Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the Sheep Mountain Uranium Project, Fremont County, WY, 52688-52690 [2011-21563]

Download as PDF mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES 52688 Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 163 / Tuesday, August 23, 2011 / Notices amendment with an associated EA. Comments on issues may be submitted in writing until September 22, 2011. The date(s) and location(s) of any scoping meetings will be announced at least 15 days in advance through local media, newspapers and the BLM Web site at: http://www.blm.gov/id/st/en/ info/nepa.html. In order to be included in the EA, all comments must be received prior to the close of the 30-day scoping period or 30 days after the last public meeting, whichever is later. ADDRESSES: You may submit comments on issues and planning criteria related to Castle Rocks and Cedar Fields Land Use Plan Amendment by any of the following methods: • Web site: http://www.blm.gov/id/st/ en/info/nepa.html • E-mail: id_burley_fo_@blm.gov • Fax: 208–677–6699 • Mail: 15 East 200 South, Burley, Idaho 83318 Documents pertinent to this proposal may be examined at the Burley Field Office. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Contact Dennis Thompson, Outdoor Recreation Planner, for further information and/or to have your name added to the Burley BLM’s mailing list, at telephone 208–677–6664; address 15 East 200 South, Burley, Idaho 83318; or e-mail dennis_thompson@blm.gov. Persons who use a telecommunications device for the deaf (TDD) may call the Federal Information Relay Service (FIRS) at 1–800–877–8339 to contact the above individual during normal business hours. The FIRS is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, to leave a message or question with the above individual. You will receive a reply during normal business hours. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: This document provides notice that the BLM Field Office, Burley Idaho, intends to prepare an RMP Amendment with an associated EA for the Cassia and Monument RMPs, announces the beginning of the the scoping process, and is seeking public input on issues and planning criteria. The planning area is located in Cassia and Power Counties, Idaho and encompasses approximately 1,556 acres of public land. The purpose of the public scoping process is to determine relevant issues that will influence the scope of the environmental analysis, including alternatives, and guide the planning process. The BLM has identified the following preliminary issues: the potential for damage to cultural resources within the American Falls Archeological District at Cedar Fields from rock climbing and other VerDate Mar<15>2010 16:33 Aug 22, 2011 Jkt 223001 recreational activities; potential adverse affects on Historic Properties at Castle Rocks from rock climbing and other recreational activities; and the impact that closures to certain activities would have on recreational climbing in the area. At Cedar Fields, ongoing climbing activities have the potential to damage cultural resources located within an Archeological District. In 2010, the BLM prepared an EA to address similar concerns at Castle Rocks. The proposed action within the Castle Rocks EA would have allowed limited climbing and trail construction. However, due to potential adverse cumulative effects of rock climbing activities on Historic Properties (as defined in 36 CFR 800.5(a)(1) and 800.16(l)(1)), a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) could not be reached for the Castle Rocks EA (EA ID–220–2009–EA–3768). The EA was finalized on March 29, 2010, sent out to interested members of the public, and posted to the BLM Idaho Web site. Subsequently, a temporary closure notice was published in the Federal Register in November 2010, which closed BLM-managed lands in the Castle Rocks Inter-Agency Recreation Area to climbing, staging, camping, and construction of new trails. This closure will remain in effect until November 16, 2012. The RMP Amendment and associated EA will consider the permanent designation of no climbing, no staging, no camping, and no construction of new trails on BLM-managed lands at Castle Rocks Inter-Agency Recreation Area and at Cedar Fields. If a closure is necessary to protect Historic Properties at Castle Rocks and cultural resources in the Archeological District at Cedar Fields, the BLM will make a decision about whether to amend the Cassia and Monument RMPs and will address allowable uses of resources, and intensity and limits of use. You may submit comments on issues and planning criteria for the Plan Amendments in writing to the BLM at any public scoping meeting, or you may submit them to the BLM using one of the methods listed in the ADDRESSES section above. To be most helpful, you should submit comments by the close of the 30-day scoping period or within 30 days after the last public meeting, whichever is later. Before including your address, phone number, e-mail address, or other personal identifying information in your comment, you should be aware that your entire comment—including your personal identifying information—may be made publicly available at any time. While you can ask us in your comment to PO 00000 Frm 00056 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 withhold your personal identifying information from public review, we cannot guarantee that we will be able to do so. The BLM will use an interdisciplinary approach to develop the plan in order to consider the variety of resource issues and concerns identified. Specialists