Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Colorado Museum, Boulder, CO, 62833-62835 [2011-26153]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 196 / Tuesday, October 11, 2011 / Notices development of the parkway for the next 20 years. It presents and analyzes three alternatives: Alternative A (no action) provides a baseline for evaluating changes and impacts of the two action alternatives. Alternative B is the NPS preferred alternative. The concept for management under alternative B emphasizes the original parkway design and traditional driving experience, while enhancing outdoor recreational opportunities and regional natural resource connectivity, and providing modest improvements to visitor services. In essence, the preferred alternative seeks to reinvest in the parkway’s aging infrastructure, update inadequate visitor services and facilities, and protect a biologically diverse natural environment that is only surpassed by two other units in the national park system. Under Alternative C, the parkway would seek to significantly expand regional recreation opportunities, re-design campgrounds and other facilities to provide more modern visitor services, and focuses on partnerships to enhance regional natural resource connectivity. The three alternatives are described in detail in chapter 2 of the draft plan. The key impacts of implementing the three alternatives are detailed in chapter 4 and summarized in chapter 2. Authority: The authority for publishing this notice is contained in 40 CFR 1506.6. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Superintendent Phil Francis, Blue Ridge Parkway, 199 Hemphill Knob Road, Asheville, NC 28803 or telephone at (828) 271–4779. The responsible official for this Draft EIS is the Regional Director, NPS Southeast Region, 100 Alabama Street, SW., 1924 Building, Atlanta, Georgia 30303. Dated: October 3, 2011. Ben West, Acting Regional Director, Southeast Region. [FR Doc. 2011–26163 Filed 10–7–11; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES [2253–665] Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: Peabody Museum of Natural History, Yale University, New Haven, CT National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: The Peabody Museum of Natural History, Yale University, in SUMMARY: VerDate Mar<15>2010 20:47 Oct 07, 2011 Jkt 226001 consultation with the appropriate Indian tribe, has determined that the cultural item meets the definition of unassociated funerary object and repatriation to the Indian tribe stated below may occur if no additional claimants come forward. Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the cultural item may contact the Peabody Museum of Natural History, Yale University. DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes it has a cultural affiliation with the cultural item should contact the Peabody Museum of Natural History, Yale University at the address below by November 10, 2011. ADDRESSES: Professor Derek E.G. Briggs, Director, Peabody Museum of Natural History, P.O. Box 208118, New Haven, CT 06520–8118, telephone (203) 432– 3752. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate a cultural item in the possession of the Peabody Museum of Natural History, Yale University, New Haven, CT, that meets the definition of unassociated funerary object under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the cultural item. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. History and Description of the Cultural Item In 1886, Mrs. Kate Foot Coe collected one chilkat blanket on Kiloosnoo Island, AK. On November 19, 1902, Mrs. Foot Coe donated it to the Peabody Museum of Natural History. The museum’s catalog describes the blanket as being found in a ‘‘receptacle on the top of a totem pole containing the bones and ashes of a cremated body.’’ No human remains associated with this blanket are in the museum’s collection. The catalog description of the blanket indicates that it was collected from a funerary context and was in association with bones at the time that it was collected. Based on the collection location on Kiloosnoo Island in the Northwest Coast culture area, the recovery of the blanket from a grave pole, and the type of object (chilkat blanket), this item is believed to be culturally affiliated with the Central PO 00000 Frm 00079 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 62833 Council of the Tlingit & Haida Indian Tribes. Determinations Made by the Peabody Museum of Natural History, Yale University Officials of the Peabody Museum of Natural History, Yale University have determined that: • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(B), the single cultural item described above is reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony and is believed, by a preponderance of the evidence, to have been removed from a specific burial site of a Native American individual. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the unassociated funerary object and the Central Council of the Tlingit & Haida Indian Tribes. Additional Requestors and Disposition Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the unassociated funerary object should contact Professor Derek E.G. Briggs, Director, Peabody Museum of Natural History, P.O. Box 208118, New Haven, CT 06520–8118, telephone (203) 432–3752, before November 10, 2011. Repatriation of the unassociated funerary object to the Central Council of the Tlingit & Haida Indian Tribes may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The Peabody Museum of Natural History, Yale University is responsible for notifying the Central Council of the Tlingit & Haida Indian Tribes that this notice has been published. Dated: October 3, 2011. Sherry Hutt, Acting Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2011–26179 Filed 10–7–11; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [2253–665] Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Colorado Museum, Boulder, CO National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The University of Colorado Museum has completed an inventory of human remains and an associated funerary object in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes, and has SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\11OCN1.SGM 11OCN1 62834 Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 196 / Tuesday, October 11, 2011 / Notices determined that there is no cultural affiliation between the human remains and associated funerary object and any present-day Indian tribe. Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary object may contact the University of Colorado Museum. Disposition of the human remains and associated funerary object to the Indian tribes stated below may occur if no additional requestors come forward. DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes it has a cultural affiliation with the human remains and associated funerary object should contact the University of Colorado Museum at the address below by November 10, 2011. ADDRESSES: Steve Lekson, Curator of Anthropology, University of Colorado Museum, Campus Box 218, Boulder, CO 80309, telephone (303) 492–6671. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and an associated funerary object in the possession of the University of Colorado Museum, Boulder, CO. The human remains and associated funerary object were removed from Culberson, El Paso, and Hudspeth Counties, TX. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3) and 43 CFR 10.11(d). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary object. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Consultation A detailed assessment of the human remains and associated funerary object was made by the University of Colorado Museum professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Apache Tribe of Oklahoma; Fort Sill Apache Tribe of Oklahoma; Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Jicarilla Apache Nation, New Mexico; Mescalero Apache Tribe of the Mescalero Reservation, New Mexico; Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; Pueblo of Zia, New Mexico; San Carlos Apache of the San Carlos Reservation, Arizona; Tonto Apache Tribe of Arizona; White Mountain Apache Tribe of the Fort Apache Reservation, Arizona; Ysleta del Sur Pueblo of Texas; and Zuni Tribe of VerDate Mar<15>2010 20:47 Oct 07, 2011 Jkt 226001 the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico (hereinafter referred to as ‘‘The Tribes’’). History and Description of the Remains On an unknown date, human remains (a cremation) representing a minimum of one individual were removed from south of Van Horn, Culberson County, TX by Joe Ben Wheat, the University of Colorado Museum’s curator of anthropology from 1953 to 1988. In November 2009, the human remains (TIN 0290) were found in the museum collection. The human remains have been identified as Jornada Mogollon based on other material culture collected from the same location. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. On an unknown date, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were removed from either Culberson, El Paso, or Hudspeth County, TX by Dr. Wheat, or near Fort Bayard, Grant County, NM by Hugo G. Rodeck, the University of Colorado Museum’s director from 1939 to 1971. In November 2009, the human remains (a tooth) (TIN 0091) were found in the collection. The human remains have been identified as Mogollon- most likely Jornada Mogollon- based on the material culture collected from the same location. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. On an unknown date, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were removed from ‘‘Hueco Mountain area camps 1, 2, 3; Hot Wells Section; below Basketmaker caves,’’ in El Paso or Hudspeth Counties, TX by Dr. Wheat. In November 2009, the human remains (a tooth) (TIN 0162) were found in the collection. The human remains have been identified as Jornada Mogollon based on the provenience. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. On an unknown date, human remains representing a minimum of three individuals were removed from the Hueco Mountains, El Paso and Hudspeth Counties, TX by Dr. Wheat. In November 2009, the human remains (a tooth (TIN 0195) and two vertebrae (TIN 0257) and (TIN 0458)) were found in the collection. The human remains have been identified as Jornada Mogollon based on other material culture collected from the same location. No known individuals were identified. One funerary object, a projectile point, is associated with one of the vertebrae (TIN 0458). On an unknown date, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were removed from Hudspeth County, TX by Dr. Wheat. In PO 00000 Frm 00080 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 November 2009, the human remains (a tooth) (TIN 0186) were found in the collection. The human remains have been identified as Jornada Mogollon based on other material culture collected from the same location. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Determinations Made by the University of Colorado Museum Officials of the University of Colorado Museum have determined that: • Based on locational information and the material culture believed to have come from those same locations, the human remains are Native American. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), a relationship of shared group identity cannot be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary object and any present-day Indian tribe. • According to final judgments of the Indian Claims Commission, the land from which the Native American human remains and associated funerary object were removed is the aboriginal land of the Fort Sill Apache Tribe of Oklahoma; Mescalero Apache Tribe of the Mescalero Reservation, New Mexico; White Mountain Apache Tribe of the Fort Apache Reservation, Arizona; and Ysleta del Sur Pueblo of Texas. • Multiple lines of evidence, including treaties, Acts of Congress, and Executive Orders, indicate that the land from which the Native American human remains and associated funerary object were removed is the aboriginal land of the Apache Tribe of Oklahoma; Fort Sill Apache Tribe of Oklahoma; Jicarilla Apache Nation, New Mexico; Mescalero Apache Tribe of the Mescalero Reservation, New Mexico; San Carlos Apache of the San Carlos Reservation, Arizona; Tonto Apache Tribe of Arizona; and White Mountain Apache Tribe of the Fort Apache Reservation, Arizona. • Other credible lines of evidence indicate that the land from which the Native American human remains and associated funerary object were removed is the aboriginal land of the Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; Pueblo of Zia, New Mexico; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of seven individuals of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the one object described above is reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains E:\FR\FM\11OCN1.SGM 11OCN1 Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 196 / Tuesday, October 11, 2011 / Notices at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. • Pursuant to 43 CFR 10.11(c)(1), the disposition of the human remains and associated funerary object is to the Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico. Additional Requestors and Disposition Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary object, or any other Indian tribe that believes it satisfies the criteria in 43 CFR 10.11(c)(1) should contact Steve Lekson, Curator of Anthropology, University of Colorado Museum, Campus Box 218, Boulder, CO 80309, telephone (303) 492–6671, before November 10, 2011. Disposition of the human remains and associated funerary object to the Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico, may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The University of Colorado Museum is responsible for notifying The Tribes that this notice has been published. Dated: October 3, 2011. Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2011–26153 Filed 10–7–11; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [2253–665] Notice of Inventory Completion: Fort Lewis College, Durango, CO National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The Fort Lewis College has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes, and has determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and associated funerary objects and present-day Indian tribes. Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary objects may contact Fort Lewis College. Repatriation of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Indian tribes stated below may occur if no additional claimants come forward. mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES SUMMARY: Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes it has a cultural affiliation with the human remains and associated funerary objects should contact the Fort Lewis College at the address below by November 10, 2011. DATES: VerDate Mar<15>2010 20:47 Oct 07, 2011 Jkt 226001 Dawn Mulhern, Department of Anthropology, Fort Lewis College, 1000 Rim Dr., Durango, CO 81301, telephone (970) 247–7500. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects in the possession of Fort Lewis College, Durango, CO. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from Archuleta, La Plata, and Montezuma Counties, CO. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. ADDRESSES: Consultation A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Fort Lewis College professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Jicarilla Apache Nation, New Mexico; Navajo Nation, Arizona, New Mexico & Utah; Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; Pueblo of Jemez, New Mexico; Pueblo of Nambe, New Mexico; Pueblo of Pojoaque, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Clara, New Mexico; Pueblo of Taos, New Mexico; Pueblo of Tesuque, New Mexico; Pueblo of Zia, New Mexico; Southern Ute Indian Tribe of the Southern Ute Reservation, Utah; Ute Indian Tribe of the Uintah & Ouray Reservation, Colorado, New Mexico & Utah; Ute Mountain Tribe of the Ute Mountain Reservation, Colorado; and the Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico. History and Description of the Remains In the 1970s, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were removed from the Arboles area, Archuleta County, CO. Dr. Susan Riches, archeologist, reported that Dr. Katherine Hulbert, a physical anthropologist at Fort Lewis College in the 1970s, noted that the remains are ‘‘10th Century Arboles Area.’’ No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In the early 1980s, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were removed from private land at 6775 County Road 203, West Animas Valley, near Durango, La Plata County, CO. This burial was recovered PO 00000 Frm 00081 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 62835 as a result of construction in the area. No known individual was identified. The 11 associated funerary objects are 1 gray Chapin pitcher and 10 sherds of grayware pottery. In 1978, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were removed from a construction site on Forest Avenue, in Durango, La Plata County, CO. The human remains were uncovered by workers from a local contracting company and brought to the college in a box. The immediate location is destroyed. According to Dr. Riches, the remains seem to be an isolated burial and are associated with a grayware jar. No known individual was identified. The one associated funerary object is a partial ceramic jar. In 1958, human remains representing a minimum of three individuals were removed from the Crestview area of Durango, La Plata County, CO. The remains were found by Pat Murphy and were donated to Fort Lewis College by Murphy in October 1995. No known individuals were identified. The two associated funerary objects are a pottery bowl and pot. In 1989, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were removed from 5LP 4883, in La Plata County, CO. These remains were found along Rim Drive (County Road 239), near the Fort Lewis College Campus on City of Durango land. These remains were exposed as the result of road construction and subsequent erosion. The control of these remains were officially transferred to Fort Lewis College in 2011. No known individual was identified. The one associated funerary object is a reconstructed Chapin grayware pot. The associated funerary objects for the above four sites are consistent with the Basketmaker III/Pueblo I period (A.D. 650–840). In 1984, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were removed from 5LP 1421, in La Plata County, CO. The remains were found on Rim Road on the Fort Lewis College campus and the site was disturbed due to road construction. No known individual was identified. The eight associated funerary objects are pottery sherds (one grayware jar sherd and seven Rosa black-on-white bowl sherds). According to the site form, this site dates to the Basketmaker III/Pueblo I period (7th or 8th century A.D.) based on ceramic evidence. In 1997, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were removed from site 5LP 4847, in La Plata County, CO. The remains were excavated by archeologists from Fort Lewis College from a burial context E:\FR\FM\11OCN1.SGM 11OCN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 76, Number 196 (Tuesday, October 11, 2011)]
[Notices]
[Pages 62833-62835]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2011-26153]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[2253-665]


Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Colorado Museum, 
Boulder, CO

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The University of Colorado Museum has completed an inventory 
of human remains and an associated funerary object in consultation with 
the appropriate Indian tribes, and has

[[Page 62834]]

determined that there is no cultural affiliation between the human 
remains and associated funerary object and any present-day Indian 
tribe. Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes itself to be 
culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary 
object may contact the University of Colorado Museum. Disposition of 
the human remains and associated funerary object to the Indian tribes 
stated below may occur if no additional requestors come forward.

DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes it has a 
cultural affiliation with the human remains and associated funerary 
object should contact the University of Colorado Museum at the address 
below by November 10, 2011.

ADDRESSES: Steve Lekson, Curator of Anthropology, University of 
Colorado Museum, Campus Box 218, Boulder, CO 80309, telephone (303) 
492-6671.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and an 
associated funerary object in the possession of the University of 
Colorado Museum, Boulder, CO. The human remains and associated funerary 
object were removed from Culberson, El Paso, and Hudspeth Counties, TX.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3) and 
43 CFR 10.11(d). The determinations in this notice are the sole 
responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has 
control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary 
object. The National Park Service is not responsible for the 
determinations in this notice.

Consultation

    A detailed assessment of the human remains and associated funerary 
object was made by the University of Colorado Museum professional staff 
in consultation with representatives of the Apache Tribe of Oklahoma; 
Fort Sill Apache Tribe of Oklahoma; Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Jicarilla 
Apache Nation, New Mexico; Mescalero Apache Tribe of the Mescalero 
Reservation, New Mexico; Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; Pueblo of Zia, 
New Mexico; San Carlos Apache of the San Carlos Reservation, Arizona; 
Tonto Apache Tribe of Arizona; White Mountain Apache Tribe of the Fort 
Apache Reservation, Arizona; Ysleta del Sur Pueblo of Texas; and Zuni 
Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico (hereinafter referred to as 
``The Tribes'').

