Request for Information: Public Access to Peer-Reviewed Scholarly Publications Resulting From Federally Funded Research, 68518-68520 [2011-28623]

Download as PDF 68518 Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 214 / Friday, November 4, 2011 / Notices mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES requirements and follow best practices for protecting confidentiality, personal privacy, proprietary interests, intellectual property rights, author attribution, and for ensuring that homeland and national security interests are not compromised. The Working Group is now seeking additional insight from ‘‘non-Federal stakeholders, including the public, universities, nonprofit and for-profit publishers, libraries, federally funded and non-federally funded research scientists, and other organizations and institutions with an interest in longterm stewardship and improved public access to the results of federally funded research,’’ as described in Section 103(b)(6) of ACRA. Specifically the Working Group seeks further public comment on the questions listed below: Preservation, Discoverability, and Access (1) What specific Federal policies would encourage public access to and the preservation of broadly valuable digital data resulting from federally funded scientific research, to grow the U.S. economy and improve the productivity of the American scientific enterprise? (2) What specific steps can be taken to protect the intellectual property interests of publishers, scientists, Federal agencies, and other stakeholders, with respect to any existing or proposed policies for encouraging public access to and preservation of digital data resulting from federally funded scientific research? (3) How could Federal agencies take into account inherent differences between scientific disciplines and different types of digital data when developing policies on the management of data? (4) How could agency policies consider differences in the relative costs and benefits of long-term stewardship and dissemination of different types of data resulting from federally funded research? (5) How can stakeholders (e.g., research communities, universities, research institutions, libraries, scientific publishers) best contribute to the implementation of data management plans? (6) How could funding mechanisms be improved to better address the real costs of preserving and making digital data accessible? (7) What approaches could agencies take to measure, verify, and improve compliance with Federal data stewardship and access policies for scientific research? How can the burden VerDate Mar<15>2010 17:06 Nov 03, 2011 Jkt 226001 of compliance and verification be minimized? (8) What additional steps could agencies take to stimulate innovative use of publicly accessible research data in new and existing markets and industries to create jobs and grow the economy? (9) What mechanisms could be developed to assure that those who produced the data are given appropriate attribution and credit when secondary results are reported? Standards for Interoperability, Re-Use and Re-Purposing (10) What digital data standards would enable interoperability, reuse, and repurposing of digital scientific data? For example, MIAME (minimum information about a microarray experiment; see Brazma et al., 2001, Nature Genetics 29, 371) is an example of a community-driven data standards effort. (11) What are other examples of standards development processes that were successful in producing effective standards and what characteristics of the process made these efforts successful? (12) How could Federal agencies promote effective coordination on digital data standards with other nations and international communities? (13) What policies, practices, and standards are needed to support linking between publications and associated data? Response to this RFI is voluntary. Responders are free to address any or all the above items, as well as provide additional information that they think is relevant to developing policies consistent with increased preservation and dissemination of broadly useful digital data resulting from federally funded research. Please note that the Government will not pay for response preparation or for the use of any information contained in the response. How To Submit a Response All comments must be submitted electronically to: digitaldata@ostp.gov. Responses to this RFI will be accepted through January 12, 2012. You will receive an electronic confirmation acknowledging receipt of your response, but will not receive individualized feedback on any suggestions. No basis for claims against the U.S. Government shall arise as a result of a response to this request for information or from the Government’s use of such information. PO 00000 Frm 00124 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Inquiries Specific questions about this RFI should be directed to the following email address: digitaldata@ostp.gov. Form should include: [Assigned ID #] [Assigned Entry date] Name/Email Affiliation/Organization City, State Comment 1 Comment 2 Comment 3 Comment 4, Comment 5 Comment 6 Comment 7 Comment 8 Comment 9 Comment 10 Comment 11 In addition, please identify