Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology, Ann Arbor, MI, 73670-73673 [2011-30626]

Download as PDF 73670 Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 229 / Tuesday, November 29, 2011 / Notices identified by a member of the public at site 45WW48, and were collected by the Walla Walla County Sherriff’s Department and transferred to the Corps. The Corps subsequently transferred these remains to WSU for identification. Distinctive morphological characteristics indicate that the remains are Native American. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Site 45WW48 is adjacent to a pre-contact village and burial site and is consistent with other pre-contact Snake River burial sites. mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Site 45WW49 In 1976, the Corps collected human remains representing, at minimum, one individual from site 45WW49, near Charbonneau Park on the south shore of the Snake River. Distinctive morphological characteristics indicate that the remains are Native American. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Site 45WW49 lies within the boundaries of Site 45WW17, a precontact occupation site. The burial was found on a low sandy bench, above a river terrace habitation component. This arrangement is consistent with the Plateau pattern of pre-contact and historic Native American villages, whereby a burial ground is located close to and above the village, on a bluff or hill slope. Both sites are now inundated. The relevant evidence supports a cultural affiliation between the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, Washington; Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon; Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Reservation, Oregon; Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Washington; and the Nez Perce Tribe, Idaho (hereinafter referred to as ‘‘The Tribes’’) and the above-documented sites and collections. Additionally, a cultural relationship is determined to exist between the sites and collections and the Wanapum Band, a non-Federally recognized Indian group (hereinafter referred to as ‘‘The Indian Group’’). Information provided by The Tribes and The Indian Group shows that they are descended from the Native people who occupied these sites, and that the individuals buried along the Snake and mid-Columbia rivers are their ancestors. The aforementioned tribes are all part of the more broadly defined Plateau cultural community having shared past and present traditional lifeways that bind them to common ancestors. VerDate Mar<15>2010 15:20 Nov 28, 2011 Jkt 226001 Determinations Made by the U.S. Department of Defense, Army Corps of Engineers, Walla Walla District Officials of the U.S. Department of Defense, Army Corps of Engineers, Walla Walla District, have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9)–(10) the human remains described above represent the physical remains of 77 individuals of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 211 objects described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects, The Tribes, and The Indian Group. Additional Requestors and Disposition Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary objects should contact LTC David Caldwell, U.S. Department of Defense, Army Corps of Engineers, Walla Walla District, 201 North Third Ave., Walla Walla, WA 99362, telephone (509) 527–7700, before December 29, 2011. Repatriation of the human remains and associated funerary objects to The Tribes and The Indian Group may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The U.S. Department of Defense, Army Corps of Engineers, Walla Walla District, is responsible for notifying The Tribes and The Indian Group, that this notice has been published. Dated: November 22, 2011. Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2011–30613 Filed 11–28–11; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [2253–665] Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology, Ann Arbor, MI National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The University of Michigan has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with the appropriate SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00089 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Indian tribes, and has determined that there is no cultural affiliation between the remains and any present-day Indian tribe. Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains may contact the University of Michigan Office of the Vice President for Research. Disposition of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Indian tribes stated below may occur if no additional requestors come forward. DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes it has a cultural affiliation with the human remains should contact the University of Michigan Office of the Vice President for Research at the address below by December 29, 2011. ADDRESSES: Dr. Ben Secunda, NAGPRA Project Manager, Office of the Vice President for Research, University of Michigan, 4080 Fleming Building, 503 Thompson Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109–1340, telephone (734) 647–9085. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects in the possession of the University of Michigan. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from three sites in Mackinac County, MI. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3) and 43 CFR 10.11(d). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. Consultation A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by University of Michigan officials and its Museum of Anthropology NAGPRA collections staff in consultation with representatives of the Bay Mills Indian Community, Michigan; Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians, Michigan; Hannahville Indian Community, Michigan; Keweenaw Bay Indian Community, Michigan; Lac Vieux Desert Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians, Michigan; Little River Band of Ottawa Indians, Michigan; Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, Michigan; Match-e-benash-she-wish Band of Potawatomi Indians of Michigan; Nottawaseppi E:\FR\FM\29NON1.SGM 29NON1 Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 229 / Tuesday, November 29, 2011 / Notices mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Huron Band of the Potawatomi, Michigan (formerly the Huron Potawatomi, Inc.); Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians, Michigan and Indiana; Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan; and the Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Michigan (hereinafter referred to as ‘‘The Tribes’’). Additional requests for consultation were sent to the