History and Description of the Remains

    On an unknown date, human remains (a cremation) representing a 
minimum of one individual were removed from south of Van Horn, 
Culberson County, TX by Joe Ben Wheat, the University of Colorado 
Museum's curator of anthropology from 1953 to 1988. In November 2009, 
the human remains (TIN 0290) were found in the museum collection. The 
human remains have been identified as Jornada Mogollon based on other 
material culture collected from the same location. No known individual 
was identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    On an unknown date, human remains representing a minimum of one 
individual were removed from either Culberson, El Paso, or Hudspeth 
County, TX by Dr. Wheat, or near Fort Bayard, Grant County, NM by Hugo 
G. Rodeck, the University of Colorado Museum's director from 1939 to 
1971. In November 2009, the human remains (a tooth) (TIN 0091) were 
found in the collection. The human remains have been identified as 
Mogollon- most likely Jornada Mogollon- based on the material culture 
collected from the same location. No known individual was identified. 
No associated funerary objects are present.
    On an unknown date, human remains representing a minimum of one 
individual were removed from ``Hueco Mountain area camps 1, 2, 3; Hot 
Wells Section; below Basketmaker caves,'' in El Paso or Hudspeth 
Counties, TX by Dr. Wheat. In November 2009, the human remains (a 
tooth) (TIN 0162) were found in the collection. The human remains have 
been identified as Jornada Mogollon based on the provenience. No known 
individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    On an unknown date, human remains representing a minimum of three 
individuals were removed from the Hueco Mountains, El Paso and Hudspeth 
Counties, TX by Dr. Wheat. In November 2009, the human remains (a tooth 
(TIN 0195) and two vertebrae (TIN 0257) and (TIN 0458)) were found in 
the collection. The human remains have been identified as Jornada 
Mogollon based on other material culture collected from the same 
location. No known individuals were identified. One funerary object, a 
projectile point, is associated with one of the vertebrae (TIN 0458).
    On an unknown date, human remains representing a minimum of one 
individual were removed from Hudspeth County, TX by Dr. Wheat. In 
November 2009, the human remains (a tooth) (TIN 0186) were found in the 
collection. The human remains have been identified as Jornada Mogollon 
based on other material culture collected from the same location. No 
known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.

Determinations Made by the University of Colorado Museum

    Officials of the University of Colorado Museum have determined 
that:
     Based on locational information and the material culture 
believed to have come from those same locations, the human remains are 
Native American.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), a relationship of shared 
group identity cannot be reasonably traced between the Native American 
human remains and associated funerary object and any present-day Indian 
tribe.
     According to final judgments of the Indian Claims 
Commission, the land from which the Native American human remains and 
associated funerary object were removed is the aboriginal land of the 
Fort Sill Apache Tribe of Oklahoma; Mescalero Apache Tribe of the 
Mescalero Reservation, New Mexico; White Mountain Apache Tribe of the 
Fort Apache Reservation, Arizona; and Ysleta del Sur Pueblo of Texas.
     Multiple lines of evidence, including treaties, Acts of 
Congress, and Executive Orders, indicate that the land from which the 
Native American human remains and associated funerary object were 
removed is the aboriginal land of the Apache Tribe of Oklahoma; Fort 
Sill Apache Tribe of Oklahoma; Jicarilla Apache Nation, New Mexico; 
Mescalero Apache Tribe of the Mescalero Reservation, New Mexico; San 
Carlos Apache of the San Carlos Reservation, Arizona; Tonto Apache 
Tribe of Arizona; and White Mountain Apache Tribe of the Fort Apache 
Reservation, Arizona.
     Other credible lines of evidence indicate that the land 
from which the Native American human remains and associated funerary 
object were removed is the aboriginal land of the Hopi Tribe of 
Arizona; Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; Pueblo of Zia, New Mexico; and 
Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described 
above represent the physical remains of seven individuals of Native 
American ancestry.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the one object described 
above is reasonably believed to have been placed with or near 
individual human remains

[[Page 62835]]

at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony.
     Pursuant to 43 CFR 10.11(c)(1), the disposition of the 
human remains and associated funerary object is to the Pueblo of Acoma, 
New Mexico.

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes itself to be 
culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary 
object, or any other Indian tribe that believes it satisfies the 
criteria in 43 CFR 10.11(c)(1) should contact Steve Lekson, Curator of 
Anthropology, University of Colorado Museum, Campus Box 218, Boulder, 
CO 80309, telephone (303) 492-6671, before November 10, 2011. 
Disposition of the human remains and associated funerary object to the 
Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico, may proceed after that date if no 
additional claimants come forward.
    The University of Colorado Museum is responsible for notifying The 
Tribes that this notice has been published.

    Dated: October 3, 2011.
Sherry Hutt,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2011-26153 Filed 10-7-11; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-P