with expertise in the following disciplines will be involved in the planning process: minerals and geology, outdoor recreation, archaeology, wildlife, and soils. Authority: 40 CFR 1501.7 and 43 CFR 1610.2 Michael Courtney, Field Manager. [FR Doc. 2011–21560 Filed 8–22–11; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4310–GG–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management [LLWYR05000 L51100000.GN0000. LVEMK11CW630] Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the Sheep Mountain Uranium Project, Fremont County, WY Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: Pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, as amended (NEPA) and the Federal Land Policy and Management Act, as amended (FLPMA), and in response to a proposal filed by Titan Uranium USA, Inc. (Titan), the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Lander Field Office, Wyoming, intends to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and by this notice is announcing the beginning of the scoping process to solicit public comments regarding issues and resource information for the proposed Sheep Mountain Uranium Project (the Project) in Fremont County, Wyoming. The Project is a conventional uranium exploration and development project employing open pit and underground mining methods and using heap leach methods for uranium recovery. DATES: This notice initiates the public scoping process. The BLM can best consider public input if comments and resource information are submitted within 45 days of publication of this notice. To provide the public with an opportunity to review the proposal and project information, the BLM will host public meetings in Lander, Riverton, and Jeffrey City, Wyoming. The BLM SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\23AUN1.SGM 23AUN1 mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 163 / Tuesday, August 23, 2011 / Notices will announce the dates, times, and locations for these meetings at least 15 days prior to each event. Announcements will be made by news release to the news media, individual letter mailings, and posting on the project Web site listed below. Project information and documents including the submitted Plan of Operations also will be available on the Project Web site. ADDRESSES: You may submit written comments by any of the following methods: • E-mail: Sheep_Mountain_Uranium_ EIS_WY@BLM.gov • Mail: Lander Field Office, Attn: Kristin Yannone, Project Manager, 1335 Main Street, Lander, Wyoming 82520 • Project Web site: http://www.blm. gov/wy/st/en/info/NEPA/documents/ lfo/sheepmtn.html Documents pertinent to this proposal may be examined at the Lander Field Office. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Kristin Yannone, Project Manager, telephone 307–332–8400; address 1335 Main Street, Lander, WY 82520; e-mail Kristin_Yannone@blm.gov. Persons who use a telecommunications device for the deaf (TDD) may call the Federal Information Relay Service (FIRS) at 1– 800–877–8339 to contact the above individual during normal business hours. The FIRS is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, to leave a message or question with the above individual. You will receive a reply during normal business hours. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Project is located 8 road miles south of Jeffrey City, Wyoming in Fremont County, Sixth Principal Meridian, Township 28 North, Range 92 West, Sections 16, 17, 20, 21, 22, 27, 28, 29, 32, and 33 in an area of historic uranium mining development, the earliest of which dates back to the 1950s. This area lies 62 road miles southeast of Riverton, Wyoming and 105 road miles west of Casper, Wyoming in the Crooks Gap Mining District. The project area, which is the same area covered by an existing State of Wyoming mining permit, covers 3,625 surface acres of mixed ownership including 2,313 acres administered by the BLM, 768 acres under State ownership, and 544 acres of private lands. The project area includes 2,836 acres of Federal mineral estate. The BLM Lander Field Office will serve as the lead office for preparing the environmental analysis of the potential impacts of authorizing the surface disturbance for the Project on public lands under the BLM’s regulations at 43 CFR part 3809. The potential impacts of VerDate Mar<15>2010 16:33 Aug 22, 2011 Jkt 223001 constructing and operating a uranium recovery facility within the project boundary will be included in the BLM’s analysis. This uranium recovery facility requires a Source Materials License from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to operate in addition to a surface use authorization from the BLM. The BLM’s analysis of any potential impacts from granting surface use authorization for the uranium recovery facility are in addition to the environmental analysis conducted by the NRC as part of its permitting process. On June 16, 2011, Titan submitted its formal Plan of Operations in accordance with the BLM’s surface management regulations at 43 CFR 3809 to develop a conventional mining and heap leach recovery operation. The purpose of the Project is to identify mining reserves and extract 1.5 million to 2 million pounds of uranium per year over an anticipated project life of 15–20 years. The Project would use conventional open pit and modified room and pillar underground mining methods to extract the ore. Uranium recovery would be performed on-site using heap leach methods and a processing facility to produce yellowcake (uranium oxide-U3O8). Two new declines would be advanced from the surface