Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Tennessee Valley Authority and the University of Tennessee McClung Museum, Knoxville, TN, 73658-73660 [2011-30618]

Download as PDF 73658 Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 229 / Tuesday, November 29, 2011 / Notices (BLM) Rio Grande Natural Area Commission will meet as indicated below. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR The meeting will be held from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on December 14, 2011. ADDRESSES: Hampton Inn Alamosa, 710 Mariposa Street, Alamosa, CO 81101. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Denise Adamic, Public Affairs Specialist, BLM Front Range District Office, 3028 East Main, Canon City, CO 81212. Phone: (719) 269–8553. Email: dadamic@blm.gov. Persons who use a telecommunications device for the deaf (TDD) may call the Federal Information Relay Service (FIRS) at 1–(800) 877– 8339 to contact the above individual during normal business hours. The FIRS is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, to leave a message or question with the above individual. You will receive a reply during normal business hours. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Rio Grande Natural Area Commission was established in the Rio Grande Natural Area Act (16 U.S.C. 460rrr–2). The ninemember Commission advises the Secretary of the Interior, through the BLM, concerning the preparation and implementation of a management plan relating to non-Federal land in the Rio Grande Natural Area, as directed by law. Planned agenda topics include: Discussing resource concerns and goals that should be addressed in the management plan, who stakeholders are in the area, and how internal and external communications will be addressed. In addition, the BLM will give a presentation on Tribal Consultation. This meeting is open to the public. The public may offer oral comments at 2:30 p.m. or written statements may be submitted for the Commission’s consideration. Please send written comments to Denise Adamic at the address above by December 12, 2011. Depending on the number of persons wishing to comment and time available, the time for individual oral comments may be limited. Summary minutes for the Commission Meeting will be maintained in the San Luis Valley Field Office and will be available for public inspection and reproduction during regular business hours within 30 days following the meeting. Meeting minutes and agenda are also available at: http:// www.blm.gov/co/st/en/fo/slvfo.html. [LLNMA010000 L10200000.EE0000] mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES DATES: Dated: November 23, 2011. Steven Hall, Acting State Director. [FR Doc. 2011–30838 Filed 11–28–11; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4310–JB–P VerDate Mar<15>2010 15:20 Nov 28, 2011 Jkt 226001 Bureau of Land Management Reopening the Call for Nominations for the Albuquerque District Resource Advisory Council Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: The purpose of this notice is to reopen the nomination period for the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) Albuquerque District Resource Advisory Council (RAC) in Category 3. The Albuquerque RAC provides advice and recommendations to the BLM on land use planning and management of the public lands within the BLM’s Albuquerque District. DATES: All nominations must be received no later than December 29, 2011. ADDRESSES: Contact Edwin Singleton, Albuquerque District Office, BLM, 435 Montano NE., Albuquerque, New Mexico 87107, (505) 761–8700. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Gina Melchor, RAC Coordinator, Albuquerque District Office, BLM, 435 Montano Road NE., Albuquerque, New Mexico 87107, (505) 761–8935, email: rmelchor@blm.gov. Persons who use a telecommunications device for the deaf (TDD) may call the Federal Information Relay Service (FIRS) at 1-(800) 877– 8339 to contact the above individual during business hours. The FIRS is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, to leave a message or question with the above individual. You will receive a reply during normal business hours. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976 (FLPMA) (43 U.S.C. 1739) directs the Secretary of the Interior (Secretary) to involve the public in planning and issues related to management of lands administered by the BLM. Section 309 of FLPMA directs the Secretary to establish 10- to 15member citizen-based advisory councils that are consistent with the Federal Advisory Committee Act (FACA). The rules governing RACs are found at 43 CFR subpart 1784. As required by FACA, RAC membership must be balanced and representative of the various interests concerned with the management of the public lands. There is one vacancy open in category 3, representing State, county, or local elected office; representatives and employees of a State agency responsible for management of natural resources, SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00077 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 land, or water; representatives of Indian tribes within or adjacent to the area for which the Council is organized; representatives of academia who are employed in natural resources management or the natural sciences; or the