Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: Kingman Museum, Inc., Battle Creek, MI, 75901-75902 [2011-31070]

Download as PDF jlentini on DSK4TPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 233 / Monday, December 5, 2011 / Notices application and proposed action and to request a public meeting. DATES: Comments and requests for a public meeting must be received by March 5, 2012. ADDRESSES: Comments and meeting requests should be sent to the Oregon/ Washington State Director, BLM, 333 SW. 1st Avenue, P.O. Box 2965, Portland, Oregon 97208–2965. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Michael L. Barnes, BLM Oregon/ Washington State Office, (503) 808– 6155, or Dianne Torpin, USFS Pacific Northwest Region, (503) 808–2422. Persons who use a telecommunications device for the deaf (TDD) may call the Federal Information Relay Service (FIRS) at 1-(800) 877–8339 to reach either the BLM or USFS contact during normal business hours. The FIRS is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, to leave a message or question with either of the above individuals. You will receive a reply during normal business hours. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The USFS has filed an application requesting that the Secretary of the Interior extend PLO No. 6947 (57 FR 43618 (1992)), which withdrew 150 acres of National Forest System land in the Fremont National Forest from location and entry under the United States mining laws, but not from leasing under the mineral leasing laws, for an additional 20-year term, subject to valid existing rights. PLO No. 6947 is incorporated herein by reference. The purpose of the proposed withdrawal extension is to continue the protection of the USFS recreational rock hounding area at the Thunder Egg Lake Agate Beds. The use of a right-of-way, interagency agreement, or cooperative agreement would not provide adequate protection. The USFS would not need to acquire water rights to fulfill the purpose of the requested withdrawal extension. Records related to the application may be examined by contacting Michael L. Barnes at the above address or phone number. All persons who wish to submit comments, suggestions, or objections in connection with the proposed withdrawal extension may present their views in writing to the BLM State Director at the address indicated above until March 5, 2012. Comments, including names and street addresses of respondents, will be available for public review at the address indicated above during regular business hours. Individual respondents may request confidentiality. Before including your address, phone number, email address, VerDate Mar<15>2010 16:52 Dec 02, 2011 Jkt 226001 or other personal identifying information in your comment, be advised that your entire comment— including your personal identifying information—may be made publicly available at any time. While you can ask us in your comment to withhold from public review your personal identifying information, we cannot guarantee that we will be able to do so. Notice is hereby given that an opportunity for a public meeting is afforded in connection with the proposed withdrawal extension application. All interested parties who desire a public meeting for the purpose of being heard on the proposed withdrawal extension application must submit a written request to the BLM State Director at the address indicated above by March 5, 2012. Upon determination by the authorized officer that a public meeting will be held, a notice of the time and place will be published in the Federal Register and a local newspaper at least 30 days before the scheduled date of the meeting. The application will be processed in accordance with the regulations set forth in 43 CFR 2310.4. Authority: 43 CFR 2310.3–1. Fred O’Ferrall, Chief, Branch of Land, Mineral, and Energy Resources. [FR Doc. 2011–31119 Filed 12–2–11; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4310–11–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [2253–665] Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: Kingman Museum, Inc., Battle Creek, MI National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The Kingman Museum, Inc., in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribe, has determined that a cultural item meets the definition of sacred object and repatriation to the Indian tribe stated below may occur if no additional claimants come forward. Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the cultural item may contact the Kingman Museum, Inc. DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes it has a cultural affiliation with the cultural item should contact the Kingman Museum, Inc. at the address below by January 4, 2012. SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00042 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 75901 Beth Yahne, Kingman Museum, Inc., Battle Creek, MI 49037, telephone (269) 965–5117. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is hereby given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate a cultural item in the possession of the Kingman Museum, Inc. that meets the definition of sacred object under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American cultural item. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. ADDRESSES: History and Description of the Cultural Item The snapping turtle rattle was purchased by Kingman Museum Inc. in January of 1975 from Iroqrafts Ltd. in Ontario, Canada. At the time of its purchase, the rattle was estimated to be 83 years old, putting the date of its creation in the late 19th century. It was made by the Gana hna ‘‘City’’ for the Deer Clan of the Onondaga Nation of New York. The head and neck of the turtle acts as the handle while the shell acts as the rattle. According to information given at the time of purchase, the rattle had been used once by the False Face Society. Through consultation with representatives on the Haudenosaunee Standing Committee on Burial Rules and Regulations (representing the Tonawanda Seneca Nation and the Onondaga Nation), and review of museum records, the rattle has been identified as Native American and cultural affiliation has been determined between the rattle and the Onondaga Nation of New York. The aforementioned consultation also determined that the rattle is a sacred object. Determinations Made by the Kingman Museum, Inc. Officials of the Kingman Museum, Inc. have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(C), the one cultural item described above is a specific ceremonial object needed by traditional Native American religious leaders for the practice of traditional Native American religions by their present-day adherents. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced E:\FR\FM\05DEN1.SGM 05DEN1 75902 Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 233 / Monday, December 5, 2011 / Notices between the sacred object and the Onondaga Nation of New York. Additional Requestors and Disposition Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the sacred object should contact Beth Yahne, Kingman Museum, Inc., Battle Creek, MI 49037, telephone (269) 965–5117, before January 4, 2012. Repatriation of the sacred object to the Onondaga Nation of New York may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The Kingman Museum, Inc. is responsible for notifying the Onondaga Nation of New York that this notice has been published. Dated: November 29, 2011. Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2011–31070 Filed 12–2–11; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [2253–665] Notice of Inventory Completion: Minnesota Indian Affairs Council, Bemidji, MN National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The Minnesota Indian Affairs Council has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes, and has determined that there is no cultural affiliation between the human remains and any present-day Indian tribe. Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains may contact the Minnesota Indian Affairs Council. Disposition of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Indian tribes stated below may occur if no additional requestors come forward. DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes it has a cultural affiliation with the human remains should contact the Minnesota Indian Affairs Council at the address below by January 4, 2012. ADDRESSES: James L. (Jim) Jones, Cultural Resource Director, Minnesota Indian Affairs Council, 3801 Bemidji Avenue NW., Suite 5, Bemidji, MN 56601, telephone (218) 755–3223. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. jlentini on DSK4TPTVN1PROD with NOTICES SUMMARY: VerDate Mar<15>2010 16:52 Dec 02, 2011 Jkt 226001 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects in the possession of the Minnesota Indian Affairs Council (MIAC). The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from the following counties in MN: Brown, Carver, Dakota, Fillmore, Freeborn, Goodhue, Grant, Hennepin, Kandiyohi, Murray, Nicollet, Nobles, Olmsted, Sibley, Traverse, and Wright. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3) and 43 CFR 10.11(d). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. Consultation A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the MIAC professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Flandreau Santee Sioux Tribe of South Dakota; Lower Sioux Indian Community in the State of Minnesota; Prairie Island Indian Community in the State of Minnesota; Santee Sioux Nation, Nebraska; Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate of the Lake Traverse Reservation, South Dakota; Spirit Lake Tribe, North Dakota; and the Upper Sioux Community, Minnesota (hereinafter referred to as ‘‘The Tribes’’). History and Description of the Remains Between 1994 and 1996, human remains representing, at minimum, 16 individuals were discovered at the Helget site, 21–BW–82, in Brown County, MN, as a result of inadvertent backhoe disturbance on private property by the landowner. The remains were subsequently recovered by the Minnesota Office of the State Archaeologist. In 1995 and 1997, the human remains were transferred to the MIAC and assigned case number H291. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. The burial context and cranial morphology identify these human remains as pre-contact American Indian. These human remains have no archeological classification and cannot be identified with any present-day Indian tribe. In 1958, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were recovered from an undesignated site in Carver County, MN, by Mr. Bleichner while rock collecting in a gravel pit. In 2002, Mr. Bleichner donated the remains to the Carver County Historical PO 00000 Frm 00043 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Society. The remains were then transferred to the Minnesota Office of the State Archaeologist and then to the MIAC (H407). No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. The condition of the human remains suggests they are from a pre-contact time period and femora morphology identifies them as American Indian. These human remains have no archeological classification and cannot be associated with any present-day Indian tribe. In 1955 and 1956, human remains representing, at minimum, 15 individuals were recovered from site, 21–DK–5, Bremer Mound in Dakota County, MN, during archeological excavations conducted by Elden Johnson and Louis Powell of the Science Museum of Minnesota. In 1994 and 2010, the human remains were transferred from the Science Museum of Minnesota to the MIAC and assigned case number H259. No known individuals were identified. The two associated funerary objects include a small triangular projectile point and a bone bead. Records at the Science Museum of Minnesota, including a M.A. thesis by Peter Jensen (‘‘The Bremer Village and Mound Site,’’ 1959) suggest the human remains and associated funerary objects are associated with the Late Woodland Tradition based on the similarity between the objects and artifactual material in the mound fill (ceramic sherds) with material found at the Late Woodland component of a nearby (1⁄4 mile) village site, 21–DK–6. These human remains are associated with the Late Woodland Tradition, an archeological classification which cannot be identified with any presentday Indian tribe. In 1990, human remains representing, at minimum, one individual were transferred from the Fillmore County Museum to the MIAC’s laboratory at Hamline University where they were assigned case number H175. Information with the transfer indicates the human remains were from a display in a doctor’s office in Fillmore County. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. The condition and cranial morphology of the human remains identify them as pre-contact American Indian. These human remains have no archeological classification and cannot be associated with any present-day Indian tribe. In the 1950s, human remains representing, at minimum, three individuals were recovered by unknown person(s) from an outlet of Albert Lea E:\FR\FM\05DEN1.SGM 05DEN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 76, Number 233 (Monday, December 5, 2011)]
[Notices]
[Pages 75901-75902]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2011-31070]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[2253-665]


Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: Kingman Museum, 
Inc., Battle Creek, MI

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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SUMMARY: The Kingman Museum, Inc., in consultation with the appropriate 
Indian tribe, has determined that a cultural item meets the definition 
of sacred object and repatriation to the Indian tribe stated below may 
occur if no additional claimants come forward. Representatives of any 
Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the 
cultural item may contact the Kingman Museum, Inc.

DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes it has a 
cultural affiliation with the cultural item should contact the Kingman 
Museum, Inc. at the address below by January 4, 2012.

ADDRESSES: Beth Yahne, Kingman Museum, Inc., Battle Creek, MI 49037, 
telephone (269) 965-5117.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is hereby given in accordance with 
the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate a cultural item in the 
possession of the Kingman Museum, Inc. that meets the definition of 
sacred object under 25 U.S.C. 3001.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The 
determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American cultural item. The National Park Service is not responsible 
for the determinations in this notice.

History and Description of the Cultural Item

    The snapping turtle rattle was purchased by Kingman Museum Inc. in 
January of 1975 from Iroqrafts Ltd. in Ontario, Canada. At the time of 
its purchase, the rattle was estimated to be 83 years old, putting the 
date of its creation in the late 19th century. It was made by the Gana 
hna ``City'' for the Deer Clan of the Onondaga Nation of New York. The 
head and neck of the turtle acts as the handle while the shell acts as 
the rattle. According to information given at the time of purchase, the 
rattle had been used once by the False Face Society.
    Through consultation with representatives on the Haudenosaunee 
Standing Committee on Burial Rules and Regulations (representing the 
Tonawanda Seneca Nation and the Onondaga Nation), and review of museum 
records, the rattle has been identified as Native American and cultural 
affiliation has been determined between the rattle and the Onondaga 
Nation of New York. The aforementioned consultation also determined 
that the rattle is a sacred object.

Determinations Made by the Kingman Museum, Inc.

    Officials of the Kingman Museum, Inc. have determined that:
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(C), the one cultural item 
described above is a specific ceremonial object needed by traditional 
Native American religious leaders for the practice of traditional 
Native American religions by their present-day adherents.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of 
shared group identity that can be reasonably traced

[[Page 75902]]

between the sacred object and the Onondaga Nation of New York.

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with the sacred object should contact Beth 
Yahne, Kingman Museum, Inc., Battle Creek, MI 49037, telephone (269) 
965-5117, before January 4, 2012. Repatriation of the sacred object to 
the Onondaga Nation of New York may proceed after that date if no 
additional claimants come forward.
    The Kingman Museum, Inc. is responsible for notifying the Onondaga 
Nation of New York that this notice has been published.

    Dated: November 29, 2011.
Sherry Hutt,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2011-31070 Filed 12-2-11; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-P