to access existing underground workings for rehabilitation and further mine development. A series of double-lined pads and ponds would be constructed for the heap-leach facility and a new large building would house the site’s processing plant, with a smaller structure for administration and shop facilities. A total of 466 acres would be disturbed over the life of the mine. This disturbance would consist of 285 acres of new disturbance and 181 acres of existing disturbance which would be redisturbed. The 466 acres includes 104 acres for the heap leaching and plant operations and 362 acres for mining operations. No new disturbance would be required for access roads. Both the surface and underground mining may use diesel-powered equipment and blasting to extract and transport the ore to the heap-leach facility and the overburden materials to their temporary and final storage locations. All pit overburden would be temporarily stockpiled on the surface during the initial phases of mining. During later pit mining phases, the overburden and waste material would be stored within previously mined portions of the pit. After being received at the processing facility, ore would be placed on the double-lined leach pads using a radial PO 00000 Frm 00057 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 52689 belt conveyor. The heap-leach-recovery method applies a sulfuric acid solution (H2SO4) through low-flow emitters on top of the heap for extraction of the uranium mineral from the ore. After the solution containing uranium reaches the desired concentration, it would then be processed through either an ionexchange system or a solvent extraction system. Spent solutions and processliquid wastes would be managed in double-lined evaporation ponds on-site, no wastes would be discharged from the site. Individual heaps would be reclaimed in-place after the ore has been fully leached, rinsed of leachate, and drained. The Project activities would include the drilling of exploratory boreholes, construction of open mine pits, excavation of underground mine declines (low angle access tunnels) and underground mine workings using modified room and pillar methods, rehabilitation of existing mine shafts for ventilation, installation of monitoring wells, construction of uranium processing and waste-water treatment facilities, and development of new and improvement of existing access roads. Interim reclamation activities would be performed to minimize the amount of surface disturbance at any one time. Surface disturbance would be phased over several years, depending on the uranium production rate and the availability of mine construction equipment and personnel. Titan estimates that approximately 40 acres each year would be disturbed, undergo interim reclamation, and subsequently be returned to wildlife habitat to BLM and State of Wyoming reclamation standards. Final surface reclamation would also be required by regulatory agencies and assured by bonds. At the end of surface mining, all stockpiled overburden would be returned to the pits and the surface regraded with top soil and seeded for revegetation. All underground mining spoils would remain underground and would be reclaimed within the underground workings. Final reclamation plans include placing all pit mine overburden and spoils back in the mine pits, plugging and abandoning all ventilation shafts and access tunnels, removing all ponds and buried piping, and regrading and revegetating the disturbed surface with native plant species approved by the regulatory agencies. After vegetation has been reestablished, the mine surface would be returned to its premining use of livestock grazing and wildlife habitat or any uses consistent with the thenapplicable land use plan. E:\FR\FM\23AUN1.SGM 23AUN1 mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES 52690 Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 163 / Tuesday, August 23, 2011 / Notices Depending upon the residual radiological hazards present within the millsite restricted area, administrative jurisdiction of the reclaimed heaps may be required to be transferred to the Department of Energy for long-term custodial care until contamination is deemed no longer a threat to public health and safety. Titan estimates that the Project would employ a mix of full-time personnel and temporary contractors throughout the life of the mine. During the construction of each mine unit, 20 to 30 full-time employees plus 80 contractors would be employed. During mining operations, about 210 full-time employees plus another 40 contractors would be required. It is likely that the majority would live in Riverton and Lander. The Project is projected to provide an economic benefit through a variety of taxes paid to Federal, State, and local governments to include employee income taxes, severance taxes, property taxes, and sales taxes. The Project is in conformance with the Lander RMP/Final EIS and ROD, 1987. During the preparation of the EIS, interim exploration and development will be subject to development guidelines and decisions made in applicable NEPA documents, including the Lander RMP and any subsequent revisions. The EIS will analyze the environmental consequences of implementing the Project as proposed and alternatives, including a No Action Alternative. Other alternatives that may be considered in detail could include, for example, reclamation schedule adjustments, or perhaps a different pace of development. The Project would not impair lands with wilderness characteristics. The purpose of the public scoping process