Absentee-Shawnee Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma; Bad River Band of the Lake Superior Tribe of Chippewa Indians of the Bad River Reservation, Wisconsin; Bois Forte Band (Nett Lake) of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Chippewa-Cree Indians of the Rocky Boy’s Reservation, Montana; Citizen Potawatomi Nation, Oklahoma; Delaware Nation, Oklahoma; Delaware Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma; Eastern Shawnee Tribe of Oklahoma; Fond du Lac Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Forest County Potawatomi Community, Wisconsin; Grand Portage Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Kickapoo Traditional Tribe of Texas; Kickapoo Tribe of Indians of the Kickapoo Reservation in Kansas; Kickapoo Tribe of Oklahoma; Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of the Lac du Flambeau Reservation of Wisconsin; Leech Lake Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Miami Tribe of Oklahoma; Mille Lacs Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Ottawa Tribe of Oklahoma; Peoria Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma; Prairie Band of Potawatomi Nation, Kansas; Quechan Tribe of the Fort Yuma Indian Reservation, California and Arizona; Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians, Minnesota; Sokaogon Chippewa Community, Wisconsin; St. Croix Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians of North Dakota; White Earth Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; and the Wyandotte Nation, Oklahoma. History and Description of the Remains In 1932, Robert Braidwood of the University of Michigan discovered human remains eroding from the surface while conducting an archeological survey of mounds comprising the Juntunen and Arrowhead Drive Sites in Mackinac County, MI. Between the initial 1932 discovery and 1960, human remains representing, at minimum, 76 individuals were excavated from the Juntunen Site. In 1959, Mr. Charles VerDate Mar<15>2010 15:20 Nov 28, 2011 Jkt 226001 Juntunen, the landowner of the site, found the human remains while preparing a road using a bulldozer. Mr. Juntunen contacted the University of Michigan to salvage the remains, and Alan McPherron and James Griffin conducted multiple excavations. The Juntunen Site contains five ossuaries (one large and four small, both defined by secondary-burials), one infant burial, and additional human remains collected from the surface of a mound. The largest ossuary discovered at the site consisted of a lower burial pit (Feature 10) separated by a sterile layer of soil from an upper burial pit (Feature 11), both of which were lined with birch bark. At minimum, 33 individuals were found in this ossuary buried in bundles, with a high number of individuals exhibiting pathological expressions of tuberculosis in conjunction with chronic vitamin deficiencies. The four smaller ossuaries contained, at minimum, 32 individuals. Additionally, an infant burial was discovered in a pit that was covered by a collapsed log roof. Human remains were also recovered from the surface of the site representing, at minimum, 10 individuals. No known individuals were identified. There are 71 associated funerary objects including: 1 medicine bundle containing 2 stone points; 1 red ground stone or palette; 2 ground stones; 3 flint cores; 13 stone flakes; 3 bone chisels; 3 harpoon heads; 2 small bone awls; 2 large bone awls; 1 otter skull with soil; 1 lot consisting of a strike-a-light kit—iron pyrite, flint, and ‘‘skitaagin; ’’ 1 copper awl; 1 bone punch or splinter with polished tips; 1 lot of twined textile fragments from the medicine bag; 2 miniature ceramic vessels; 29 shell and fish beads; 1 lot of approximately 700 Marginella shells that formed a shell beaded band or belt; and 3 lots of soil from the largest ossuary. McPherron and Griffin noted a long history of occupation at the site. Archeological analysis suggests that the location was used as a large, seasonal fishing camp during the Late Woodland period. The burials were found to date between 1200–1400 A.D. based on ceramic typology and Carbon 14 analysis. The burial treatments found at the site and in the ossuaries are consistent with the time period. In 1963, human remains representing, at minimum, seven individuals (1 elderly male, 3 adult females, 2 adult males, and 1 infant/neonate) were excavated from Arrowhead Drive Site by Charles Eyman of the University of Michigan. No known individuals were identified. The 20 associated funerary objects include: 1 medicine bundle containing 7 chert fragments; 1 animal PO 00000 Frm 00090 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 73671 bone lot with beaver incisors, black bear maxilla, bird and mammal bones; 8 stone fragments including specular hematite; 1 lot of the remains of a skin bag; 1 lot of shell and soil; 1 antler tool with a beaver incisor found near Burial 7; and 1 lot of ceramic sherds from two partial vessels. This site is adjacent to the Juntunen Site; however, the mortuary treatment of the human remains buried at Arrowhead Drive show primary interment in the mound, whereas burials at the Juntunen site were interred in secondary bundles. Individuals at this site also show more cavities and tooth wear than those from the adjacent excavation. The burial feature at this site was found to date between 70 B.C.-170 A.D. based on Carbon 14 dating and diagnostic artifacts, falling within the Middle Woodland period and pre-dating the Juntunen Site by more than 1,000 years. Sometime prior to 1924, human remains representing, at minimum one individual were removed from an unknown site in Saint Ignace, MI. The University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology purchased the human remains from Reverend L. P. Rowland in November of 1924 as part of a larger collection known as the ‘‘Rowland Collection,’’ which spans approximately 1,000 archeological and ethnographic objects from various locations in North America. No information on provenience is present except a reference to Saint Ignace, MI on the catalog card. Individual number 1276 was determined to be a middle aged adult 30–50 years of age, possibly female with cranial modifications from cradle boarding. No known individuals were identified. No funerary objects are present. Determinations Made by the University of Michigan Officials of the University of Michigan have determined that: • Based on cranial morphology, dental traits, as well as the pottery and artifacts associated with the burials that all pre-date the contact period the human remains are determined to be Native American. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), a relationship of shared group identity cannot be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and any present-day Indian tribe. • According to final judgments of the Indian Claims Commission, the land from which the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects, were removed is the aboriginal land of the Bad River Band of the Lake Superior Tribe of Chippewa Indians of the Bad E:\FR\FM\29NON1.SGM 29NON1 mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES 73672 Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 229 / Tuesday, November 29, 2011 / Notices River Reservation, Wisconsin; Bay Mills Indian Community, Michigan; Bois Forte Band (Nett Lake) of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; ChippewaCree Indians of the Rocky Boy’s Reservation, Montana; Fond du Lac Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Grand Portage Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians, Michigan; Keweenaw Bay Indian Community, Michigan; Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of the Lac du Flambeau Reservation of Wisconsin; Lac Vieux Desert Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians, Michigan; Leech Lake Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Little River Band of Ottawa Indians, Michigan; Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, Michigan; Mille Lacs Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Ottawa Tribe of Oklahoma; Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians, Minnesota; Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan; Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Michigan; Sokaogon Chippewa Community, Wisconsin; St. Croix Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians of North Dakota; and the White Earth Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota. • Multiple lines of evidence, including treaties, Acts of Congress, and Executive Orders, indicate that the land from which the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects were removed is the aboriginal land of the Absentee-Shawnee Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma; Bad River Band of the Lake Superior Tribe of Chippewa Indians of the Bad River Reservation, Wisconsin; Bay Mills Indian Community, Michigan; Bois Forte Band (Nett Lake) of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Chippewa-Cree Indians of the Rocky Boy’s Reservation, Montana; Citizen Potawatomi Nation, Oklahoma; Delaware Nation, Oklahoma; Delaware Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma; Eastern Shawnee Tribe of Oklahoma; Fond du Lac Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Forest County Potawatomi Community, Wisconsin; Grand Portage Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians, Michigan; Hannahville Indian Community, Michigan; Keweenaw Bay Indian Community, Michigan; Kickapoo Traditional Tribe of Texas; Kickapoo VerDate Mar<15>2010 15:20 Nov 28, 2011 Jkt 226001 Tribe of Indians of the Kickapoo Reservation in Kansas; Kickapoo Tribe of Oklahoma; Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of the Lac du Flambeau Reservation of Wisconsin; Lac Vieux Desert Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians, Michigan; Leech Lake Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Little River Band of Ottawa Indians, Michigan; Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, Michigan; Match-e-benash-she-wish Band of Pottawatomi Indians of Michigan; Miami Tribe of Oklahoma; Mille Lacs Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Nottawaseppi Huron Band of the Potawatomi, Michigan (formerly the Huron Potawatomi, Inc.); Ottawa Tribe of Oklahoma; Peoria Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma; Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians, Michigan and Indiana; Prairie Band of Potawatomi Nation, Kansas; Quechan Tribe of the Fort Yuma Indian Reservation, California and Arizona; Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians, Minnesota; Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan; Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Michigan; Shawnee Tribe, Oklahoma; Sokaogon Chippewa Community, Wisconsin; St. Croix Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians of North Dakota; White Earth Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; and the Wyandotte Nation, Oklahoma. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of 84 individuals of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 91 objects described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. • Pursuant to 43 CFR 10.11(c)(1), the disposition of the human remains is to The Tribes. Additional Requestors and Disposition Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains or any other Indian tribe that believes it satisfies the criteria in 43 CFR 10.11(c)(1) should contact Dr. Ben Secunda, NAGPRA Project Manager, University of Michigan, Office of the Vice President for Research, 4080 Fleming Building, 503 Thompson St., Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109–1340, telephone (734) 647–9085, before PO 00000 Frm 00091 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 December 29, 2011. Disposition of the human remains to The Tribes may proceed after that date if no additional requestors come forward. The University of Michigan Office of the Vice President for Research is responsible for notifying the AbsenteeShawnee Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma; Bad River Band of the Lake Superior Tribe of Chippewa Indians of the Bad River Reservation, Wisconsin; Bay Mills Indian Community, Michigan; Bois Forte Band (Nett Lake) of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; ChippewaCree Indians of the Rocky Boy’s Reservation, Montana; Citizen Potawatomi Nation, Oklahoma; Delaware Nation, Oklahoma; Delaware Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma; Eastern Shawnee Tribe of Oklahoma; Fond du Lac Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Forest County Potawatomi Community, Wisconsin; Grand Portage Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians, Michigan; Hannahville Indian Community, Michigan; Keweenaw Bay Indian Community, Michigan; Kickapoo Traditional Tribe of Texas; Kickapoo Tribe of Indians of the Kickapoo Reservation in Kansas; Kickapoo Tribe of Oklahoma; Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of the Lac du Flambeau Reservation of Wisconsin; Lac Vieux Desert Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians, Michigan; Leech Lake Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Little River Band of Ottawa Indians, Michigan; Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, Michigan; Match-e-benash-she-wish Band of Pottawatomi Indians of Michigan; Miami Tribe of Oklahoma; Mille