any other items the Working Group might consider for Federal policies related to public access to peer-reviewed scholarly publications resulting from federally supported research. Please attach any documents that support your comments to the questions. Ted Wackler, Deputy Chief of Staff. [FR Doc. 2011–28621 Filed 11–3–11; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE P OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY Request for Information: Public Access to Peer-Reviewed Scholarly Publications Resulting From Federally Funded Research Notice of Request for Information (RFI). ACTION: In accordance with Section 103(b)(6) of the America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010 (ACRA; Pub. L. 111–358), this Request for Information (RFI) offers the opportunity for interested individuals and organizations to provide recommendations on approaches for ensuring long-term stewardship and broad public access to the peerreviewed scholarly publications that result from federally funded scientific research. The public input provided through this Notice will inform deliberations of the National Science and Technology Council’s Task Force on Public Access to Scholarly Publications. Release Date: November 3, 2011. Response Date: January 2, 2012. ADDRESSES: publicaccess@ostp.gov. SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\04NON1.SGM 04NON1 Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 214 / Friday, November 4, 2011 / Notices Issued By Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) on behalf of the National Science and Technology Council (NSTC). SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Purpose In accordance with Section 103(b)(6) of the America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010 (ACRA; Pub. L. 111–358), this Request for Information (RFI) offers the opportunity for interested individuals and organizations to provide recommendations on approaches for ensuring long-term stewardship and broad public access to the peerreviewed scholarly publications that result from federally funded scientific research. The public input provided through this Notice will inform deliberations of the National Science and Technology Council’s Task Force on Public Access to Scholarly Publications. Background The multi-agency Task Force on Public Access to Scholarly Publications (Task Force), established under the National Science and Technology Council (NSTC) Committee on Science (CoS), has been tasked with developing options for implementing the scholarly publications requirements of Section 103 of ACRA. OSTP will issue a report to Congress, in accordance with Section 103(e) of ACRA, describing priorities for the development of agency policies for ensuring broad public access to the results of federally funded unclassified research, the status of agency policies for public access to publications resulting from federally funded research, and a summary of public input collected from this RFI and other mechanisms. In 2009 and 2010, OSTP conducted a public consultation about policy options for expanding public access to federally funded peer-reviewed scholarly articles. The Task Force has reviewed the information submitted through OSTP’s public consultation (the full set of comments can be viewed on the OSTP Web site [http://www.whitehouse.gov/ blog/2010/03/08/public-access-policyupdate]), experience with the various policies currently in use at a variety of Federal agencies, and a report from the congressionally convened Scholarly Publishing Roundtable (http:// www.aau.edu/WorkArea/ showcontent.aspx?id=10044). The Task Force is now seeking additional insight from ‘‘non-Federal stakeholders, including the public, universities, VerDate Mar<15>2010 17:06 Nov 03, 2011 Jkt 226001 nonprofit and for-profit publishers, libraries, federally funded and nonfederally funded research scientists, and other organizations and institutions with a stake in long-term preservation and access to the results of federally funded research,’’ as described in Section 103(b)(6) of the ACRA. Specifically, OSTP seeks further public comment on the questions listed below, on behalf of the Task Force: (1) Are there steps that agencies could take to grow existing and new markets related to the access and analysis of peer-reviewed publications that result from federally funded scientific research? How can policies for archiving publications and making them publically accessible be used to grow the economy and improve the productivity of the scientific enterprise? What are the relative costs and benefits of such policies? What type of access to these publications is required to maximize U.S. economic growth and improve the productivity of the American scientific enterprise? (2) What specific steps can be taken to protect the intellectual property interests of publishers, scientists, Federal agencies, and other stakeholders involved with the publication and dissemination of peer-reviewed scholarly publications resulting from federally funded scientific research? Conversely, are there policies that should not be adopted with respect to public access to peer-reviewed scholarly publications so as not to