is to determine relevant issues that will influence the scope of the environmental analysis, including alternatives, and guide the process for developing the EIS. At present, the BLM has identified the following preliminary issues: air resources, water resources, wildlife and special status species, vegetative resources, grazing, concerns about risks from selenium, heavy metals and uranium, and long-term postclosure management. The BLM will utilize and coordinate the NEPA commenting process to help fulfill the public involvement process under Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act (16 U.S.C. 470f) as provided for in 36 CFR 800.2(d)(3). Native American tribal consultations will be conducted in accordance with policy, and tribal concerns will be given due consideration, including impacts on VerDate Mar<15>2010 16:33 Aug 22, 2011 Jkt 223001 Indian trust assets. Federal, State, and local agencies, along with other stakeholders who may be interested in or affected by the BLM’s decision on this project, are invited to participate in the scoping process and, if eligible, may request or be requested by the BLM to participate as a cooperating agency. Before including your address, phone number, e-mail address, or other personal identifying information in your comment, you should be aware that your entire comment—including your personal identifying information—may be made publicly available at any time. While you can ask us in your comment to withhold your personal identifying information from public review, we cannot guarantee that we will be able to do so. Teri Bakken, Chief, Fluids Adjudication Section, Bureau of Land Management Montana State Office, 5001 Southgate Drive, Billings, Montana 59101–4669, 406–896–5091, Teri_Bakken@blm.gov. Persons who use a telecommunications device for the deaf (TDD) may call the Federal Information Relay Service (FIRS) at 1–800–877–8339 to contact the above individual during normal business hours. The FIRS is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, to leave a message or question with the above individual. You will receive a reply during normal business hours. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Teri Bakken, Chief, Fluids Adjudication Section. [FR Doc. 2011–21568 Filed 8–22–11; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4310–DN–P Authority: 40 CFR 1501.7. Donald A. Simpson, State Director. DEPARTMENT OF INTERIOR [FR Doc. 2011–21563 Filed 8–22–11; 8:45 am] National Park Service BILLING CODE 4310–22–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management Final Environmental Impact Statement on Nabesna Off-Road Vehicle Management Plan, Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve National Park Service, Interior. Notice of Availability. AGENCY: [LLMT922200–11–L13100000–FI0000–P; NDM 94247, NDM 94249, and NDM 94263] Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Leases NDM 94247, NDM 94249, and NDM 94263 Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: Per 30 U.S.C. 188(d), Pride Energy Company timely filed a petition for reinstatement of competitive oil and gas leases NDM 94247, NDM 94249, and NDM 94263, Billings County, ND. The lessee paid the required rental accruing from the date of termination. No leases were issued that affect these lands. The lessee agrees to new lease terms for rentals and royalties, $10 per acre and 162⁄3 percent respectively. The lessee paid the $500 administration fee for the reinstatement of the lease and $163 cost for publishing this Notice. The lessee met the requirements for reinstatement of the lease per Sec. 31 (d) and (e) of the Mineral Leasing Act of 1920 (30 U.S.C. 188). We are proposing to reinstate the lease, effective the date of termination subject to: • The original terms and conditions of the lease; • The increased rental of $10 per acre; and • The increased royalty of 162⁄3 percent. SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00058 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 ACTION: Pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, 42 U.S.C. 4332(2)(C) the National Park Service (NPS) announces the availability of a Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) on Off-Road Vehicle Management in the Nabesna District of Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve. The FEIS evaluates the environmental impacts of a preferred alternative and four action alternatives for management of off-road vehicles in the Nabesna District. The purpose is to consider opportunities for appropriate and reasonable access to wilderness and backcountry recreational activities, which also accommodates subsistence and access to inholdings; while protecting scenic quality, fish and wildlife habitat, and other park resource values. A no action alternative is also evaluated. This notice officially begins the 30-day waiting period before the Record of Decision can be issued. ADDRESSES: Copies of the FEIS will be available for public review at http:// parkplanning.nps.gov/wrst. Hard copies are available at park headquarters, located at Milepost 106.8 on the Richardson Highway, or may be requested from Bruce Rogers, Project Manager, Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve, PO Box 439, Copper Center, Alaska 99573. SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\23AUN1.SGM 23AUN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 76, Number 163 (Tuesday, August 23, 2011)]
[Notices]
[Pages 52688-52690]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2011-21563]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

Bureau of Land Management

[LLWYR05000 L51100000.GN0000.LVEMK11CW630]


Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for 
the Sheep Mountain Uranium Project, Fremont County, WY

AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: Pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, as 
amended (NEPA) and the Federal Land Policy and Management Act, as 
amended (FLPMA), and in response to a proposal filed by Titan Uranium 
USA, Inc. (Titan), the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Lander Field 
Office, Wyoming, intends to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement 
(EIS) and by this notice is announcing the beginning of the scoping 
process to solicit public comments regarding issues and resource 
information for the proposed Sheep Mountain Uranium Project (the 
Project) in Fremont County, Wyoming. The Project is a conventional 
uranium exploration and development project employing open pit and 
underground mining methods and using heap leach methods for uranium 
recovery.

DATES: This notice initiates the public scoping process. The BLM can 
best consider public input if comments and resource information are 
submitted within 45 days of publication of this notice. To provide the 
public with an opportunity to review the proposal and project 
information, the BLM will host public meetings in Lander, Riverton, and 
Jeffrey City, Wyoming. The BLM

[[Page 52689]]

will announce the dates, times, and locations for these meetings at 
least 15 days prior to each event. Announcements will be made by news 
release to the news media, individual letter mailings, and posting on 
the project Web site listed below. Project information and documents 
including the submitted Plan of Operations also will be available on 
the Project Web site.