Lacs Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Nottawaseppi Huron Band of the Potawatomi, Michigan (formerly the Huron Potawatomi, Inc.); Ottawa Tribe of Oklahoma; Peoria Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma; Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians, Michigan and Indiana; Prairie Band of Potawatomi Nation, Kansas; Quechan Tribe of the Fort Yuma Indian Reservation, California and Arizona; Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians, Minnesota; Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan; Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Michigan; Shawnee Tribe, Oklahoma; Sokaogon Chippewa Community, Wisconsin; St. Croix Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians of North Dakota; E:\FR\FM\29NON1.SGM 29NON1 Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 229 / Tuesday, November 29, 2011 / Notices White Earth Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; and the Wyandotte Nation, Oklahoma that this notice has been published. Madison & Euclid Aves., Lee Ave. & E. 5th St., El Dorado, 11000899 COLORADO Read Dunes House, 1453 Tremont Rd., Chesterton, 11000915 Delta County Rush County Indiana Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Children’s Home, 10892 N. IN 140, Knightstown, 11000916 El Paso County [FR Doc. 2011–30626 Filed 11–28–11; 8:45 am] Fort Collins Municipal Railway No. 22, 2333 Steel Dr., Colorado Springs, 11000901 Grace and St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church, 631 N. Tejon St., Colorado Springs, 11000902 BILLING CODE 4312–50–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Gilpin County [NPS–WASO–NRNHL–1111–8856; 2200– 3200–665] Russell Gulch I.O.O.F. Hall No. 47—Wagner and Askew, 81 Russell Gulch Rd., Russell Gulch, 11000903 Wayne County Richmond Downtown Historic District, Roughly Main St. between 7th & 10th Sts. & N. 8th St. between Main & A Sts., Richmond, 11000918 MARYLAND Prince George’s County Piscataway Village Historic District, Bounded by Piscataway Cr., Piscataway Rd. & Livingston Rd., Clinton, 11000919 ‘Tween Waters Inn Historic District, (Lee County MPS), 15951 Captiva Dr., Captiva, 11000904 Miami-Dade County Collins Waterfront Architectural District, Bounded by 24th St., Atlantic Ocean, Indian Creek Dr., Pine Tree Dr. & Collins Canal, Miami Beach, 11000905 MASSACHUSETTS Dukes County Barn House, 451 South Rd., Chilmark, 11000920 PENNSYLVANIA ILLINOIS Allegheny County Champaign County Wee Haven, 1509 W. Park Ave., Champaign, 11000906 Bell Telephone Company of Pennsylvania Western Headquarters Building, 201 Stanwix St., Pittsburgh, 11000921 Cook County Blair County Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal Historic District, (Illinois Waterway Navigation System Facilities MPS), Illinois Waterway mi. 290.0–321.7, Chicago, 11000907 Keith, D.S., Junior High School, (Educational Resources of Pennsylvania MPS), 1318 19th Ave., Altoona, 11000922 INDIANA Grotto, The—Our Lady of Lourdes Shrine, 15 E. Garibaldi Ave., Nesquehoning, 11000923 Boone County Cragun, Strange Nathanial, House, 404 W. Main St., Lebanon, 11000908 Carbon County Chester County Hancock County Greenfield Residential Historic District, Roughly bounded by Hendricks, South, & Wood Sts., & Boyd Ave., Greenfield, 11000909 Sharpless Homestead, 1045 Birmingham Rd. (Birmingham Township), West Chester, 11000924 Montgomery County Green Hill Farms, 6 E. Lancaster Ave., Lower Merion, 11000925 Jackson County Philadelphia County Carr High School, (Indiana’s Public Common and High Schools MPS), 10059 W. Cty. Rd. 250 S., Medora, 11000910 Jackson County Courthouse, 111 S. Main St., Brownstown, 11000911 Park Towne Place, 2200 Park Towne Place, Philadelphia, 11000926 Marion County J. Paul Loether, Chief, National Register of Historic Places/ National Historic Landmarks Program. Pratt, Wallace E., House, Pratt Dr. at McKittrick Rd., Salt Flat, 11000927 Archeological Sites 12Ma648 and 12Ma649, Address Restricted, Indianapolis, 11000912 Irvington Terrace Historic District, (Historic Residential Suburbs in the United States, 1830–1960 MPS), Roughly bounded by E. Washington St., Pleasant Run Pkwy., N. Arlington Ave., and E. side of N. Irwin St., Indianapolis, 11000913 ALABAMA mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Shelby County Courthouse, 407 S. Harrison St., Shelby, 11000917 Lee County Nominations for the following properties being considered for listing or related actions in the National Register were received by the National Park Service before November 5, 2011. Pursuant to section 60.13 of 36 CFR part 60, written comments are being accepted concerning the significance of the nominated properties under the National Register criteria for evaluation. Comments may be forwarded by United States Postal Service, to the National Register of Historic Places, National Park Service, 1849 C St. NW., MS 2280, Washington, DC 20240; by all other carriers, National Register of Historic Places, National Park Service,1201 Eye St. NW., 8th floor, Washington DC 20005; or by fax, (202) 371–6447. Written or faxed comments should be submitted by December 14, 2011. Before including your address, phone number, email address, or other personal identifying information in your comment, you should be aware that your entire comment—including your personal identifying information—may be made publicly available at any time. While you can ask us in your comment to withhold your personal identifying information from public review, we cannot guarantee that we will be able to do so. Mobile County Caldwell School, 351 Broad St., Mobile, 11000898 ARKANSAS Union County Mahony Historic District, Roughly bounded by Champagnolle Rd., Alley between N. Jkt 226001 Shelby County FLORIDA National Register of Historic Places; Notification of Pending Nominations and Related Actions 15:20 Nov 28, 2011 Porter County Hotchkiss Homestead, 422 Riverside Dr., Hotchkiss, 11000900 Dated: November 22, 2011. Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. VerDate Mar<15>2010 73673 TEXAS Culberson County VERMONT Chittenden County Dumas Tenements, 114 W. Allen & 114 W. Canal Sts., Winooski, 11000928 WEST VIRGINIA Marshall County Hampshire County Argos Izaak Walton League Historic District, 7184 E. 16th Rd., Argos, 11000914 South Branch Bridge, WV 259 N. of jct. Cty. Rd. 16, Capon Lake, 11000929 PO 00000 Frm 00092 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 E:\FR\FM\29NON1.SGM 29NON1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 76, Number 229 (Tuesday, November 29, 2011)]
[Notices]
[Pages 73670-73673]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2011-30626]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[2253-665]


Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Michigan Museum of 
Anthropology, Ann Arbor, MI

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The University of Michigan has completed an inventory of human 
remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with the 
appropriate Indian tribes, and has determined that there is no cultural 
affiliation between the remains and any present-day Indian tribe. 
Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes itself to be 
culturally affiliated with the human remains may contact the University 
of Michigan Office of the Vice President for Research. Disposition of 
the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Indian tribes 
stated below may occur if no additional requestors come forward.

DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes it has a 
cultural affiliation with the human remains should contact the 
University of Michigan Office of the Vice President for Research at the 
address below by December 29, 2011.

ADDRESSES: Dr. Ben Secunda, NAGPRA Project Manager, Office of the Vice 
President for Research, University of Michigan, 4080 Fleming Building, 
503 Thompson Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1340, telephone (734) 647-
9085.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and 
associated funerary objects in the possession of the University of 
Michigan. The human remains and associated funerary objects were 
removed from three sites in Mackinac County, MI.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3) and 
43 CFR 10.11(d). The determinations in this notice are the sole 
responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has 
control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service 
is not responsible for the determinations in this notice.

Consultation

    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by University 
of Michigan officials and its Museum of Anthropology NAGPRA collections 
staff in consultation with representatives of the Bay Mills Indian 
Community, Michigan; Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa 
Indians, Michigan; Hannahville Indian Community, Michigan; Keweenaw Bay 
Indian Community, Michigan; Lac Vieux Desert Band of Lake Superior 
Chippewa Indians, Michigan; Little River Band of Ottawa Indians, 
Michigan; Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, Michigan; Match-
e-be-nash-she-wish Band of Potawatomi Indians of Michigan; Nottawaseppi

[[Page 73671]]

Huron Band of the Potawatomi, Michigan (formerly the Huron Potawatomi, 
Inc.); Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians, Michigan and Indiana; 
Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan; and the Sault Ste. Marie 
Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Michigan (hereinafter referred to as ``The 
Tribes'').
    Additional requests for consultation were sent to the Absentee-
Shawnee Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma; Bad River Band of the Lake 
Superior Tribe of Chippewa Indians of the Bad River Reservation, 
Wisconsin; Bois Forte Band (Nett Lake) of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, 
Minnesota; Chippewa-Cree Indians of the Rocky Boy's Reservation, 
Montana; Citizen Potawatomi Nation, Oklahoma; Delaware Nation, 
Oklahoma; Delaware Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma; Eastern Shawnee Tribe of 
Oklahoma; Fond du Lac Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; 
Forest County Potawatomi Community, Wisconsin; Grand Portage Band of 
the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Kickapoo Traditional Tribe of 
Texas; Kickapoo Tribe of Indians of the Kickapoo Reservation in Kansas; 
Kickapoo Tribe of Oklahoma; Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior 
Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior 
Chippewa Indians of the Lac du Flambeau Reservation of Wisconsin; Leech 
Lake Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Miami Tribe of 
Oklahoma; Mille Lacs Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; 
Ottawa Tribe of Oklahoma; Peoria Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma; Prairie 
Band of Potawatomi Nation, Kansas; Quechan Tribe of the Fort Yuma 
Indian Reservation, California and Arizona; Red Cliff Band of Lake 
Superior Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Red Lake Band of Chippewa 
Indians, Minnesota; Sokaogon Chippewa Community, Wisconsin; St. Croix 
Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians 
of North Dakota; White Earth Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, 
Minnesota; and the Wyandotte Nation, Oklahoma.

History and Description of the Remains