undermine any intellectual property rights of publishers, scientists, Federal agencies, and other stakeholders? (3) What are the pros and cons of centralized and decentralized approaches to managing public access to peer-reviewed scholarly publications that result from federally funded research in terms of interoperability, search, development of analytic tools, and other scientific and commercial opportunities? Are there reasons why a Federal agency (or agencies) should maintain custody of all published content, and are there ways that the government can ensure long-term stewardship if content is distributed across multiple private sources? (4) Are there models or new ideas for public-private partnerships that take advantage of existing publisher archives and encourage innovation in accessibility and interoperability, while ensuring long-term stewardship of the results of federally funded research? (5) What steps can be taken by Federal agencies, publishers, and/or scholarly and professional societies to encourage interoperable search, discovery, and analysis capacity across disciplines and PO 00000 Frm 00125 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 68519 archives? What are the minimum core metadata for scholarly publications that must be made available to the public to allow such capabilities? How should Federal agencies make certain that such minimum core metadata associated with peer-reviewed publications resulting from federally funded scientific research are publicly available to ensure that these publications can be easily found and linked to Federal science funding? (6) How can Federal agencies that fund science maximize the benefit of public access policies to U.S. taxpayers, and their investment in the peerreviewed literature, while minimizing burden and costs for stakeholders, including awardee institutions, scientists, publishers, Federal agencies, and libraries? (7) Besides scholarly journal articles, should other types of peer-reviewed publications resulting from federally funded research, such as book chapters and conference proceedings, be covered by these public access policies? (8) What is the appropriate embargo period after publication before the public is granted free access to the full content of peer-reviewed scholarly publications resulting from federally funded research? Please describe the empirical basis for the recommended embargo period. Analyses that weigh public and private benefits and account for external market factors, such as competition, price changes, library budgets, and other factors, will be particularly useful. Are there evidencebased arguments that can be made that the delay period should be different for specific disciplines or types of publications? Please identify any other items the Task Force might consider for Federal policies related to public access to peerreviewed scholarly publications resulting from federally supported research. Response to this RFI is voluntary. Responders are free to address any or all the above items, as well as provide additional information that they think is relevant to developing policies consistent with increased public access to peer-reviewed scholarly publications resulting from federally funded research. Please note that the U.S. Government will not pay for response preparation or for the use of any information contained in the response. How To Submit a Response All comments must be submitted electronically to: publicaccess@ostp.gov. Responses to this RFI will be accepted through January 2, 2012. You will receive an electronic confirmation acknowledging receipt of your response, E:\FR\FM\04NON1.SGM 04NON1 68520 Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 214 / Friday, November 4, 2011 / Notices but will not receive individualized feedback on any suggestions. No basis for claims against the U.S. Government shall arise as a result of a response to this request for information or from the Government’s use of such information. Inquiries Specific questions about this RFI should be directed to the following email address: publicaccess@ostp.gov. Form should include: [Assigned ID #] [Assigned Entry date] Name/Email Affiliation/Organization City, State Comment 1 Comment 2 Comment 3 Comment 4 Comment 5 Comment 6 Comment 7 Comment 8 Please identify any other items the Task Force might consider for Federal policies related to public access to peerreviewed scholarly publications resulting from federally supported research. {Attachment is: Please attach any documents that support your comments to the questions.