the Gila River Indian Reservation, Arizona; Hopi Tribe of 
Arizona; Quechan Tribe of the Fort Yuma Indian Reservation, California 
and Arizona; and Tohono O'odham Nation of Arizona. The Cocopah Tribe of 
Arizona; Colorado River Indian Tribes of the Colorado River Indian 
Reservation, Arizona and California; Fort Mojave Indian Tribe of 
Arizona, California, and Nevada; Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian 
Community of the Salt River Reservation, Arizona; and Zuni Tribe of the 
Zuni Reservation, New Mexico were also contacted for consultation 
purposes.

History and Description of the Remains

    Between 1951 and 1954, human remains representing, at minimum, one 
individual were removed from site AZ Y:16:002 (ASM) in Pima County, AZ. 
The remains were removed during archeological fieldwork under the 
direction of Paul H. Ezell in a cooperative project between Arizona 
State Museum and the National Park Service. Project collections were 
stored at the NPS Southwestern National Monuments Headquarters, also 
known as the Southwest Archaeological Center, in Globe, AZ, for 
analysis and report preparation. The professional report was never 
completed. It is unclear at what point the cremated remains came to be 
in collections storage at the Arizona State Museum. No known 
individuals were identified. The 38 associated funerary objects are 2 
faunal bone fragments and 36 fragments of charcoal.
    Based upon the archeological context, including the presence of 
Tanque Verde Red-on-Brown ceramics, the remains have been determined to 
be Native American dating to A.D. 1150-1450, commonly known to the 
archeological community as the Classic Hohokam period.
    A relationship of shared group identity can reasonably be traced 
between members of the Hohokam culture and the four southern O'odham 
tribes of Arizona. The O'odham people comprise four Federally 
recognized Indian tribes (the Ak Chin Indian Community of the Maricopa 
(Ak Chin) Indian Reservation, Arizona; Gila River Indian Community of 
the Gila River Indian Reservation, Arizona; Salt River Pima-Maricopa 
Indian Community of the Salt River Reservation, Arizona; and Tohono 
O'odham Nation of Arizona) and one Indian Group that is not Federally 
recognized, the Hia C-ed O'odham. A Hia C-ed O'odham association with 
lands lying directly to the west of the Ajo Mountains, including Organ 
Pipe Cactus National Monument, is documented throughout the historic 
period and into the 20th century.
    O'odham oral histories describe the end time of the Hohokam, when 
O'odham armies gathered and marched on the Great House communities 
(e.g., Casa Grande, Pueblo Grande) and cast out the Hohokam societies 
there. The armies then occupied the conquered lands, intermarrying with 
the remnants of the Hohokam and ultimately becoming the O'odham people. 
Other evidence of the O'odham-Hohokam connection includes similar 
settlement patterns, irrigation systems, residence styles, and a 
possible relationship between modern O'odham kickball games and formal 
Hohokam ball courts.
    A relationship of shared group identity can also reasonably be 
traced between members of the Hohokam culture and the Hopi Tribe of 
Arizona. Hopi history is based, in large part, on clan migration 
narratives. The Hopi consider all of Arizona to be within traditional 
Hopi lands, i.e., areas in and through which Hopi clans are believed to 
have migrated in the past. Hopi oral history and the anthropological 
record show that some clans originated in the Salt-Gila region and were 
descended from the Hohokam. After the fall of the Great House 
communities, Hohokam refugees were absorbed into the Hopi culture.
    A relationship of shared group identity can also reasonably be 
traced between members of the Hohokam culture and the Zuni Tribe of the 
Zuni Reservation, New Mexico. Zuni oral history tells of ancestral 
migrations and settling throughout this region in their search for the 
Middle Place of the World (present day Pueblo of Zuni). Elders have 
identified features in the area, including shrines and petroglyphs, as 
Zuni. Zuni ancestors left many markers of their passing including 
trails, habitation sites, campsites, burials, sacred shrines, and rock 
art.

Determinations Made by Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument

    Officials of Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument have determined 
that:
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described 
in this notice represent the physical remains of one individual of 
Native American ancestry.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 38 objects described 
above are reasonably believed to have been placed

[[Page 77013]]

with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as 
part of the death rite or ceremony.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of 
shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native 
American human remains and associated funerary objects and the Ak Chin 
Indian Community of the Maricopa (Ak Chin) Indian Reservation, Arizona; 
Gila River Indian Community of the Gila River Indian Reservation, 
Arizona; Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian 
Community of the Salt River Reservation, Arizona; Tohono O'odham Nation 
of Arizona; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico.

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes itself to be 
culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary 
objects should contact Lee Baiza, Superintendent, Organ Pipe Cactus 
National Monument, 10 Organ Pipe Drive, Ajo, AZ 85321, telephone (520) 
387-6849 ext. 7500 before January 9, 2012. Repatriation of the human 
remains and associated funerary objects to the Ak Chin Indian Community 
of the Maricopa (Ak Chin) Indian Reservation, Arizona; Gila River 
Indian Community of the Gila River Indian Reservation, Arizona; Hopi 
Tribe of Arizona; Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community of the Salt 
River Reservation, Arizona; Tohono O'odham Nation of Arizona; and Zuni 
Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico may proceed after that date 
if no additional claimants come forward.
    Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument is responsible for notifying 
the Ak Chin Indian Community of the Maricopa (Ak Chin) Indian 
Reservation, Arizona; Cocopah Tribe of Arizona; Colorado River Indian 
Tribes of the Colorado River Indian Reservation, Arizona and 
California; Fort Mojave Indian Tribe of Arizona, California, and 
Nevada; Gila River Indian Community of the Gila River Indian 
Reservation, Arizona; Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Quechan Tribe of the Fort 
Yuma Indian Reservation, California and Arizona; Salt River Pima-
Maricopa Indian Community of the Salt River Reservation, Arizona; 
Tohono O'odham Nation of Arizona; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni 
Reservation, New Mexico that this notice has been published.

    Dated: December 5, 2011.
Sherry Hutt,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2011-31614 Filed 12-8-11; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4310-50-P