public-at-large. Individuals may nominate themselves or others. Nominees must be residents of the State in which the RAC has jurisdiction. The BLM will evaluate nominees based on their education, training, experience, and knowledge of the geographical area of the RAC. Nominees should demonstrate a commitment to collaborative resource decision-making. The Obama Administration prohibits individuals who are currently federally registered lobbyists from being appointed or reappointed to FACA and non-FACA boards, committees, or councils. The following must accompany all nominations: —Letters of reference from represented interests or organizations; —A completed background information nomination form; and —Any other information that addresses the nominee’s qualifications. Certification Statement: I hereby certify that the BLM’s Albuquerque District RAC is necessary and in the public interest in connection with the Secretary’s responsibilities to manage the lands, resources, and facilities administered by the BLM. Authority: 43 CFR 1784.4–1 Jesse Juen, Acting State Director. [FR Doc. 2011–30744 Filed 11–28–11; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4310–FB–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR [2253–665] National Park Service Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Tennessee Valley Authority and the University of Tennessee McClung Museum, Knoxville, TN National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) and the University of Tennessee McClung Museum (McClung Museum), in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes, have determined that the cultural items in this notice meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects, and repatriation to the Indian tribes stated below may occur if no additional claimants come forward. SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\29NON1.SGM 29NON1 Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 229 / Tuesday, November 29, 2011 / Notices Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the cultural items may contact the TVA and McClung Museum. DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes it has a cultural affiliation with the cultural items should contact TVA at the address below by December 29, 2011. ADDRESSES: Dr. Thomas O. Maher, TVA, 400 West Summit Hill Drive, WT 11D, Knoxville, TN 37902–1401, telephone (865) 632–7458. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate cultural items in the custody of the McClung Museum and control of TVA, Knoxville, TN that meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American cultural items. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES History and Description of the Cultural Items From 1967 through the mid 1980’s, Native American graves were excavated by professional archeologists from the McClung Museum during TVA’s construction of the Tellico reservoir. Five of these sites had historic Overhill Cherokee occupations and graves: Chota, Tanasee, Tomotley, Toqua and Citico. Based on an agreement between TVA and the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians of North Carolina, historic Cherokee human remains recovered during the Tellico Reservoir project were transferred to the Tribe for reburial in 1986. The objects from these graves, however, continued to be curated by the McClung Museum. Since neither TVA nor the McClung Museum has possession or control of the human remains, the objects are unassociated funerary objects. Based on both historical documents and oral tradition, the sites of Chota, Tanasee, Tomotley, Toqua and Citico were known to have had Cherokee occupations. Each village is illustrated in a map Lt. Henry Timberlake drafted in 1762, based on his stay with the Cherokee in the lower Little Tennessee River valley. At the Chota site (40MR2) 54 graves from the historic Overhill Cherokee VerDate Mar<15>2010 15:20 Nov 28, 2011 Jkt 226001 occupation were excavated. The unassociated funerary objects from these graves include 485 metal artifacts comprised of buttons, bells, nails, rings, buckles, axes, knives and musket balls made from iron, brass, pewter, silver and lead; three glass mirrors or mirror fragments; six glass vessel fragments; one glass bottle; twelve mineral samples including vermillion, barite, and one unshaped piece of smelted lead; four steatite pipes; one catlinite pipe; two clay siltstone pipes; three projectile points; two chert flakes; cloth fragments; one wooden fire horn plug; one conch shell ear pin; a deer metapodial bone; approximately 18,444 glass beads of varying size and color; and 36 beads made from shell. The Tanasee site (40MR62) is immediately adjacent to the Chota site and initial excavations did not distinguish between them. Seventeen graves are attributed to the Overhill Cherokee occupation at the Tanasee site. The unassociated funerary objects from these graves include 21 projectile points; one chipped stone flake; ten metal objects including brass buttons, a brass arrow point, a brass rumbler bell, iron scissors, strike-a-light and knife blade and other iron and brass fragments; animal bone fragments; one bone comb; one pottery sherd; approximately 10,748 glass beads of various sizes and colors; and 10 beads made from conch shells. The Tomotley site (40MR5) was excavated as