    In 1932, Robert Braidwood of the University of Michigan discovered 
human remains eroding from the surface while conducting an 
archeological survey of mounds comprising the Juntunen and Arrowhead 
Drive Sites in Mackinac County, MI. Between the initial 1932 discovery 
and 1960, human remains representing, at minimum, 76 individuals were 
excavated from the Juntunen Site. In 1959, Mr. Charles Juntunen, the 
landowner of the site, found the human remains while preparing a road 
using a bulldozer. Mr. Juntunen contacted the University of Michigan to 
salvage the remains, and Alan McPherron and James Griffin conducted 
multiple excavations. The Juntunen Site contains five ossuaries (one 
large and four small, both defined by secondary-burials), one infant 
burial, and additional human remains collected from the surface of a 
mound. The largest ossuary discovered at the site consisted of a lower 
burial pit (Feature 10) separated by a sterile layer of soil from an 
upper burial pit (Feature 11), both of which were lined with birch 
bark. At minimum, 33 individuals were found in this ossuary buried in 
bundles, with a high number of individuals exhibiting pathological 
expressions of tuberculosis in conjunction with chronic vitamin 
deficiencies. The four smaller ossuaries contained, at minimum, 32 
individuals. Additionally, an infant burial was discovered in a pit 
that was covered by a collapsed log roof. Human remains were also 
recovered from the surface of the site representing, at minimum, 10 
individuals. No known individuals were identified. There are 71 
associated funerary objects including: 1 medicine bundle containing 2 
stone points; 1 red ground stone or palette; 2 ground stones; 3 flint 
cores; 13 stone flakes; 3 bone chisels; 3 harpoon heads; 2 small bone 
awls; 2 large bone awls; 1 otter skull with soil; 1 lot consisting of a 
strike-a-light kit--iron pyrite, flint, and ``skitaagin; '' 1 copper 
awl; 1 bone punch or splinter with polished tips; 1 lot of twined 
textile fragments from the medicine bag; 2 miniature ceramic vessels; 
29 shell and fish beads; 1 lot of approximately 700 Marginella shells 
that formed a shell beaded band or belt; and 3 lots of soil from the 
largest ossuary.
    McPherron and Griffin noted a long history of occupation at the 
site. Archeological analysis suggests that the location was used as a 
large, seasonal fishing camp during the Late Woodland period. The 
burials were found to date between 1200-1400 A.D. based on ceramic 
typology and Carbon 14 analysis. The burial treatments found at the 
site and in the ossuaries are consistent with the time period.
    In 1963, human remains representing, at minimum, seven individuals 
(1 elderly male, 3 adult females, 2 adult males, and 1 infant/neonate) 
were excavated from Arrowhead Drive Site by Charles Eyman of the 
University of Michigan. No known individuals were identified. The 20 
associated funerary objects include: 1 medicine bundle containing 7 
chert fragments; 1 animal bone lot with beaver incisors, black bear 
maxilla, bird and mammal bones; 8 stone fragments including specular 
hematite; 1 lot of the remains of a skin bag; 1 lot of shell and soil; 
1 antler tool with a beaver incisor found near Burial 7; and 1 lot of 
ceramic sherds from two partial vessels.
    This site is adjacent to the Juntunen Site; however, the mortuary 
treatment of the human remains buried at Arrowhead Drive show primary 
interment in the mound, whereas burials at the Juntunen site were 
interred in secondary bundles. Individuals at this site also show more 
cavities and tooth wear than those from the adjacent excavation. The 
burial feature at this site was found to date between 70 B.C.-170 A.D. 
based on Carbon 14 dating and diagnostic artifacts, falling within the 
Middle Woodland period and pre-dating the Juntunen Site by more than 
1,000 years.
    Sometime prior to 1924, human remains representing, at minimum one 
individual were removed from an unknown site in Saint Ignace, MI. The 
University of Michigan Museum of Anthropology purchased the human 
remains from Reverend L. P. Rowland in November of 1924 as part of a 
larger collection known as the ``Rowland Collection,'' which spans 
approximately 1,000 archeological and ethnographic objects from various 
locations in North America. No information on provenience is present 
except a reference to Saint Ignace, MI on the catalog card. Individual 
number 1276 was determined to be a middle aged adult 30-50 years of 
age, possibly female with cranial modifications from cradle boarding. 
No known individuals were identified. No funerary objects are present.

