Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Washington State University, Museum of Anthropology, Pullman, WA, 73663-73664 [2011-30624]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 229 / Tuesday, November 29, 2011 / Notices objects were transferred to UI and subsequently to WSU. The 16 unassociated funerary objects are: 1 spoon, 1 hook and eye set, 12 lots of glass beads, 1 lot of fabric fragments, and 1 lot of nails. The funerary objects from 45WW63 appear to date to 1860– 1880, based on the burial type (an extended cedar box lined with matting and accompanied by numerous historicperiod funerary objects) and based on the type of funerary objects present. mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Determinations Made by the U.S. Department Of Defense, Army Corps of Engineers, Walla Walla District Officials of the U.S. Department of Defense, Army Corps of Engineers, Walla Walla District, have determined that: • Five lines of evidence— geographical, ethnographic, archeological, anthropological, and historical—support a cultural affiliation between the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, Washington; Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon; Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Reservation, Oregon; Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Washington; and the Nez Perce Tribe, Idaho (hereinafter referred to as ‘‘The Tribes’’) and the associated funerary objects identified above. Additionally, a cultural relationship is determined to exist between the sites and collections, and the Wanapum Band, a nonFederally recognized Indian group (hereinafter referred to as ‘‘The Indian Group’’). • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(B), the 1344 cultural items described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony and are believed, by a preponderance of the evidence, to have been removed from a specific burial site of a Native American individual. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the unassociated funerary objects, The Tribes and The Indian Group. Information provided by The Tribes and The Indian Group shows that they are descended from the Native people who occupied these sites, and that the individuals buried along the Snake and mid-Columbia Rivers are their ancestors. The aforementioned tribes are all part of the more broadly defined Plateau cultural community having shared past and present traditional lifeways that bind them to common ancestors. VerDate Mar<15>2010 15:20 Nov 28, 2011 Jkt 226001 Additional Requestors and Disposition Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the unassociated funerary objects should contact LTC David Caldwell, U.S. Department of Defense, Army Corps of Engineers, Walla Walla District, 201 North Third Ave., Walla Walla, WA 99362, telephone (509) 527– 7700, before December 29, 2011. Repatriation of the unassociated funerary objects to The Tribes and The Indian Group may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The U.S. Department of Defense, Army Corps of Engineers, Walla Walla District, is responsible for notifying The Tribes and The Indian Group that this notice has been published. Dated: November 22, 2011. Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2011–30629 Filed 11–28–11; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR [2253–665] National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Washington State University, Museum of Anthropology, Pullman, WA National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The Washington State University, Museum of Anthropology (WSU), in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes, has determined that the cultural items meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects and repatriation to the Indian tribes stated below may occur if no additional claimants come forward. Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the cultural items may contact WSU. SUMMARY: Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes it has a cultural affiliation with the cultural items should contact WSU at the address below by December 29, 2011. ADDRESSES: Mary Collins, Director, Washington State University, Museum of Anthropology, Pullman, WA 99164– 4910, telephone (509) 335–4314. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate cultural DATES: PO 00000 Frm 00082 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 73663 items in the possession of WSU that meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American cultural items. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. History and Description of the Cultural Items In the 1960s, WSU transferred its ethnographic collection from the Conner Museum to the Museum of Anthropology. In June of 2011, the curator of collections at the Conner Museum found four unassociated funerary items in the museum storage area and transferred them to the Museum of Anthropology. The items include two brass bracelets, one necklace of brass and shell beads, and one antler digging stick handle. Of the four objects, the digging stick handle was the only item with documentation; it has a label indicating it was accessioned into the Conner Museum in 1924. All of the items show clear evidence of having been buried for some period of time and all are object types common to historic and proto-historic period burials along the Lower Snake River region of Washington State. Beginning in the 1960s, Roderick Sprague, Professor Emeritus at the University of Idaho, began assembling a comparative collection of trade beads from archeological (mostly burial) sites along the Lower Snake River. In 2003, Dr. Sprague turned the collection over to the Museum of Anthropology. Most of the specimens in the collection were identified as to their site of origin; however, there are 66 lots of glass and metal bead specimens which have lost their site provenience labels and are assumed to have come from burial sites along the Lower Snake River. In 2003, seven items were found at WSU, stored with the materials from 45AS9, and were determined to be from an unknown site. The seven items include: 1 button, 1 natural stone, 1 metal nut, 1 lot of glass beads, and 3 lots of shell beads. The exact site provenience of these items is not known, nor is it known when the items were acquired by WSU. Only one of the items, the natural stone, is labeled as having a burial association; however, the items resemble