a result of the Tellico Reservoir project. Nineteen graves are attributed to the historic Overhill Cherokee occupation of the site. The funerary objects from these graves include 216 metal objects comprised of iron tacks, knives, a straight razor, needle shanks, and a bayonet; silver objects include a ring, ear rings, brooches and shirt sleeve links; brass wire; brass sheet fragments; one brass necklace; pewter shirt sleeve links; one copper tube; one lead shot and ball; 30 fragments of glass; one glass mirror fragment; botanical remains including burned wood and seven cloth fragments; two lots of vermillion; one piece of lead; one chipped stone gun flint; approximately 8,545 glass beads; one shell bead; and 39 copper beads. The Toqua site (40MR6) was excavated as a result of the Tellico Reservoir project. Nineteen graves are attributed to the historic Overhill Cherokee occupation of the site. Unassociated funerary objects include 52 pieces of metal comprised of four brass buttons, a bell, wire, bracelets, disks, ornaments, one gun part, one iron gun barrel, strike-a-light, scissors, one hoe, two pewter buttons, a copper PO 00000 Frm 00078 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 73659 kettle, a silver brooch, and three lead musket balls; two projectile points; three gun flints; five chipped stone objects; six shell pendants; three pieces of glass; three samples of red ochre; three mink skull fragments; one piece of cord possibly used with a tinkler; approximately 11,294 glass beads of various sizes and colors; and six shell beads. The Citico site (40MR7) was excavated as a result of the Tellico Reservoir project. There were twentyfive graves attributed to the historic Overhill Cherokee occupation of the site. The unassociated funerary objects from these graves include 145 objects made of metal including copper objects comprised of five bells, beads, cones used as tinklers, five rings, tubes and pendants; brass items comprised of ‘‘C’’ bracelets, 28 buttons, and a neck collar ornament; iron items comprised of two razors, ‘‘C’’ bracelets, cones used as tinklers, finger rings, a knife, an awl with a bone handle and an axe; three silver tube beads; animal bone; two bone or antler ear pins; leather fragments; five samples of vermillion and red ochre; one quartz crystal; fabric fragments; wood pieces; three shell gorgets; two shell ear pins; one shell bead; one steatite pipe; one ground whetstone; and approximately 3,949 glass beads of various sizes and colors. Determinations Made by the TVA and McClung Museum Officials of the TVA and McClung Museum have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(B), the approximately 54,000 cultural items of which approximately 53,000 are glass beads described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony and are believed, by a preponderance of the evidence, to have been removed from a specific burial site of a Native American individual. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the unassociated funerary objects above and the Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma; Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians of North Carolina; and the United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma (hereinafter referred to as ‘‘The Tribes’’). Additional Requestors and Disposition Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the unassociated funerary objects should contact Dr. Thomas O. Maher, TVA, 400 West Summit Hill Drive, WT 11D, Knoxville, TN 37902– E:\FR\FM\29NON1.SGM 29NON1 73660 Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 229 / Tuesday, November 29, 2011 / Notices 1401, telephone (865) 632–7458 before December 29, 2011. Repatriation of the unassociated funerary objects to The Tribes may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The TVA is responsible for notifying The Tribes that this notice has been published. Dated: November 22, 2011. Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2011–30618 Filed 11–28–11; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [2253–665] Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of Defense, Army Corps of Engineers, Walla Walla District, Walla Walla, WA and the Museum of Anthropology, Washington State University, Pullman, WA National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The United States Department of Defense, Army Corps of Engineers, Walla Walla District, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes, has determined that the cultural items meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects and repatriation to the Indian tribes stated below may occur if no additional claimants come forward. Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the cultural items may contact the U.S. Department of Defense, Army Corps of Engineers, Walla Walla District. DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes it has a cultural affiliation with the cultural items should contact U.S. Department of Defense, Army Corps of Engineers, Walla Walla District at the address below by December 29, 2011. ADDRESSES: LTC David Caldwell, U.S. Department of Defense, Army Corps of Engineers, Walla Walla District, 201 North Third Ave., Walla Walla, WA 99362, telephone (509) 527–7700. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate cultural items in the possession of the U.S. Department of Defense, Army Corps of Engineers, Walla Walla District (Corps), Walla Walla, WA, and in the physical custody of the Washington State University, Museum of Anthropology mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES SUMMARY: VerDate Mar<15>2010 15:20 Nov 28, 2011 Jkt 226001 (WSU), Pullman, WA that meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the cultural items. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. History and Description of the Cultural Items Sites 45BN15, 45BN55, 45BN161, Site 45BN45 (aka 45BN186), 45FR101, 45WW63 and 45BN3 are situated in the McNary Lock and Dam Project lands, managed by the Corps, who initiated land acquisition processes for the Project in 1947. Sites 45WW16 and 45WW30 are situated in the Ice Harbor Lock and Dam Project lands on the Snake River, managed by the Corps, who initiated land acquisition processes for the Project in 1955. Sites 45FR52 and 45WT56 are situated in the Lower Monumental Lock and Dam Project lands on the Snake River, managed by the Corps, who initiated land acquisition processes for the Project in 1960. Site 45GA18 is situated in the Little Goose Lock and Dam Project lands on the Snake River, managed by the Corps, who initiated land acquisition processes for the Project in 1963. Sites 45WT47, 45WT65, 45WT97, 45WT99, 45WT102, 45AS81, 45GA100 and 45GA47 are situated in the Lower Granite Lock and Dam Project lands on the Snake River, managed by the Corps, who initiated land acquisition processes for the Project in 1965. Site 45AS81 In 1971, the University of Idaho’s (UI) Nez Perce Grave Removal Project (NPGRP) excavated 91 burials from Site 45AS81, the Alpaweyma Burial Site in Asotin County, WA. Materials from the 1971 UI excavations were transported to the UI Laboratory of Anthropology in Moscow, ID. Funerary objects from 45AS81 were transferred to Washington State University (WSU) Museum of Anthropology in 1998; this collection includes unassociated funerary objects from Burials 1, 4–21, 23, 27, 31, 36, 39– 57, 59, 61, 64–65, 67, 69–74B, 76, 79– 81, 83–94, 96, 98–99, 101, 103, as well as from the backfill and the ground surface. Funerary objects from the site date from the Piqunin Phase (ca. 1300– 1700 AD) to the late nineteenth century. The 633 unassociated funerary objects are: 1 bone whistle, 1 bone necklace, 2 bone combs, 1 horse tooth pendant, 1 PO 00000 Frm 00079 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 bone gaming piece, 1 projectile point, 1 preform, 3 stone cores, 5 brass tubes, 1 cap box, 1 ceramic pipe, 1 ceramic doll, 1 powder horn cap, 1 locket, 1 crucifix, 1 lamp wick holder, 2 marbles, 1 book, 1 lamp wick, 2 bottles, 3 spoons, 1 copper pendant, 13 brass bracelets, 3 studded leather bracelets, 7 rings, 1 bell, 7 dimes, 7 shell pendants, 3 lots of animal remains, 36 lots of stone flakes, 17 lots of metal fragments, 1 lot of wooden beads, 312 lots of glass beads, 12 lots of metal beads, 1 lot of fish hooks, 1 lot of concho fragments, 18 lots of leather fragments, 1 lot of tin can fragments, 39 lots of buttons, 1 lot of hook and eye, 6 lots of buckle fragments, 14 lots of fabric remnants, 1 lot of matting, 3 lots of mirror fragments, 5 lots of small bells, 2 lots of gun fragments, 2 lots of ammunition, 33 lots of nails, 38 lots of wood fragments, 12 lots of shell beads, 2 lots of charcoal, 1 lot of petrified wood, 1 lot of red ochre. Site 45BN3 In 1948, the Smithsonian Institution’s River Basin Survey Project (SRBS) removed funerary objects from Site 45BN3, a pre-contact-protohistoric village site located on Berrian’s Island in the Columbia River in Benton County, WA. Portions of the collection were originally housed at the University of Washington (UW) Burke Museum, Seattle, WA, and were transferred to WSU in 1996, at the Corps’ request. WSU inventoried the collection in 2002 and identified 170 unassociated funerary objects: 2 adzes, 4 antler wedges, 1 awl, 2 bear teeth, 20 beaver incisors, 6 bifaces, 3 bird bone whistles, 1 bone pendant, 1 carved antler item, 1 carved bone item, 5 copper pendants, 6 digging stick handles, 5 elk tooth beads, 1 incised bird bone, 3 incised stones, 1 iron ferrule, 1 metal ax, 2 metal bracelets, 6 metal knives, 1 net weight, 3 pestles, 2 polished bone items, 8 projectile points, 2 shell pendants, 4 stone abraders, 1 stone figurine, 1 stone pipe, 3 stone scrapers, 7 lots of bag residue, 2 lots of bird remains, 1 lot of bone beads, 2 lots of fish remains, 1 lot of glass beads, 3 lots of mammal remains, 3 lots of matting fragments, 4 lots of metal beads, 6 lots of metal fragments, 4 lots of natural stone, 6 lots of ochre, 8 lots of seed beads, 19 lots of shell beads, 2 lots of shellfish remains, 1 lot of stone beads, 3 lots of stone flakes, 2 lots of wood fragments. Site 45BN15 In 1947, 1951, and 1952, funerary objects were removed from Site 45BN15, on Rabbit Island in the Columbia River, Benton County, WA. UW initially housed the portions of the collections E:\FR\FM\29NON1.SGM 29NON1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 76, Number 229 (Tuesday, November 29, 2011)]
[Notices]
[Pages 73658-73660]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2011-30618]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