Determinations Made by the University of Michigan

    Officials of the University of Michigan have determined that:
     Based on cranial morphology, dental traits, as well as the 
pottery and artifacts associated with the burials that all pre-date the 
contact period the human remains are determined to be Native American.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), a relationship of shared 
group identity cannot be reasonably traced between the Native American 
human remains and any present-day Indian tribe.
     According to final judgments of the Indian Claims 
Commission, the land from which the Native American human remains and 
associated funerary objects, were removed is the aboriginal land of the 
Bad River Band of the Lake Superior Tribe of Chippewa Indians of the 
Bad

[[Page 73672]]

River Reservation, Wisconsin; Bay Mills Indian Community, Michigan; 
Bois Forte Band (Nett Lake) of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; 
Chippewa-Cree Indians of the Rocky Boy's Reservation, Montana; Fond du 
Lac Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Grand Portage Band 
of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Grand Traverse Band of 
Ottawa and Chippewa Indians, Michigan; Keweenaw Bay Indian Community, 
Michigan; Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of 
Wisconsin; Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of 
the Lac du Flambeau Reservation of Wisconsin; Lac Vieux Desert Band of 
Lake Superior Chippewa Indians, Michigan; Leech Lake Band of the 
Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Little River Band of Ottawa 
Indians, Michigan; Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, 
Michigan; Mille Lacs Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; 
Ottawa Tribe of Oklahoma; Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewa 
Indians of Wisconsin; Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians, Minnesota; 
Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan; Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of 
Chippewa Indians of Michigan; Sokaogon Chippewa Community, Wisconsin; 
St. Croix Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Turtle Mountain Band of 
Chippewa Indians of North Dakota; and the White Earth Band of the 
Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota.
     Multiple lines of evidence, including treaties, Acts of 
Congress, and Executive Orders, indicate that the land from which the 
Native American human remains and associated funerary objects were 
removed is the aboriginal land of the Absentee-Shawnee Tribe of Indians 
of Oklahoma; Bad River Band of the Lake Superior Tribe of Chippewa 
Indians of the Bad River Reservation, Wisconsin; Bay Mills Indian 
Community, Michigan; Bois Forte Band (Nett Lake) of the Minnesota 
Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Chippewa-Cree Indians of the Rocky Boy's 
Reservation, Montana; Citizen Potawatomi Nation, Oklahoma; Delaware 
Nation, Oklahoma; Delaware Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma; Eastern Shawnee 
Tribe of Oklahoma; Fond du Lac Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, 
Minnesota; Forest County Potawatomi Community, Wisconsin; Grand Portage 
Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Grand Traverse Band of 
Ottawa and Chippewa Indians, Michigan; Hannahville Indian Community, 
Michigan; Keweenaw Bay Indian Community, Michigan; Kickapoo Traditional 
Tribe of Texas; Kickapoo Tribe of Indians of the Kickapoo Reservation 
in Kansas; Kickapoo Tribe of Oklahoma; Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake 
Superior Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake 
Superior Chippewa Indians of the Lac du Flambeau Reservation of 
Wisconsin; Lac Vieux Desert Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians, 
Michigan; Leech Lake Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; 
Little River Band of Ottawa Indians, Michigan; Little Traverse Bay 
Bands of Odawa Indians, Michigan; Match-e-be-nash-she-wish Band of 
Pottawatomi Indians of Michigan; Miami Tribe of Oklahoma; Mille Lacs 
Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Nottawaseppi Huron 
Band of the Potawatomi, Michigan (formerly the Huron Potawatomi, Inc.); 
Ottawa Tribe of Oklahoma; Peoria Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma; Pokagon 
Band of Potawatomi Indians, Michigan and Indiana; Prairie Band of 
Potawatomi Nation, Kansas; Quechan Tribe of the Fort Yuma Indian 
Reservation, California and Arizona; Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior 
Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians, 
Minnesota; Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan; Sault Ste. Marie 
Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Michigan; Shawnee Tribe, Oklahoma; 
Sokaogon Chippewa Community, Wisconsin; St. Croix Chippewa Indians of 
Wisconsin; Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians of North Dakota; 
White Earth Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; and the 
Wyandotte Nation, Oklahoma.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described 
in this notice represent the physical remains of 84 individuals of 
Native American ancestry.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 91 objects described 
above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near 
individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the 
death rite or ceremony.
     Pursuant to 43 CFR 10.11(c)(1), the disposition of the 
human remains is to The Tribes.

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes itself to be 
culturally affiliated with the human remains or any other Indian tribe 
that believes it satisfies the criteria in 43 CFR 10.11(c)(1) should 
contact Dr. Ben Secunda, NAGPRA Project Manager, University of 
Michigan, Office of the Vice President for Research, 4080 Fleming 
Building, 503 Thompson St., Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1340, telephone 
(734) 647-9085, before December 29, 2011. Disposition of the human 
remains to The Tribes may proceed after that date if no additional 
requestors come forward.
    The University of Michigan Office of the Vice President for 
Research is responsible for notifying the Absentee-Shawnee Tribe of 
Indians of Oklahoma; Bad River Band of the Lake Superior Tribe of 
Chippewa Indians of the Bad River Reservation, Wisconsin; Bay Mills 
Indian Community, Michigan; Bois Forte Band (Nett Lake) of the 
Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Chippewa-Cree Indians of the Rocky 
Boy's Reservation, Montana; Citizen Potawatomi Nation, Oklahoma; 
Delaware Nation, Oklahoma; Delaware Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma; Eastern 
Shawnee Tribe of Oklahoma; Fond du Lac Band of the Minnesota Chippewa 
Tribe, Minnesota; Forest County Potawatomi Community, Wisconsin; Grand 
Portage Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Grand Traverse 
Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians, Michigan; Hannahville Indian 
Community, Michigan; Keweenaw Bay Indian Community, Michigan; Kickapoo 
Traditional Tribe of Texas; Kickapoo Tribe of Indians of the Kickapoo 
Reservation in Kansas; Kickapoo Tribe of Oklahoma; Lac Courte Oreilles 
Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Lac du Flambeau 
Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians of the Lac du Flambeau 
Reservation of Wisconsin; Lac Vieux Desert Band of Lake Superior 
Chippewa Indians, Michigan; Leech Lake Band of the Minnesota Chippewa 
Tribe, Minnesota; Little River Band of Ottawa Indians, Michigan; Little 
Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, Michigan; Match-e-be-nash-she-wish 
Band of Pottawatomi Indians of Michigan; Miami Tribe of Oklahoma; Mille 
Lacs Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; Nottawaseppi 
Huron Band of the Potawatomi, Michigan (formerly the Huron Potawatomi, 
Inc.); Ottawa Tribe of Oklahoma; Peoria Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma; 
Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians, Michigan and Indiana; Prairie Band 
of Potawatomi Nation, Kansas; Quechan Tribe of the Fort Yuma Indian 
Reservation, California and Arizona; Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior 
Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians, 
Minnesota; Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan; Sault Ste. Marie 
Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Michigan; Shawnee Tribe, Oklahoma; 
Sokaogon Chippewa Community, Wisconsin; St. Croix Chippewa Indians of 
Wisconsin; Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians of North Dakota;

[[Page 73673]]

White Earth Band of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Minnesota; and the 
Wyandotte Nation, Oklahoma that this notice has been published.

    Dated: November 22, 2011.
Sherry Hutt,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2011-30626 Filed 11-28-11; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-P