funerary objects commonly found in burials on the Lower Snake River. E:\FR\FM\29NON1.SGM 29NON1 73664 Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 229 / Tuesday, November 29, 2011 / Notices mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES In 1992, while performing an inventory and rehabilitation of the archeological collection from site 45FR40, a number of items labeled as coming from burial associations were identified. The records of the 1957 excavation at the site do not report any burial excavations and so it was determined that the site provenience of these items is unknown. The 16 cultural items include 1 button, 8 unidentified historic items, 1 lot of animal fur, 2 lots of plant remains, 1 lot of bone beads, 1 lot of stone beads, 1 lot of bag residue, and 1 lot of mammal remains. Although the exact site provenience is not known, it is believed that given the storage association with site 45FR40 and the history of excavations at other sites along the Lower Snake River during the 1950s through 1970s these items probably come from a burial site along the Lower Snake River. The Lower Snake River region of southeastern WA is known to have included parts of the traditional territories of a number of Native American groups whose descendents now comprise members of the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, Washington; Nez Perce Tribe, Idaho; Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Reservation, Oregon; Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon, Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Washington (hereinafter referred to as ‘‘The Tribes’’); and the Wanapum Band, a nonFederally recognized Indian group (hereinafter referred to as ‘‘The Indian Group’’). Determinations Made by Washington State University, Department of Anthropology Officials of WSU have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(B), the 93 items described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony and is believed, by a preponderance of the evidence, to have been removed from a specific burial site of a Native American individual. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the unassociated funerary objects, The Tribes, and The Indian Group. Additional Requestors and Disposition Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the cultural items should VerDate Mar<15>2010 15:20 Nov 28, 2011 Jkt 226001 contact Mary Collins, Director of the Museum of Anthropology at Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99163, (509) 335–4314, before December 29, 2011. Repatriation of the 93 unassociated funerary objects to The Tribes and The Indian Group may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The Washington State University, Museum of Anthropology is responsible for notifying The Tribes and The Indian Group that this notice has been published. Dated: November 22, 2011. Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2011–30624 Filed 11–28–11; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR [2253–665] National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Washington State University, Museum of Anthropology, Pullman, WA National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The Washington State University, Museum of Anthropology (WSU) has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes, and has determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and associated funerary objects and present-day Indian tribes. Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary objects may contact WSU. Repatriation of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Indian tribes stated below may occur if no additional claimants come forward. DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes it has a cultural affiliation with the human remains and associated funerary objects should contact WSU at the address below by December 29, 2011. ADDRESSES: Mary Collins, Director, Washington State University, Museum of Anthropology, Pullman, WA 99164– 4910, telephone (509) 335–4314. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects in the possession of the SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00083 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Washington State University, Museum of Anthropology. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from Franklin County, WA, and an unknown location along the Lower Snake River. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. Consultation A detailed assessment of the human remains and funerary objects was made by the WSU professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, Washington; Nez Perce Tribe, Idaho; Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Reservation, Oregon; Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon; Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Washington (hereinafter referred to as ‘‘The Tribes’’); and the Wanapum Band, a nonFederally recognized Indian group (hereinafter referred to as ‘‘The Indian Group’’). History and Description of the Remains At some date between 1950 and 1970, human remains representing, at minimum, three individuals were removed from an unknown site in Franklin or Benton County, WA. The human remains were found among other archeological materials from sites excavated during this time period along the Lower Snake River. The remains, however, do not match any of the descriptions of excavated remains from any of the known sites. It is believed that these remains were excavated from one of several known burial sites along the Lower Snake River as archeologists at WSU were working at such sites between 1950 and 1970. The labels associated with the remains include burial numbers but not site numbers. No known individuals were identified. The 18 associated funerary objects are 1 projectile point, 3 lots of bag residue, 2 lots of plant remains, 3 lots of wood fragments, 1 lot of metal fragments, 1 lot of leather fragments, 1 lot of glass fragments, 2 lots of flakes, 1 lot of ceramic fragments, 2 lots of fabric fragments, and 1 lot of paper bags. In 1958, human remains representing, at minimum, three individuals were removed from Site 45FR1 (also known E:\FR\FM\29NON1.SGM 29NON1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 76, Number 229 (Tuesday, November 29, 2011)]
[Notices]
[Pages 73663-73664]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2011-30624]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