[2253-665]

National Park Service


Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Tennessee Valley 
Authority and the University of Tennessee McClung Museum, Knoxville, TN

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) and the University of 
Tennessee McClung Museum (McClung Museum), in consultation with the 
appropriate Indian tribes, have determined that the cultural items in 
this notice meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects, and 
repatriation to the Indian tribes stated below may occur if no 
additional claimants come forward.

[[Page 73659]]

Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes itself to be 
culturally affiliated with the cultural items may contact the TVA and 
McClung Museum.

DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes it has a 
cultural affiliation with the cultural items should contact TVA at the 
address below by December 29, 2011.

ADDRESSES: Dr. Thomas O. Maher, TVA, 400 West Summit Hill Drive, WT 
11D, Knoxville, TN 37902-1401, telephone (865) 632-7458.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate cultural items in the custody 
of the McClung Museum and control of TVA, Knoxville, TN that meet the 
definition of unassociated funerary objects under 25 U.S.C. 3001.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The 
determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American cultural items. The National Park Service is not responsible 
for the determinations in this notice.

History and Description of the Cultural Items

    From 1967 through the mid 1980's, Native American graves were 
excavated by professional archeologists from the McClung Museum during 
TVA's construction of the Tellico reservoir. Five of these sites had 
historic Overhill Cherokee occupations and graves: Chota, Tanasee, 
Tomotley, Toqua and Citico. Based on an agreement between TVA and the 
Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians of North Carolina, historic Cherokee 
human remains recovered during the Tellico Reservoir project were 
transferred to the Tribe for reburial in 1986. The objects from these 
graves, however, continued to be curated by the McClung Museum. Since 
neither TVA nor the McClung Museum has possession or control of the 
human remains, the objects are unassociated funerary objects.
    Based on both historical documents and oral tradition, the sites of 
Chota, Tanasee, Tomotley, Toqua and Citico were known to have had 
Cherokee occupations. Each village is illustrated in a map Lt. Henry 
Timberlake drafted in 1762, based on his stay with the Cherokee in the 
lower Little Tennessee River valley.
    At the Chota site (40MR2) 54 graves from the historic Overhill 
Cherokee occupation were excavated. The unassociated funerary objects 
from these graves include 485 metal artifacts comprised of buttons, 
bells, nails, rings, buckles, axes, knives and musket balls made from 
iron, brass, pewter, silver and lead; three glass mirrors or mirror 
fragments; six glass vessel fragments; one glass bottle; twelve mineral 
samples including vermillion, barite, and one unshaped piece of smelted 
lead; four steatite pipes; one catlinite pipe; two clay siltstone 
pipes; three projectile points; two chert flakes; cloth fragments; one 
wooden fire horn plug; one conch shell ear pin; a deer metapodial bone; 
approximately 18,444 glass beads of varying size and color; and 36 
beads made from shell.
    The Tanasee site (40MR62) is immediately adjacent to the Chota site 
and initial excavations did not distinguish between them. Seventeen 
graves are attributed to the Overhill Cherokee occupation at the 
Tanasee site. The unassociated funerary objects from these graves 
include 21 projectile points; one chipped stone flake; ten metal 
objects including brass buttons, a brass arrow point, a brass rumbler 
bell, iron scissors, strike-a-light and knife blade and other iron and 
brass fragments; animal bone fragments; one bone comb; one pottery 
sherd; approximately 10,748 glass beads of various sizes and colors; 
and 10 beads made from conch shells.
    The Tomotley site (40MR5) was excavated as a result of the Tellico 
Reservoir project. Nineteen graves are attributed to the historic 
Overhill Cherokee occupation of the site. The funerary objects from 
these graves include 216 metal objects comprised of iron tacks, knives, 
a straight razor, needle shanks, and a bayonet; silver objects include 
a ring, ear rings, brooches and shirt sleeve links; brass wire; brass 
sheet fragments; one brass necklace; pewter shirt sleeve links; one 
copper tube; one lead shot and ball; 30 fragments of glass; one glass 
mirror fragment; botanical remains including burned wood and seven 
cloth fragments; two lots of vermillion; one piece of lead; one chipped 
stone gun flint; approximately 8,545 glass beads; one shell bead; and 
39 copper beads.
    The Toqua site (40MR6) was excavated as a result of the Tellico 
Reservoir project. Nineteen graves are attributed to the historic 
Overhill Cherokee occupation of the site. Unassociated funerary objects 
include 52 pieces of metal comprised of four brass buttons, a bell, 
wire, bracelets, disks, ornaments, one gun part, one iron gun barrel, 
strike-a-light, scissors, one hoe, two pewter buttons, a copper kettle, 
a silver brooch, and three lead musket balls; two projectile points; 
three gun flints; five chipped stone objects; six shell pendants; three 
pieces of glass; three samples of red ochre; three mink skull 
fragments; one piece of cord possibly used with a tinkler; 
approximately 11,294 glass beads of various sizes and colors; and six 
shell beads.
    The Citico site (40MR7) was excavated as a result of the Tellico 
Reservoir project. There were twenty-five graves attributed to the 
historic Overhill Cherokee occupation of the site. The unassociated 
funerary objects from these graves include 145 objects made of metal 
including copper objects comprised of five bells, beads, cones used as 
tinklers, five rings, tubes and pendants; brass items comprised of 
``C'' bracelets, 28 buttons, and a neck collar ornament; iron items 
comprised of two razors, ``C'' bracelets, cones used as tinklers, 
finger rings, a knife, an awl with a bone handle and an axe; three 
silver tube beads; animal bone; two bone or antler ear pins; leather 
fragments; five samples of vermillion and red ochre; one quartz 
crystal; fabric fragments; wood pieces; three shell gorgets; two shell 
ear pins; one shell bead; one steatite pipe; one ground whetstone; and 
approximately 3,949 glass beads of various sizes and colors.

Determinations Made by the TVA and McClung Museum

    Officials of the TVA and McClung Museum have determined that:
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(B), the approximately 54,000 
cultural items of which approximately 53,000 are glass beads described 
above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near 
individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the 
death rite or ceremony and are believed, by a preponderance of the 
evidence, to have been removed from a specific burial site of a Native 
American individual.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of 
shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the 
unassociated funerary objects above and the Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma; 
Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians of North Carolina; and the United 
Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma (hereinafter referred to 
as ``The Tribes'').

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with the unassociated funerary objects should 
contact Dr. Thomas O. Maher, TVA, 400 West Summit Hill Drive, WT 11D, 
Knoxville, TN 37902-

[[Page 73660]]

1401, telephone (865) 632-7458 before December 29, 2011. Repatriation 
of the unassociated funerary objects to The Tribes may proceed after 
that date if no additional claimants come forward.
    The TVA is responsible for notifying The Tribes that this notice 
has been published.

    Dated: November 22, 2011.
Sherry Hutt,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2011-30618 Filed 11-28-11; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-P