ADDRESSES: You may submit written comments by any of the following 
methods:
     E-mail: Sheep_Mountain_Uranium_EIS_WY@BLM.gov
     Mail: Lander Field Office, Attn: Kristin Yannone, Project 
Manager, 1335 Main Street, Lander, Wyoming 82520
     Project Web site: http://www.blm.gov/wy/st/en/info/NEPA/documents/lfo/sheepmtn.html
    Documents pertinent to this proposal may be examined at the Lander 
Field Office.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Kristin Yannone, Project Manager, 
telephone 307-332-8400; address 1335 Main Street, Lander, WY 82520; e-
mail Kristin_Yannone@blm.gov. Persons who use a telecommunications 
device for the deaf (TDD) may call the Federal Information Relay 
Service (FIRS) at 1-800-877-8339 to contact the above individual during 
normal business hours. The FIRS is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a 
week, to leave a message or question with the above individual. You 
will receive a reply during normal business hours.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Project is located 8 road miles south of 
Jeffrey City, Wyoming in Fremont County, Sixth Principal Meridian, 
Township 28 North, Range 92 West, Sections 16, 17, 20, 21, 22, 27, 28, 
29, 32, and 33 in an area of historic uranium mining development, the 
earliest of which dates back to the 1950s. This area lies 62 road miles 
southeast of Riverton, Wyoming and 105 road miles west of Casper, 
Wyoming in the Crooks Gap Mining District.
    The project area, which is the same area covered by an existing 
State of Wyoming mining permit, covers 3,625 surface acres of mixed 
ownership including 2,313 acres administered by the BLM, 768 acres 
under State ownership, and 544 acres of private lands. The project area 
includes 2,836 acres of Federal mineral estate. The BLM Lander Field 
Office will serve as the lead office for preparing the environmental 
analysis of the potential impacts of authorizing the surface 
disturbance for the Project on public lands under the BLM's regulations 
at 43 CFR part 3809. The potential impacts of constructing and 
operating a uranium recovery facility within the project boundary will 
be included in the BLM's analysis. This uranium recovery facility 
requires a Source Materials License from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory 
Commission (NRC) to operate in addition to a surface use authorization 
from the BLM. The BLM's analysis of any potential impacts from granting 
surface use authorization for the uranium recovery facility are in 
addition to the environmental analysis conducted by the NRC as part of 
its permitting process.
    On June 16, 2011, Titan submitted its formal Plan of Operations in 
accordance with the BLM's surface management regulations at 43 CFR 3809 
to develop a conventional mining and heap leach recovery operation.
    The purpose of the Project is to identify mining reserves and 
extract 1.5 million to 2 million pounds of uranium per year over an 
anticipated project life of 15-20 years. The Project would use 
conventional open pit and modified room and pillar underground mining 
methods to extract the ore. Uranium recovery would be performed on-site 
using heap leach methods and a processing facility to produce 
yellowcake (uranium oxide-U3O8). Two new declines 
would be advanced from the surface to access existing underground 
workings for rehabilitation and further mine development. A series of 
double-lined pads and ponds would be constructed for the heap-leach 
facility and a new large building would house the site's processing 
plant, with a smaller structure for administration and shop facilities.
    A total of 466 acres would be disturbed over the life of the mine. 
This disturbance would consist of 285 acres of new disturbance and 181 
acres of existing disturbance which would be re-disturbed. The 466 
acres includes 104 acres for the heap leaching and plant operations and 
362 acres for mining operations. No new disturbance would be required 
for access roads.
    Both the surface and underground mining may use diesel-powered 
equipment and blasting to extract and transport the ore to the heap-
leach facility and the overburden materials to their temporary and 
final storage locations. All pit overburden would be temporarily 
stockpiled on the surface during the initial phases of mining. During 
later pit mining phases, the overburden and waste material would be 
stored within previously mined portions of the pit.
    After being received at the processing facility, ore would be 
placed on the double-lined leach pads using a radial belt conveyor. The 
heap-leach-recovery method applies a sulfuric acid solution 
(H2SO4) through low-flow emitters on top of the 
heap for extraction of the uranium mineral from the ore. After the 
solution containing uranium reaches the desired concentration, it would 
then be processed through either an ion-exchange system or a solvent 
extraction system. Spent solutions and process-liquid wastes would be 
managed in double-lined evaporation ponds on-site, no wastes would be 
discharged from the site. Individual heaps would be reclaimed in-place 
after the ore has been fully leached, rinsed of leachate, and drained.
    The Project activities would include the drilling of exploratory 
boreholes, construction of open mine pits, excavation of underground 
mine declines (low angle access tunnels) and underground mine workings 
using modified room and pillar methods, rehabilitation of existing mine 
shafts for ventilation, installation of monitoring wells, construction 
of uranium processing and waste-water treatment facilities, and 
development of new and improvement of existing access roads. Interim 
reclamation activities would be performed to minimize the amount of 
surface disturbance at any one time.
    Surface disturbance would be phased over several years, depending 
on the uranium production rate and the availability of mine 
construction equipment and personnel. Titan estimates that 
approximately 40 acres each year would be disturbed, undergo interim 
reclamation, and subsequently be returned to wildlife habitat to BLM 
and State of Wyoming reclamation standards. Final surface reclamation 
would also be required by regulatory agencies and assured by bonds.
    At the end of surface mining, all stockpiled overburden would be 
returned to the pits and the surface regraded with top soil and seeded 
for revegetation. All underground mining spoils would remain 
underground and would be reclaimed within the underground workings. 
Final reclamation plans include placing all pit mine overburden and 
spoils back in the mine pits, plugging and abandoning all ventilation 
shafts and access tunnels, removing all ponds and buried piping, and 
regrading and revegetating the disturbed surface with native plant 
species approved by the regulatory agencies. After vegetation has been 
reestablished, the mine surface would be returned to its premining use 
of livestock grazing and wildlife habitat or any uses consistent with 
the then-applicable land use plan.