[2253-665]

National Park Service


Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Washington State 
University, Museum of Anthropology, Pullman, WA

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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SUMMARY: The Washington State University, Museum of Anthropology (WSU), 
in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes, has determined that 
the cultural items meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects 
and repatriation to the Indian tribes stated below may occur if no 
additional claimants come forward. Representatives of any Indian tribe 
that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the cultural 
items may contact WSU.

DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes it has a 
cultural affiliation with the cultural items should contact WSU at the 
address below by December 29, 2011.

ADDRESSES: Mary Collins, Director, Washington State University, Museum 
of Anthropology, Pullman, WA 99164-4910, telephone (509) 335-4314.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate cultural items in the 
possession of WSU that meet the definition of unassociated funerary 
objects under 25 U.S.C. 3001.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The 
determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American cultural items. The National Park Service is not responsible 
for the determinations in this notice.

History and Description of the Cultural Items

    In the 1960s, WSU transferred its ethnographic collection from the 
Conner Museum to the Museum of Anthropology. In June of 2011, the 
curator of collections at the Conner Museum found four unassociated 
funerary items in the museum storage area and transferred them to the 
Museum of Anthropology. The items include two brass bracelets, one 
necklace of brass and shell beads, and one antler digging stick handle. 
Of the four objects, the digging stick handle was the only item with 
documentation; it has a label indicating it was accessioned into the 
Conner Museum in 1924. All of the items show clear evidence of having 
been buried for some period of time and all are object types common to 
historic and proto-historic period burials along the Lower Snake River 
region of Washington State.
    Beginning in the 1960s, Roderick Sprague, Professor Emeritus at the 
University of Idaho, began assembling a comparative collection of trade 
beads from archeological (mostly burial) sites along the Lower Snake 
River. In 2003, Dr. Sprague turned the collection over to the Museum of 
Anthropology. Most of the specimens in the collection were identified 
as to their site of origin; however, there are 66 lots of glass and 
metal bead specimens which have lost their site provenience labels and 
are assumed to have come from burial sites along the Lower Snake River.
    In 2003, seven items were found at WSU, stored with the materials 
from 45AS9, and were determined to be from an unknown site. The seven 
items include: 1 button, 1 natural stone, 1 metal nut, 1 lot of glass 
beads, and 3 lots of shell beads. The exact site provenience of these 
items is not known, nor is it known when the items were acquired by 
WSU. Only one of the items, the natural stone, is labeled as having a 
burial association; however, the items resemble funerary objects 
commonly found in burials on the Lower Snake River.

[[Page 73664]]

    In 1992, while performing an inventory and rehabilitation of the 
archeological collection from site 45FR40, a number of items labeled as 
coming from burial associations were identified. The records of the 
1957 excavation at the site do not report any burial excavations and so 
it was determined that the site provenience of these items is unknown. 
The 16 cultural items include 1 button, 8 unidentified historic items, 
1 lot of animal fur, 2 lots of plant remains, 1 lot of bone beads, 1 
lot of stone beads, 1 lot of bag residue, and 1 lot of mammal remains. 
Although the exact site provenience is not known, it is believed that 
given the storage association with site 45FR40 and the history of 
excavations at other sites along the Lower Snake River during the 1950s 
through 1970s these items probably come from a burial site along the 
Lower Snake River.
    The Lower Snake River region of southeastern WA is known to have 
included parts of the traditional territories of a number of Native 
American groups whose descendents now comprise members of the 
Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, Washington; Nez Perce 
Tribe, Idaho; Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Reservation, Oregon; 
Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon, 
Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Washington 
(hereinafter referred to as ``The Tribes''); and the Wanapum Band, a 
non-Federally recognized Indian group (hereinafter referred to as ``The 
Indian Group'').

Determinations Made by Washington State University, Department of 
Anthropology

    Officials of WSU have determined that:
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(B), the 93 items described 
above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near 
individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the 
death rite or ceremony and is believed, by a preponderance of the 
evidence, to have been removed from a specific burial site of a Native 
American individual.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of 
shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the 
unassociated funerary objects, The Tribes, and The Indian Group.

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with the cultural items should contact Mary 
Collins, Director of the Museum of Anthropology at Washington State 
University, Pullman, WA 99163, (509) 335-4314, before December 29, 
2011. Repatriation of the 93 unassociated funerary objects to The 
Tribes and The Indian Group may proceed after that date if no 
additional claimants come forward.
    The Washington State University, Museum of Anthropology is 
responsible for notifying The Tribes and The Indian Group that this 
notice has been published.

    Dated: November 22, 2011.
Sherry Hutt,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2011-30624 Filed 11-28-11; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-P