} Ted Wackler, Deputy Chief of Staff. [FR Doc. 2011–28623 Filed 11–3–11; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE P SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. IC–29853] Notice of Applications for Deregistration Under Section 8(f) of the Investment Company Act of 1940 mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES October 28, 2011. The following is a notice of applications for deregistration under section 8(f) of the Investment Company Act of 1940 for the month of October, 2011. A copy of each application may be obtained via the Commission’s Web site by searching for the file number, or an applicant using the Company name box, at http://www.sec.gov/search/ search.htm or by calling (202) 551– 8090. An order granting each application will be issued unless the SEC orders a hearing. Interested persons may request a hearing on any application by writing to the SEC’s Secretary at the address below and serving the relevant applicant with a copy of the request, personally or by VerDate Mar<15>2010 17:06 Nov 03, 2011 Jkt 226001 mail. Hearing requests should be received by the SEC by 5:30 p.m. on November 25, 2011, and should be accompanied by proof of service on the applicant, in the form of an affidavit or, for lawyers, a certificate of service. Hearing requests should state the nature of the writer’s interest, the reason for the request, and the issues contested. Persons who wish to be notified of a hearing may request notification by writing to the Secretary, U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, 100 F Street NE., Washington, DC 20549–1090. For Further Information Contact: Diane L. Titus at (202) 551–6810, SEC, Division of Investment Management, Office of Investment Company Regulation, 100 F Street NE., Washington, DC 20549–8010. Keystone America Capital Preservation and Income Fund [File No. 811–6237] Summary: Applicant seeks an order declaring that it has ceased to be an investment company. On or about December 30, 1994, applicant transferred its assets to Keystone Capital Preservation and Income Fund, based on net asset value. Records listing the expenses incurred in connection with the reorganization are no longer available. Filing Date: The application was filed on October 5, 2011. Applicant’s Address: 200 Berkeley St., Boston, MA 02116. Keystone Australia Funds Inc. [File No. 811–5832] Summary: Applicant seeks an order declaring that it has ceased to be an investment company. On or about December 30, 1994, applicant transferred its assets to Keystone World Bond Fund, then known as Keystone America World Bond Fund, based on net asset value. Records listing the expenses incurred in connection with the reorganization are no longer available. Filing Date: The application was filed on September 27, 2011. Applicant’s Address: 200 Berkeley St., Boston, MA 02116. Global Real Estate Investments Fund [File No. 811–22322] Summary: Applicant seeks an order declaring that it has ceased to be an investment company. On July 29, 2011, applicant transferred its assets to James Alpha Global Real Estate Investments Portfolios, a series of Saratoga Advantage Trust, based on net asset value. Expenses of $80,330 incurred in connection with the reorganization were paid by Ascent Investment Advisors, LLC, applicant’s investment adviser. PO 00000 Frm 00126 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Filing Date: The application was filed on September 27, 2011. Applicant’s Address: Ascent Investment Advisors, LLC, 5251 DTC Parkway #935, Greenwood Village, CO 80111. For the Commission, by the Division of Investment Management, pursuant to delegated authority. Kevin M. O’Neill, Deputy Secretary. [FR Doc. 2011–28585 Filed 11–3–11; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 8011–01–P SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34–65660; File Nos. SR– EDGA–2011–29; SR–EDGX–2011–28] Self-Regulatory Organizations; EDGA Exchange, Inc.; EDGX Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Designation of Longer Period for Commission Action on Proposed Rule Changes Relating to Amendments to EDGA and EDGX Rules Regarding the Registration and Obligations of Market Makers October 31, 2011. On August 30, 2011, EDGA Exchange, Inc. and EDGX Exchange, Inc. (‘‘EDGA’’ and ‘‘EDGX,’’ or ‘‘Exchanges’’) filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (‘‘Commission’’), pursuant to Section 19(b)(1) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (‘‘Act’’),1 and Rule 19b–4 thereunder,2 proposed rule changes relating to amendments to EDGA and EDGX rules regarding the registration and obligations of market makers. The proposed rule changes were published for comment in the Federal Register on September 16, 2011.3 Section 19(b)(2) of the Act 4 provides that, within forty-five days of the publication of notice of the filing of a proposed rule change, or within such longer period as the Commission may designate up to ninety days of such date if it finds such longer period to be appropriate and publishes its reasons for so finding, the Commission shall either approve or disapprove the proposed rule change or institute proceedings to determine whether the proposed rule change should be disapproved. The 45th day for these filings is October 31, 2011. 1 15 U.S.C. 78s(b)(1). CFR 240.19b–4. 3 See Securities Exchange Act Release No. 65315 (September 12, 2011), 76 FR 57772 (September 16, 2011) (SR–EDGX–2011–28); Securities Exchange Act Release No. 65316 (September 12, 2011), 76 FR 57787 (SR–EDGA–2011–29). 4 15 U.S.C. 78s(b)(2). 2 17 E:\FR\FM\04NON1.SGM 04NON1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 76, Number 214 (Friday, November 4, 2011)]
[Notices]
[Pages 68518-68520]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2011-28623]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY


Request for Information: Public Access to Peer-Reviewed Scholarly 
Publications Resulting From Federally Funded Research

ACTION: Notice of Request for Information (RFI).

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: In accordance with Section 103(b)(6) of the America COMPETES 
Reauthorization Act of 2010 (ACRA; Pub. L. 111-358), this Request for 
Information (RFI) offers the opportunity for interested individuals and 
organizations to provide recommendations on approaches for ensuring 
long-term stewardship and broad public access to the peer-reviewed 
scholarly publications that result from federally funded scientific 
research. The public input provided through this Notice will inform 
deliberations of the National Science and Technology Council's Task 
Force on Public Access to Scholarly Publications.
    Release Date: November 3, 2011.
    Response Date: January 2, 2012.

ADDRESSES: publicaccess@ostp.gov.

[[Page 68519]]

Issued By

    Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) on behalf of the 
National Science and Technology Council (NSTC).

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

Purpose

    In accordance with Section 103(b)(6) of the America COMPETES 
Reauthorization Act of 2010 (ACRA; Pub. L. 111-358), this Request for 
Information (RFI) offers the opportunity for interested individuals and 
organizations to provide recommendations on approaches for ensuring 
long-term stewardship and broad public access to the peer-reviewed 
scholarly publications that result from federally funded scientific 
research. The public input provided through this Notice will inform 
deliberations of the National Science and Technology Council's Task 
Force on Public Access to Scholarly Publications.

