Agency Information Collection Agencies: New Collection; Comments Requested, Census of Problem-Solving Courts 2011, 53489-53491 [2011-21888]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 166 / Friday, August 26, 2011 / Notices We will summarize written responses to this notice and address them in our ICR submission for OMB approval, including appropriate adjustments to the estimated burden. We will provide a copy of the ICR to you without charge upon request. Public Comment Policy: Before including your address, phone number, e-mail address, or other personal identifying information in your comment, be advised that your entire comment—including your personal identifying information—may be made publicly available at any time. While you can ask us in your comment to withhold from public review your personal identifying information, we cannot guarantee that we will be able to do so. ONRR Information Collection Clearance Officer: Armand Southall (303) 231–3221. Dated: August 23, 2011. Gregory J. Gould, Director for Office of Natural Resources Revenue. [FR Doc. 2011–21911 Filed 8–25–11; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4310–MR–P INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 337–TA–736] Certain Wind and Solar-Powered Light Posts and Street Lamps; Notice of Commission Determination Not To Review an Initial Determination Granting Complainants’ Unopposed Motion To Terminate the Investigation Based on the Withdrawal of the Complaint; Termination of the Investigation U.S. International Trade Commission. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: Notice is hereby given that the U.S. International Trade Commission has determined not to review an initial determination (‘‘ID’’) (Order No. 20) of the presiding administrative law judge (‘‘ALJ’’) granting complainants’ motion to terminate the investigation based on the withdrawal of the complaint in the above-referenced investigation. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Jia Chen, Office of the General Counsel, U.S. International Trade Commission, 500 E Street, SW., Washington, DC 20436, telephone (202) 708–4737. Copies of non-confidential documents filed in connection with this investigation are or will be available for inspection during official business emcdonald on DSK2BSOYB1PROD with NOTICES SUMMARY: VerDate Mar<15>2010 19:37 Aug 25, 2011 Jkt 223001 hours (8:45 a.m. to 5:15 p.m.) in the Office of the Secretary, U.S. International Trade Commission, 500 E Street, SW., Washington, DC 20436, telephone (202) 205–2000. General information concerning the Commission may also be obtained by accessing its Internet server at http://www.usitc.gov. The public record for this investigation may be viewed on the Commission’s electronic docket (EDIS) at http:// edis.usitc.gov. Hearing-impaired persons are advised that information on this matter can be obtained by contacting the Commission’s TDD terminal on (202) 205–1810. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Commission instituted this investigation on September 27, 2010, based on a complaint filed by Duggal Dimensions LLC; Duggal Energy Solutions, LLC; and Duggal Visual Solutions, Inc., collectively of New York, New York. 75 FR 59291 (Sept. 27, 2010). The complaint alleged violations of Section 337 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended, 19 U.S.C. 1337, in the importation into the United States, the sale for importation, and the sale within the United States after importation of certain wind and solar-powered light posts and street lamps by reason of infringement of certain claims of U.S. Patent No. D610,732. The complaint named Gus Power Inc. of Mississauga, Ontario, Canada; Efston Science, Inc. of Toronto, Ontario, Canada; King Luminaire, Inc. of Jefferson, Ohio; and The StressCrete Group of Burlington, Ontario as respondents. On July 29, 2011, the ALJ issued an ID (Order No. 18) extending the target date of the investigation by approximately two months from January 27, 2012 to March 16, 2012 on the basis of the parties’ delay to the procedural schedule. On August 1, 2011, complainants filed an unopposed motion to terminate the investigation based on the withdrawal of the complaint, stating that the private parties have entered into a written settlement agreement (‘‘Settlement Agreement’’). Public and confidential versions of the Settlement Agreement were attached to the motion. The motion also stated that there are no other agreements, written or oral, express or implied, between the parties concerning the subjection matter of this investigation. On August 2, 2011, the ALJ issued the subject ID granting complainants’ unopposed motion. The public version of the Settlement Agreement is attached to the ID. The ALJ found that complainants’ motion complies with Commission Rule 210.21(a). In the ID, the ALJ also denied PO 00000 Frm 00093 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 53489 a previous motion by respondents to terminate the investigation (Motion Docket No. 736–018) and a motion in limine by complainants to exclude the testimony of respondents’ experts (Motion Docket No. 736–716), because the motions are moot. The Commission has determined not to review the subject ID. The Commission notes that as a result, the ID extending the target date of the investigation is moot. The authority for the Commission’s determination is contained in Section 337 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended (19 U.S.C. 1337), and in section 210.42 of the Commission’s Rules of Practice and Procedure (19 CFR 210.42). By order of the Commission. Issued: August 23, 2011. James R. Holbein, Secretary to the Commission. [FR Doc. 2011–21893 Filed 8–25–11; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 7020–02–P DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Office of Justice Programs [OMB Number 1121–NEW] Agency Information Collection Agencies: New Collection; Comments Requested, Census of ProblemSolving Courts 2011 60-Day notice of information collection under review. ACTION: The Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Bureau of Justice Statistics, will be submitting the following information collection request for review and clearance in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995. The proposed information is published to obtain comments from the public and affected agencies. Comments are encouraged and will be accepted for ‘‘sixty days’’ until October 25, 2011. This process is conducted in accordance with 5 CFR 1320.10. If you have additional comments, especially on the estimated public burden or associated response time, suggestions, or need a copy of the proposed information collection instrument with instructions or additional information, please contact: Ron Malega, 202–353–0487, Bureau of Justice Statistics, Office of Justice Programs, Department of Justice, 810 Seventh Street, NW., Washington DC 20531 or Ronald.Malega@usdoj.gov. Written comments concerning this information collection should be sent to the Office of Information and Regulatory E:\FR\FM\26AUN1.SGM 26AUN1 emcdonald on DSK2BSOYB1PROD with NOTICES 53490 Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 166 / Friday, August 26, 2011 / Notices Affairs, Office of Management and Budget, Attn: DOJ Desk Officer. The best way to ensure your comments are received is to e-mail them to oira_submission@omb.eop.gov or fax them to 202–395–7285. All comments should reference the 8 digit OMB number for the collection or the title of the collection. If you have questions concerning the collection, please call Ron Malega at 202–353–0487 or the DOJ Desk Officer at 202–395–3176. Written comments and suggestions from the public and affected agencies concerning the proposed collection of information are encouraged. Your comments should address one or more of the following four points: 1. Evaluate whether the proposed collection of information is necessary for the proper performance of the functions of the agency, including whether the information will have practical utility; 2. Evaluate the accuracy of the agency’s estimate of the burden of the proposed collection of information, including the validity of the methodology and assumptions used; 3. Enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; and 4. Minimize the burden of collection of information on those who are to respond, including through the use of appropriate automated, electronic, mechanical, or other technological collection techniques or other forms of information technology, e.g., permitting electronic submission of responses. Overview of this information: 1. Type of information collection: New data collection, Census of ProblemSolving Courts (CPSC), 2011 2. The title of the form/collection: Census of Problem-Solving Courts or CPSC, 2011 3. The agency form number, if any, and the applicable component of the Department sponsoring the collection: The form labels are CPSC, Bureau of Justice Statistics, Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice. 4. Affected Public Who Will be Asked or Required to Respond, as well as a Brief Abstract: Problem-solving courts at all levels of government. Abstract: The Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) proposes to implement a Census of Problem-Solving Courts (CPSC). Problem-solving courts target defendants who have ongoing social and/or psychological conditions that underlie their repeated contact with the criminal justice system. Most of the existing information about problemsolving courts (PSC) consists of court evaluations or outcome analyses. No prior census of these courts has been VerDate Mar<15>2010 19:37 Aug 25, 2011 Jkt 223001 conducted to date despite the substantial proliferation of such courts during the past thirty years. Hence, the CPSC will allow BJS to provide national level information on problem-solving courts and case processing statistics and it will also create a sampling frame of PSCs thereby enabling BJS to conduct future sample-based research on PSCs. The CPSC is designed to provide BJS and other interested stakeholders with the first systematic empirical information on problem-solving courts. A goal of the census is to obtain information on problem-solving court operations, administration, and to generate accurate and reliable statistics on adult offenders who enter problemsolving court programs. The CPSC will collect information on the following categories: a. Court Operations i. Does the court operate within the judiciary, have a dedicated judicial officer, or have a dedicated docket/ calendar? ii. Provide the number of problemsolving courts by type (e.g., mental health, drug, etc.) iii. Determine PSCs level of government operations (e.g., local, state, etc.), court jurisdiction (e.g., limited, general, other) and intake of felony, misdemeanor, or status offenses b. Funding: Types and prevalence of PSC funding (e.g., local government budget, state budget, etc.) c. Commonly Used Services: i. Count the types and prevalence of offender/victim services (e.g., anger management), counseling or treatment services (e.g., outpatient mental health treatment), and general supportive services (e.g., life skills) d. Participant participation i. Participant inclusionary and exclusionary factors, ii. Participant point of entry (e.g. preplea, post-plea/pre-sentence, etc.) e. Capacity and Enrollment i. Total number of active participants PSC can manage at any one time ii. Current number of active participants f. Data Collection Practices: i. Use of automated case management systems ii. PSCs’ ability to query information g. PSC Participant information: i. Percentage of program participants by age, gender, racial classification, ii. Housing status iii. Employment status h. PSC information for calendar year 2011 only: i. Number or people referred and admitted to PSCs, ii. PSCs average participant attendance to: scheduled judicial, PO 00000 Frm 00094 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 community supervision meetings, treatment sessions, and drug tests iii. Number or participants exiting program, iv. Number of participants by gender, race, and age. Additionally, the information collected through this census will support development of a sampling framework to examine case processing information and case dispositions of adults in problem-solving courts. Information will be collected for the 2011 calendar year. 5. An Estimate of the Total Number of Respondents and the Amount of Time Estimated for an Average Respondent to Respond: Estimates suggest 3,800 respondents will take part in the Census of Problem-Solving Courts 2011. The average (mean) burden for each completed survey is almost 1 hour per respondent. The estimated range of burden for respondents is between 40 minutes to 2 hours for completion. The following factors were considered when creating the burden estimate: the total number of drug courts in the field, the total number of mental health courts, the ability of problem-solving courts (by type) to access data, and the type of data capabilities generally found in the field. Using these criteria, respondents were categorized into three groups depending upon whether they had the capacity to complete only part I or both parts (I&II) of the survey. Group A respondents will have the least access to data and complete only part one of the survey. Approximately 2,300 respondents will be in this group. It is estimated that respondents in group A will take 40 minutes to complete the survey. Group (B) respondents will complete part one of the survey and have access to only limited information necessary for part two of the survey. Approximately 1,200 respondents will be in this group. This second group of respondents will take about 1 hour and 15 minutes to complete a survey. The third group (C) of respondents will complete parts one and two of the survey; they will have the greatest access to the information required for part two of the survey. Approximately 300 respondents will be in group C. It is estimated it will take this group about 2 hours to complete the survey. 6. An Estimate of the Total Public Burden (in hours) Associated with the collection: The estimated public burden associated with this collection is 3,633 hours. Respondents were categorized into three groups depending upon whether they had the capacity to complete only part I or both parts (I&II) of the survey. Approximately 2,300 respondents will fall into the first group E:\FR\FM\26AUN1.SGM 26AUN1 Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 166 / Friday, August 26, 2011 / Notices (A) of respondents, completing only part one of the survey. It is estimated that respondents in this group will take 40 minutes to complete a survey for a total of 1,533 hours. The second group (B) of respondents will complete part one of the survey and have access to only limited amount of information necessary for part two of the survey. The approximately 1,200 respondents in this second group of respondents will take about 1 hour and 15 minutes to complete a survey for a total of 1,500 hours. The third group (C) of respondents will complete parts one and two of the survey; they will have the greatest access to the information required for part two of the survey. It is estimated it will take the estimated 300 respondents in this group about 2 hours each to complete a survey for a total of 600 hours. When the burden hours for each group of respondents are added up the CPSC 2011 project sums to 3,633 hours (1,533 + 1,500 + 600 = 3,633). If additional information is required contact: Jerri Murray, Department Clearance Officer, United States Department of Justice, Justice Management Division, Policy and Planning Staff, Two Constitution Square, 145 N Street, NE., Suite 2E–502, Washington, DC 20530. Jerri Murray, Department Clearance Officer, PRA, U.S. Department of Justice. [FR Doc. 2011–21888 Filed 8–25–11; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4410–18–P DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Office of the Secretary Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Family and Medical Leave Act Employer and Employee Surveys, 2011 ACTION: Notice. The Department of Labor (DOL) is submitting the proposed Wage and Hour Division (WHD) sponsored information collection request (ICR) titled, ‘‘Family and Medical Leave Act Employer and Employee Surveys, 2011,’’ to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and approval for use in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act (PRA) of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 3501 et seq.). DATES: Submit comments on or before September 26, 2011. ADDRESSES: A copy of this ICR with applicable supporting documentation; including a description of the likely emcdonald on DSK2BSOYB1PROD with NOTICES SUMMARY: VerDate Mar<15>2010 19:37 Aug 25, 2011 Jkt 223001 respondents, proposed frequency of response, and estimated total burden may be obtained from the RegInfo.gov Web site, http://www.reginfo.gov/ public/do/PRAMain, on the day following publication of this notice or by contacting Michel Smyth by telephone at 202–693–4129 (this is not a toll-free number) or sending an e-mail to DOL_PRA_PUBLIC@dol.gov. Submit comments about this request to the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, Attn: OMB Desk Officer for the Department of Labor, Wage and Hour Division (WHD), Office of Management and Budget, Room 10235, Washington, DC 20503, Telephone: 202–395–6929/Fax: 202– 395–6881 (these are not toll-free numbers), e-mail: OIRA_submission@omb.eop.gov. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Michel Smyth by telephone at 202–693– 4129 (this is not a toll-free number) or by e-mail at DOL_PRA_PUBLIC@dol.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Wage and Hour Division (WHD) administers the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA), 29 U.S.C. 2601 et seq., 29 CFR part 825. In 1996 and 2000, the Federal government funded the collection of nationally representative data on the FMLA from employers and employees. Given changes in economic conditions and the FMLA since the last employer and employee surveys, the WHD proposes to conduct an employer survey and an employee survey to obtain current representative data for FMLA leave usage in light of 18 years of administering the law and in light of changes to FMLA leave brought on by amendments to the FMLA. The survey data will provide an update to DOL’s understanding of leave-taking behavior and employer/employee experiences with the FMLA. This information collection is subject to the PRA. A Federal agency generally cannot conduct or sponsor a collection of information, and the public is generally not required to respond to an information collection, unless it is approved by the OMB under the PRA and displays a currently valid OMB Control Number. In addition, notwithstanding any other provisions of law, no person shall generally be subject to penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if the collection of information does not display a valid OMB Control Number. See 5 CFR 1320.5(a) and 1320.6. This request for a new OMB Control Number is being submitted under ICR Reference Number 201105–1235–001. For additional information, see the related PO 00000 Frm 00095 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 9990 53491 notice published in the Federal Register on April 1, 2011 (76 FR 18254). Interested parties are encouraged to send comments to the OMB, Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs at the address shown in the ADDRESSES section within 30 days of publication of this notice in the Federal Register. In order to help ensure appropriate consideration, comments should identify ICR reference number 201105– 1235–001. The OMB is particularly interested in comments that: • Evaluate whether the proposed collection of information is necessary for the proper performance of the functions of the agency, including whether the information will have practical utility; • Evaluate the accuracy of the agency’s estimate of the burden of the proposed collection of information, including the validity of the methodology and assumptions used; • Enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; and • Minimize the burden of the collection of information on those who are to respond, including through the use of appropriate automated, electronic, mechanical, or other technological collection techniques or other forms of information technology, e.g., permitting electronic submission of responses. Agency: Wage and Hour Division. Title of Collection: Family and Medical Leave Act Employer and Employee Surveys, 2011. OMB ICR Reference Number: 201105– 1235–001. Affected Public: Individuals or Households; Private Sector—Businesses, Farms, and Not-for-profit entities. Total Estimated Number of Respondents: 21,072. Total Estimated Number of Responses: 21,072. Total Estimated Annual Burden Hours: 138,472. Total Estimated Annual Other Costs Burden: $0. Dated: August 19, 2011. Michel Smyth, Departmental Clearance Officer. [FR Doc. 2011–21849 Filed 8–25–11; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4510–27–P E:\FR\FM\26AUN1.SGM 26AUN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 76, Number 166 (Friday, August 26, 2011)]
[Notices]
[Pages 53489-53491]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2011-21888]


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DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE

Office of Justice Programs

[OMB Number 1121-NEW]


Agency Information Collection Agencies: New Collection; Comments 
Requested, Census of Problem-Solving Courts 2011

ACTION: 60-Day notice of information collection under review.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Bureau of 
Justice Statistics, will be submitting the following information 
collection request for review and clearance in accordance with the 
Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995. The proposed information is published 
to obtain comments from the public and affected agencies. Comments are 
encouraged and will be accepted for ``sixty days'' until October 25, 
2011. This process is conducted in accordance with 5 CFR 1320.10.
    If you have additional comments, especially on the estimated public 
burden or associated response time, suggestions, or need a copy of the 
proposed information collection instrument with instructions or 
additional information, please contact: Ron Malega, 202-353-0487, 
Bureau of Justice Statistics, Office of Justice Programs, Department of 
Justice, 810 Seventh Street, NW., Washington DC 20531 or 
Ronald.Malega@usdoj.gov.
    Written comments concerning this information collection should be 
sent to the Office of Information and Regulatory

[[Page 53490]]

Affairs, Office of Management and Budget, Attn: DOJ Desk Officer. The 
best way to ensure your comments are received is to e-mail them to 
oira_submission@omb.eop.gov or fax them to 202-395-7285. All comments 
should reference the 8 digit OMB number for the collection or the title 
of the collection. If you have questions concerning the collection, 
please call Ron Malega at 202-353-0487 or the DOJ Desk Officer at 202-
395-3176.
    Written comments and suggestions from the public and affected 
agencies concerning the proposed collection of information are 
encouraged. Your comments should address one or more of the following 
four points:
    1. Evaluate whether the proposed collection of information is 
necessary for the proper performance of the functions of the agency, 
including whether the information will have practical utility;
    2. Evaluate the accuracy of the agency's estimate of the burden of 
the proposed collection of information, including the validity of the 
methodology and assumptions used;
    3. Enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to 
be collected; and
    4. Minimize the burden of collection of information on those who 
are to respond, including through the use of appropriate automated, 
electronic, mechanical, or other technological collection techniques or 
other forms of information technology, e.g., permitting electronic 
submission of responses.
    Overview of this information:
    1. Type of information collection: New data collection, Census of 
Problem-Solving Courts (CPSC), 2011
    2. The title of the form/collection: Census of Problem-Solving 
Courts or CPSC, 2011
    3. The agency form number, if any, and the applicable component of 
the Department sponsoring the collection: The form labels are CPSC, 
Bureau of Justice Statistics, Office of Justice Programs, U.S. 
Department of Justice.
    4. Affected Public Who Will be Asked or Required to Respond, as 
well as a Brief Abstract: Problem-solving courts at all levels of 
government. Abstract: The Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) proposes 
to implement a Census of Problem-Solving Courts (CPSC). Problem-solving 
courts target defendants who have ongoing social and/or psychological 
conditions that underlie their repeated contact with the criminal 
justice system. Most of the existing information about problem-solving 
courts (PSC) consists of court evaluations or outcome analyses. No 
prior census of these courts has been conducted to date despite the 
substantial proliferation of such courts during the past thirty years. 
Hence, the CPSC will allow BJS to provide national level information on 
problem-solving courts and case processing statistics and it will also 
create a sampling frame of PSCs thereby enabling BJS to conduct future 
sample-based research on PSCs. The CPSC is designed to provide BJS and 
other interested stakeholders with the first systematic empirical 
information on problem-solving courts. A goal of the census is to 
obtain information on problem-solving court operations, administration, 
and to generate accurate and reliable statistics on adult offenders who 
enter problem-solving court programs. The CPSC will collect information 
on the following categories:
    a. Court Operations
    i. Does the court operate within the judiciary, have a dedicated 
judicial officer, or have a dedicated docket/calendar?
    ii. Provide the number of problem-solving courts by type (e.g., 
mental health, drug, etc.)
    iii. Determine PSCs level of government operations (e.g., local, 
state, etc.), court jurisdiction (e.g., limited, general, other) and 
intake of felony, misdemeanor, or status offenses
    b. Funding: Types and prevalence of PSC funding (e.g., local 
government budget, state budget, etc.)
    c. Commonly Used Services:
    i. Count the types and prevalence of offender/victim services 
(e.g., anger management), counseling or treatment services (e.g., 
outpatient mental health treatment), and general supportive services 
(e.g., life skills)
    d. Participant participation
    i. Participant inclusionary and exclusionary factors,
    ii. Participant point of entry (e.g. pre-plea, post-plea/pre-
sentence, etc.)
    e. Capacity and Enrollment
    i. Total number of active participants PSC can manage at any one 
time
    ii. Current number of active participants
    f. Data Collection Practices:
    i. Use of automated case management systems
    ii. PSCs' ability to query information
    g. PSC Participant information:
    i. Percentage of program participants by age, gender, racial 
classification,
    ii. Housing status
    iii. Employment status
    h. PSC information for calendar year 2011 only:
    i. Number or people referred and admitted to PSCs,
    ii. PSCs average participant attendance to: scheduled judicial, 
community supervision meetings, treatment sessions, and drug tests
    iii. Number or participants exiting program,
    iv. Number of participants by gender, race, and age.
    Additionally, the information collected through this census will 
support development of a sampling framework to examine case processing 
information and case dispositions of adults in problem-solving courts. 
Information will be collected for the 2011 calendar year.
    5. An Estimate of the Total Number of Respondents and the Amount of 
Time Estimated for an Average Respondent to Respond: Estimates suggest 
3,800 respondents will take part in the Census of Problem-Solving 
Courts 2011. The average (mean) burden for each completed survey is 
almost 1 hour per respondent. The estimated range of burden for 
respondents is between 40 minutes to 2 hours for completion. The 
following factors were considered when creating the burden estimate: 
the total number of drug courts in the field, the total number of 
mental health courts, the ability of problem-solving courts (by type) 
to access data, and the type of data capabilities generally found in 
the field. Using these criteria, respondents were categorized into 
three groups depending upon whether they had the capacity to complete 
only part I or both parts (I&II) of the survey. Group A respondents 
will have the least access to data and complete only part one of the 
survey. Approximately 2,300 respondents will be in this group. It is 
estimated that respondents in group A will take 40 minutes to complete 
the survey. Group (B) respondents will complete part one of the survey 
and have access to only limited information necessary for part two of 
the survey. Approximately 1,200 respondents will be in this group. This 
second group of respondents will take about 1 hour and 15 minutes to 
complete a survey. The third group (C) of respondents will complete 
parts one and two of the survey; they will have the greatest access to 
the information required for part two of the survey. Approximately 300 
respondents will be in group C. It is estimated it will take this group 
about 2 hours to complete the survey.
    6. An Estimate of the Total Public Burden (in hours) Associated 
with the collection: The estimated public burden associated with this 
collection is 3,633 hours. Respondents were categorized into three 
groups depending upon whether they had the capacity to complete only 
part I or both parts (I&II) of the survey. Approximately 2,300 
respondents will fall into the first group

[[Page 53491]]

(A) of respondents, completing only part one of the survey. It is 
estimated that respondents in this group will take 40 minutes to 
complete a survey for a total of 1,533 hours. The second group (B) of 
respondents will complete part one of the survey and have access to 
only limited amount of information necessary for part two of the 
survey. The approximately 1,200 respondents in this second group of 
respondents will take about 1 hour and 15 minutes to complete a survey 
for a total of 1,500 hours. The third group (C) of respondents will 
complete parts one and two of the survey; they will have the greatest 
access to the information required for part two of the survey. It is 
estimated it will take the estimated 300 respondents in this group 
about 2 hours each to complete a survey for a total of 600 hours. When 
the burden hours for each group of respondents are added up the CPSC 
2011 project sums to 3,633 hours (1,533 + 1,500 + 600 = 3,633).
    If additional information is required contact: Jerri Murray, 
Department Clearance Officer, United States Department of Justice, 
Justice Management Division, Policy and Planning Staff, Two 
Constitution Square, 145 N Street, NE., Suite 2E-502, Washington, DC 
20530.

Jerri Murray,
Department Clearance Officer, PRA, U.S. Department of Justice.
[FR Doc. 2011-21888 Filed 8-25-11; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4410-18-P