[[Page 52690]]

    Depending upon the residual radiological hazards present within the 
millsite restricted area, administrative jurisdiction of the reclaimed 
heaps may be required to be transferred to the Department of Energy for 
long-term custodial care until contamination is deemed no longer a 
threat to public health and safety.
    Titan estimates that the Project would employ a mix of full-time 
personnel and temporary contractors throughout the life of the mine. 
During the construction of each mine unit, 20 to 30 full-time employees 
plus 80 contractors would be employed. During mining operations, about 
210 full-time employees plus another 40 contractors would be required. 
It is likely that the majority would live in Riverton and Lander. The 
Project is projected to provide an economic benefit through a variety 
of taxes paid to Federal, State, and local governments to include 
employee income taxes, severance taxes, property taxes, and sales 
taxes.
    The Project is in conformance with the Lander RMP/Final EIS and 
ROD, 1987. During the preparation of the EIS, interim exploration and 
development will be subject to development guidelines and decisions 
made in applicable NEPA documents, including the Lander RMP and any 
subsequent revisions. The EIS will analyze the environmental 
consequences of implementing the Project as proposed and alternatives, 
including a No Action Alternative. Other alternatives that may be 
considered in detail could include, for example, reclamation schedule 
adjustments, or perhaps a different pace of development. The Project 
would not impair lands with wilderness characteristics.
    The purpose of the public scoping process is to determine relevant 
issues that will influence the scope of the environmental analysis, 
including alternatives, and guide the process for developing the EIS. 
At present, the BLM has identified the following preliminary issues: 
air resources, water resources, wildlife and special status species, 
vegetative resources, grazing, concerns about risks from selenium, 
heavy metals and uranium, and long-term post-closure management.
    The BLM will utilize and coordinate the NEPA commenting process to 
help fulfill the public involvement process under Section 106 of the 
National Historic Preservation Act (16 U.S.C. 470f) as provided for in 
36 CFR 800.2(d)(3). Native American tribal consultations will be 
conducted in accordance with policy, and tribal concerns will be given 
due consideration, including impacts on Indian trust assets. Federal, 
State, and local agencies, along with other stakeholders who may be 
interested in or affected by the BLM's decision on this project, are 
invited to participate in the scoping process and, if eligible, may 
request or be requested by the BLM to participate as a cooperating 
agency. Before including your address, phone number, e-mail address, or 
other personal identifying information in your comment, you should be 
aware that your entire comment--including your personal identifying 
information--may be made publicly available at any time. While you can 
ask us in your comment to withhold your personal identifying 
information from public review, we cannot guarantee that we will be 
able to do so.

    Authority:  40 CFR 1501.7.

Donald A. Simpson,
State Director.
[FR Doc. 2011-21563 Filed 8-22-11; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4310-22-P