Background

    The multi-agency Task Force on Public Access to Scholarly 
Publications (Task Force), established under the National Science and 
Technology Council (NSTC) Committee on Science (CoS), has been tasked 
with developing options for implementing the scholarly publications 
requirements of Section 103 of ACRA. OSTP will issue a report to 
Congress, in accordance with Section 103(e) of ACRA, describing 
priorities for the development of agency policies for ensuring broad 
public access to the results of federally funded unclassified research, 
the status of agency policies for public access to publications 
resulting from federally funded research, and a summary of public input 
collected from this RFI and other mechanisms.
    In 2009 and 2010, OSTP conducted a public consultation about policy 
options for expanding public access to federally funded peer-reviewed 
scholarly articles. The Task Force has reviewed the information 
submitted through OSTP's public consultation (the full set of comments 
can be viewed on the OSTP Web site [http://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2010/03/08/public-access-policy-update]), experience with the various 
policies currently in use at a variety of Federal agencies, and a 
report from the congressionally convened Scholarly Publishing 
Roundtable (http://www.aau.edu/WorkArea/showcontent.aspx?id=10044). The 
Task Force is now seeking additional insight from ``non-Federal 
stakeholders, including the public, universities, nonprofit and for-
profit publishers, libraries, federally funded and non-federally funded 
research scientists, and other organizations and institutions with a 
stake in long-term preservation and access to the results of federally 
funded research,'' as described in Section 103(b)(6) of the ACRA. 
Specifically, OSTP seeks further public comment on the questions listed 
below, on behalf of the Task Force:
    (1) Are there steps that agencies could take to grow existing and 
new markets related to the access and analysis of peer-reviewed 
publications that result from federally funded scientific research? How 
can policies for archiving publications and making them publically 
accessible be used to grow the economy and improve the productivity of 
the scientific enterprise? What are the relative costs and benefits of 
such policies? What type of access to these publications is required to 
maximize U.S. economic growth and improve the productivity of the 
American scientific enterprise?
    (2) What specific steps can be taken to protect the intellectual 
property interests of publishers, scientists, Federal agencies, and 
other stakeholders involved with the publication and dissemination of 
peer-reviewed scholarly publications resulting from federally funded 
scientific research? Conversely, are there policies that should not be 
adopted with respect to public access to peer-reviewed scholarly 
publications so as not to undermine any intellectual property rights of 
publishers, scientists, Federal agencies, and other stakeholders?
    (3) What are the pros and cons of centralized and decentralized 
approaches to managing public access to peer-reviewed scholarly 
publications that result from federally funded research in terms of 
interoperability, search, development of analytic tools, and other 
scientific and commercial opportunities? Are there reasons why a 
Federal agency (or agencies) should maintain custody of all published 
content, and are there ways that the government can ensure long-term 
stewardship if content is distributed across multiple private sources?
    (4) Are there models or new ideas for public-private partnerships 
that take advantage of existing publisher archives and encourage 
innovation in accessibility and interoperability, while ensuring long-
term stewardship of the results of federally funded research?
    (5) What steps can be taken by Federal agencies, publishers, and/or 
scholarly and professional societies to encourage interoperable search, 
discovery, and analysis capacity across disciplines and archives? What 
are the minimum core metadata for scholarly publications that must be 
made available to the public to allow such capabilities? How should 
Federal agencies make certain that such minimum core metadata 
associated with peer-reviewed publications resulting from federally 
funded scientific research are publicly available to ensure that these 
publications can be easily found and linked to Federal science funding?
    (6) How can Federal agencies that fund science maximize the benefit 
of public access policies to U.S. taxpayers, and their investment in 
the peer-reviewed literature, while minimizing burden and costs for 
stakeholders, including awardee institutions, scientists, publishers, 
Federal agencies, and libraries?
    (7) Besides scholarly journal articles, should other types of peer-
reviewed publications resulting from federally funded research, such as 
book chapters and conference proceedings, be covered by these public 
access policies?
    (8) What is the appropriate embargo period after publication before 
the public is granted free access to the full content of peer-reviewed 
scholarly publications resulting from federally funded research? Please 
describe the empirical basis for the recommended embargo period. 
Analyses that weigh public and private benefits and account for 
external market factors, such as competition, price changes, library 
budgets, and other factors, will be particularly useful. Are there 
evidence-based arguments that can be made that the delay period should 
be different for specific disciplines or types of publications?
    Please identify any other items the Task Force might consider for 
Federal policies related to public access to peer-reviewed scholarly 
publications resulting from federally supported research.
    Response to this RFI is voluntary. Responders are free to address 
any or all the above items, as well as provide additional information 
that they think is relevant to developing policies consistent with 
increased public access to peer-reviewed scholarly publications 
resulting from federally funded research. Please note that the U.S. 
Government will not pay for response preparation or for the use of any 
information contained in the response.

How To Submit a Response

    All comments must be submitted electronically to: 
publicaccess@ostp.gov.
    Responses to this RFI will be accepted through January 2, 2012. You 
will receive an electronic confirmation acknowledging receipt of your 
response,

[[Page 68520]]

but will not receive individualized feedback on any suggestions. No 
basis for claims against the U.S. Government shall arise as a result of 
a response to this request for information or from the Government's use 
of such information.

Inquiries

    Specific questions about this RFI should be directed to the 
following email address: publicaccess@ostp.gov.
    Form should include:

[Assigned ID ]
[Assigned Entry date]
Name/Email
Affiliation/Organization
City, State
Comment 1
Comment 2
Comment 3
Comment 4
Comment 5
Comment 6
Comment 7
Comment 8

Please identify any other items the Task Force might consider for 
Federal policies related to public access to peer-reviewed scholarly 
publications resulting from federally supported research.

{Attachment is: Please attach any documents that support your comments 
to the questions.{time} 

Ted Wackler,
Deputy Chief of Staff.
[FR Doc. 2011-28623 Filed 11-3-11; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE P