Columbia National Wildlife Refuge, Adams and Grant Counties, WA; Draft Comprehensive Conservation Plan and Environmental Assessment, 45600-45602 [2011-19200]

Download as PDF 45600 Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 146 / Friday, July 29, 2011 / Notices Section B. Authority Superseded This Order of Succession supersedes the Order of Succession for the General Counsel published on December 1, 2009 (74 FR 62805). Authority: Section 7(d), Department of Housing and Urban Development Act, 42 U.S.C. 3535(d). Dated: July 21, 2011. Helen R. Kanovsky, General Counsel. [FR Doc. 2011–19299 Filed 7–28–11; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4210–67–P DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT [Docket No. FR–5541–D–02] Order of Succession for the Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control, HUD. ACTION: Notice of Order of Succession. AGENCY: In this notice, the Director of the Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control for the Department of Housing and Urban Development designates the Order of Succession for the Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control. This Order of Succession supersedes any previous Order of Succession published for the Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control. DATES: Effective Date: July 15, 2011. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Matthew Ammon, Deputy Director, Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control, Department of Housing and Urban Development, 451 7th Street, SW., Room 8236, Washington, DC 20410, telephone number 202–402–4337 (this is not a toll-free number). Persons with hearing- or speech-impairments may access this number through TTY by calling the toll-free Federal Relay Service at 1–800–877–8339. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Director of the Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control for the Department of Housing and Urban Development is issuing this Order of Succession of officials authorized to perform the functions and duties of the Office of Healthy Homes and Lead mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES SUMMARY: VerDate Mar<15>2010 16:17 Jul 28, 2011 Jkt 223001 Hazard Control when, by reason of absence, disability, or vacancy in office, the Director is not available to exercise the powers or perform the duties of the office. This Order of Succession is subject to the provisions of the Federal Vacancies Reform Act of 1998 (5 U.S.C. 3345–3349d). This publication supersedes any previous Order of Succession published by the Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control. Accordingly, the Director designates the following Order of Succession. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Section A. Order of Succession These officials shall perform the functions and duties of the office in the order specified herein, and no official shall serve unless all the other officials, whose position titles precede his/hers in this order, are unable to act by reason of absence, disability, or vacancy in office. SUMMARY: Subject to the provisions of the Federal Vacancies Reform Act of 1998, during any period when, by reason of absence, disability, or vacancy in office, the Director of the Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control for the Department of Housing and Urban Development is not available to exercise the powers or perform the duties of the Director, the following officials within the Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control are hereby designated to exercise the powers and perform the duties of the Office: (1) Deputy Director; (2) Director, Programs Division; (3) Director, Grants Services Division; (4) Director, Policy and Standards Division; (5) Director, Regional Management and Technical Services Division; and (6) Director, Lead Programs Enforcement Division. These officials shall perform the functions and duties of the office in the order specified herein, and no official shall serve unless all the other officials, whose position titles precede his/hers in this order, are unable to act by reason of absence, disability, or vacancy in office. Fish and Wildlife Service [FWS–R1–R–2011–N088; 1265–0000–10137– S3] Columbia National Wildlife Refuge, Adams and Grant Counties, WA; Draft Comprehensive Conservation Plan and Environmental Assessment Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of availability; request for comments. AGENCY: We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), announce the availability of our draft comprehensive conservation plan and environmental assessment (Draft CCP/EA) for the Columbia National Wildlife Refuge (Refuge) for public review and comment. The Draft CCP/EA describes our proposal and alternatives for managing the Refuge for the next 15 years. To ensure consideration, please send your written comments by August 29, 2011. ADDRESSES: You may download a copy of the Draft CCP/EA from our Web site: http://www.fws.gov/columbia/. You may submit comments on the Draft CCP/EA or request a copy of it on CD–ROM by any of the following methods. A limited number of printed copies are also available. E-mail: mcriver@fws.gov. Include ‘‘Columbia Draft CCP/EA’’ in the subject line of the message. Fax: Attn: Kelly Chase, (509) 546– 8303. U.S. Mail: Kelly Chase, Refuge Manager, Columbia National Wildlife Refuge, 64 Maple Street, Burbank, WA 99323. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Dan Haas, (509) 546–8333 (phone); or daniel_haas@fws.gov (e-mail). SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: DATES: Section B. Authority Superseded Introduction This Order of Succession supersedes any previous Order of Succession published for the Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control. With this notice, we continue the CCP process for the Refuge. The Service began this process by publishing a notice of intent in the Federal Register (74 FR 25576) on May 28, 2009. The Refuge is located in the high desert of central Washington. It encompasses 29,656 acres of grassland, shrub-steppe, lake, and wetland habitats. The Refuge was established in 1944, in conjunction with the Columbia Basin Irrigation Project (CBIP), and has been actively managed since 1955. The Refuge’s primary purposes are as a refuge and breeding ground for Authority: Section 7(d), Department of Housing and Urban Development Act, 42 U.S.C. 3535(d). Dated: July 15, 2011. Jon L. Gant, Director. [FR Doc. 2011–19277 Filed 7–28–11; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4210–67–P PO 00000 Frm 00097 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 E:\FR\FM\29JYN1.SGM 29JYN1 Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 146 / Friday, July 29, 2011 / Notices migratory birds and other wildlife, and for use as an inviolate sanctuary, or for any other management purpose, for migratory birds. The Refuge was created as a breeding ground for migratory birds; however, it is primarily an important stopover during migration. Background The CCP Process The National Wildlife Refuge System Administration Act of 1966 (16 U.S.C. 668dd–668ee), (Refuge Administration Act), as amended by the National Wildlife Refuge System Improvement Act of 1997, requires us to develop a CCP for each national wildlife refuge. The purpose for developing a CCP is to provide refuge managers with a 15-year plan for achieving refuge purposes and contributing toward the mission of the National Wildlife Refuge System, consistent with sound principles of fish and wildlife management, conservation, legal mandates, and our policies. In addition to outlining broad management direction on conserving wildlife and their habitats, CCPs identify wildlifedependent recreational opportunities that are compatible with a refuge’s purposes, and available to the public, including opportunities for hunting, fishing, wildlife observation and photography, and environmental education and interpretation. We will review and update the CCP at least every 15 years in accordance with the Refuge Administration Act. mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Public Outreach The Service began the public scoping phase of the CCP planning process by publishing a notice of intent in the Federal Register (74 FR 25576) on May 28, 2009, announcing our intention to complete a CCP/EA for the Refuge, inviting the public to a public open house meeting, and requesting public comments. Simultaneously, we distributed Planning Update 1 to our mailing list, announcing the beginning of the CCP planning process, requesting comments on Refuge management issues, and inviting the public to attend a public open house meeting. The public meeting was held June 16, 2009, in Othello, Washington. In February 2011 we distributed Planning Update 2. The update included a summary of the comments we received, and our draft management alternatives, goals, and objectives. The public comments we received throughout the planning process were considered during development of the Draft CCP/EA. VerDate Mar<15>2010 16:17 Jul 28, 2011 Jkt 223001 45601 Draft CCP Alternatives We Are Considering provided, and environmental education programs are limited and sporadic. During the public scoping process we identified a number of issues in Planning Update 1, and in the comments we received from the public, government agencies, and Tribes. To address these issues, we developed and evaluated three alternatives for managing the Refuge. A full description of each alternative is in the Draft CCP/ EA. All of the alternatives will include actions to control invasive species, develop or improve partnerships, continue coordination with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, develop volunteer opportunities, and make restoration of habitats a top priority. A brief summary of each alternative follows. Alternative 2 Under Alternative 2, Refuge management actions would be similar to Alternative 1, with a number of improvements. Approximately 175 acres of emergent wetlands in Marsh Unit III would be converted to riparian habitat. The Crab Creek channel would be restored. Specialized habitats (e.g., rock outcroppings) would be managed. Farming would continue using lowimpact techniques. Management of State and Federal species of concern would be emphasized. Visitor use would focus on compatible wildlife observation, photography, and interpretation. The Sandhill Crane Festival would remain a priority. Camping, horseback riding, and bicycling uses may change, or be restricted or eliminated, to enhance various habitats. Additional facilities would be developed, including seasonal photography blinds and an ADAcompliant fishing area and hunting blind. Compatible waterfowl hunting would continue; however, the permanent blinds would be removed (excluding the ADA-compliant blinds), and the lottery would be eliminated. Morgan Lake Road would be closed to overnight travel. Interpretive and educational programs would be limited; however, numerous Refuge brochures would be developed to enhance recreational use of the Refuge. Alternative 1 Alternative 1 is our no action alternative; under it we would continue current management programs. Refuge lands would continue to be managed using a mix of natural processes and habitat maintenance activities. For example, we allow many wetland areas to follow natural succession; however, we conduct noxious weed control, prescribed fire, and other maintenance actions within them. Several moist soil management areas also require water level manipulation, dike maintenance, extensive soil preparation, plantings, and other treatments. Several specialized habitats, such as rock outcroppings and alkali wetlands, are not actively managed. A cooperative farming program is conducted on the Refuge that provides food sources for migratory birds and other wildlife. Waterfowl habitat is actively managed. Management for State or Federal species of concern, such as the Washington ground squirrel, is limited. The Refuge’s annual Sandhill Crane Festival attracts hundreds of people from throughout the Northwest and the rest of the United States. Other compatible public uses include hunting, fishing, wildlife photography and observation, and environmental education and interpretation; however, facilities to accommodate these activities are limited. The Refuge stocks sport fish; however, it lacks a fishing platform that is compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). The Refuge conducts a hunting lottery for a few waterfowl blinds, and other hunting occurs in compliance with Refuge-specific regulations and law enforcement. A small number of trails are provided for hiking and wildlife viewing. A few interpretive signs are PO 00000 Frm 00098 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Alternative 3 Refuge management actions under Alternative 3 would be much the same as Alternative 2, with a greater emphasis on visitor services. The Soda Lake Campground would be converted to day-use facilities, and the area around the Bluebird Campground would be available by permit, as a day-use educational site. To promote hunting and fishing opportunities, ADAcompliant facilities would be developed. Compatible waterfowl and big game hunting opportunities would be expanded by opening new areas, and implementing additional youth hunt days, areas, and seasons. The waterfowl blinds and hunting lottery would be retained. Horseback riding and bicycling would continue. Morgan Lake Road would remain open for 24-hour use. A new hiking and interpretive trail would be developed within the Drumheller Channel National Natural Landmark. Seasonal and permanent wildlife observation blinds would be provided. New interpretive and educational programs would be developed, and new brochures to aid Refuge visitors would E:\FR\FM\29JYN1.SGM 29JYN1 45602 Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 146 / Friday, July 29, 2011 / Notices be developed. The Sandhill Crane Festival would remain a priority. Fish stocking would continue in some lakes; however, to support northern leopard frog recovery, we would discontinue fish stocking in lakes that have the highest likelihood of the species recovery success, as determined by an interdisciplinary team of experts. Public Availability of Documents We encourage you to review and comment on the proposals we have developed in the Draft CCP/EA. The Draft CCP/EA is available on our Web site or by request from the Refuge (see ADDRESSES). Next Steps After this comment period ends, we will analyze the comments and address them in the final CCP and decision document. Public Availability of Comments Before including your address, phone number, e-mail address, or other personal identifying information in your comment, you should be aware that your entire comment—including your personal identifying information—may be made publicly available at any time. While you can ask us in your comment to withhold your personal identifying information from public review, we cannot guarantee that we will be able to do so. Dated: May 20, 2011. Richard Hannan, Acting Regional Director, Region 1, Portland, Oregon. [FR Doc. 2011–19200 Filed 7–28–11; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4310–55–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR [FWS–R8–ES–2011–N144; 81440–1113– 0000–F3] Proposed Safe Harbor Agreement for California Red-Legged Frog, at Swallow Creek Ranch, San Luis Obispo County, CA Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of availability; receipt of permit application. mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES AGENCY: We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), have received, from Swallow Creek Ranch (Applicant), an application for an enhancement of survival permit for the Federally threatened California redlegged frog (Rana draytonii), under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as VerDate Mar<15>2010 16:17 Jul 28, 2011 Jkt 223001 Availability of Documents You may obtain copies of the documents for review by using one of the methods in ADDRESSES, or by contacting the individual named in the FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT section. You also may make an appointment to view the documents at the Ventura Fish and Wildlife Office (see ADDRESSES) during normal business hours. Background Fish and Wildlife Service SUMMARY: amended (Act). This permit application includes a proposed Safe Harbor Agreement (Agreement) between the Applicant and the Service. The Agreement and permit application are available for public comment. DATES: To ensure we are able to consider your comments, please send them to us by August 29, 2011. ADDRESSES: The documents are available on our Web site: http:// www.fws.gov/ventura. A limited number of printed copies are available by request. You may request the documents or submit comments by any of the following methods. • E-mail: fw8SHA_swallowcreekranch@fws.gov. Include ‘‘Swallow Creek Ranch SHA’’ in the subject line of the message. • U.S. Mail: Field Supervisor; U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; Ventura Fish and Wildlife Office; 2493 Portola Road, Suite B; Ventura, CA 93003. • Fax: Attn: Field Supervisor, (805) 644–3958. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Eric Morrissette, Safe Harbor Coordinator, Ventura Fish and Wildlife Office at the address above or by telephone at (805) 644–1766. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Under a Safe Harbor Agreement, participating landowners voluntarily undertake management activities on their property to enhance, restore, or maintain habitat benefiting species listed under the Act (16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq.). Safe Harbor Agreements, and the subsequent permits that are issued under section 10(a)(1)(A) of the Act, encourage private and other non-Federal property owners to implement conservation efforts for listed species by assuring property owners that they will not be subjected to increased land use restrictions as a result of efforts to attract or increase the numbers or distribution of a listed species on their property. Application requirements and issuance criteria for permits through Safe Harbor Agreements are found in 50 CFR 17.32(c). PO 00000 Frm 00099 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 We have worked with the Applicant to develop this proposed Agreement for the conservation of the California redlegged frog on the property subject to the Agreement (Enrolled Property), which is owned and managed by the Applicant. The Enrolled Property is Swallow Creek Ranch in San Luis Obispo County, California. Within the 620 acres of land comprising the Enrolled Property, habitat for the California red-legged frog will be restored, enhanced, and managed under a written agreement between the Applicant and Service. We expect that the activities proposed in the Agreement will result in an increase in suitable habitat for this species and provide for its increase in number and its expansion into additional areas that are currently not occupied, thus resulting in a net conservation benefit for the species. This Agreement provides for the restoration, enhancement, and management of aquatic, riparian, and upland habitat suitable for the California red-legged frog on the Enrolled Property. The proposed duration of the Agreement is 30 years, and the proposed term of the enhancement of survival permit is 30 years. The Agreement fully describes the proposed management activities to be undertaken by the Applicant and the net conservation benefits expected to be gained for the California red-legged frog. Upon approval of this Agreement and satisfactory completion of all other applicable legal requirements, and consistent with the Service’s Safe Harbor Policy published in the Federal Register on June 17, 1999 (64 FR 32717), the Service would issue a permit to the Applicant authorizing take of the California red-legged frog incidental to the implementation of the management activities specified in the Agreement; incidental to other lawful uses of the Enrolled Property, including normal, routine land management activities; and incidental to the return to preAgreement conditions (baseline). Management activities included in the Agreement will provide for the restoration, enhancement, and management of native riparian habitats within the Enrolled Property. The objective of such activities is to enhance the population of California red-legged frogs by increasing the quality and quantity of suitable habitat on the Enrolled Property. Take of California red-legged frogs incidental to the aforementioned activities is unlikely; however, it is possible that in the course of such activities or other lawful activities on the Enrolled Property, the Applicant could incidentally take California red-legged frog, thereby E:\FR\FM\29JYN1.SGM 29JYN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 76, Number 146 (Friday, July 29, 2011)]
[Notices]
[Pages 45600-45602]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2011-19200]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

Fish and Wildlife Service

[FWS-R1-R-2011-N088; 1265-0000-10137-S3]


Columbia National Wildlife Refuge, Adams and Grant Counties, WA; 
Draft Comprehensive Conservation Plan and Environmental Assessment

AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice of availability; request for comments.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), announce the 
availability of our draft comprehensive conservation plan and 
environmental assessment (Draft CCP/EA) for the Columbia National 
Wildlife Refuge (Refuge) for public review and comment. The Draft CCP/
EA describes our proposal and alternatives for managing the Refuge for 
the next 15 years.

DATES: To ensure consideration, please send your written comments by 
August 29, 2011.

ADDRESSES: You may download a copy of the Draft CCP/EA from our Web 
site: http://www.fws.gov/columbia/. You may submit comments on the 
Draft CCP/EA or request a copy of it on CD-ROM by any of the following 
methods. A limited number of printed copies are also available.
    E-mail: mcriver@fws.gov. Include ``Columbia Draft CCP/EA'' in the 
subject line of the message.
    Fax: Attn: Kelly Chase, (509) 546-8303.
    U.S. Mail: Kelly Chase, Refuge Manager, Columbia National Wildlife 
Refuge, 64 Maple Street, Burbank, WA 99323.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Dan Haas, (509) 546-8333 (phone); or 
daniel_haas@fws.gov (e-mail).

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

Introduction

    With this notice, we continue the CCP process for the Refuge. The 
Service began this process by publishing a notice of intent in the 
Federal Register (74 FR 25576) on May 28, 2009.
    The Refuge is located in the high desert of central Washington. It 
encompasses 29,656 acres of grassland, shrub-steppe, lake, and wetland 
habitats. The Refuge was established in 1944, in conjunction with the 
Columbia Basin Irrigation Project (CBIP), and has been actively managed 
since 1955. The Refuge's primary purposes are as a refuge and breeding 
ground for

[[Page 45601]]

migratory birds and other wildlife, and for use as an inviolate 
sanctuary, or for any other management purpose, for migratory birds. 
The Refuge was created as a breeding ground for migratory birds; 
however, it is primarily an important stopover during migration.

Background

The CCP Process

    The National Wildlife Refuge System Administration Act of 1966 (16 
U.S.C. 668dd-668ee), (Refuge Administration Act), as amended by the 
National Wildlife Refuge System Improvement Act of 1997, requires us to 
develop a CCP for each national wildlife refuge. The purpose for 
developing a CCP is to provide refuge managers with a 15-year plan for 
achieving refuge purposes and contributing toward the mission of the 
National Wildlife Refuge System, consistent with sound principles of 
fish and wildlife management, conservation, legal mandates, and our 
policies. In addition to outlining broad management direction on 
conserving wildlife and their habitats, CCPs identify wildlife-
dependent recreational opportunities that are compatible with a 
refuge's purposes, and available to the public, including opportunities 
for hunting, fishing, wildlife observation and photography, and 
environmental education and interpretation. We will review and update 
the CCP at least every 15 years in accordance with the Refuge 
Administration Act.

Public Outreach

    The Service began the public scoping phase of the CCP planning 
process by publishing a notice of intent in the Federal Register (74 FR 
25576) on May 28, 2009, announcing our intention to complete a CCP/EA 
for the Refuge, inviting the public to a public open house meeting, and 
requesting public comments. Simultaneously, we distributed Planning 
Update 1 to our mailing list, announcing the beginning of the CCP 
planning process, requesting comments on Refuge management issues, and 
inviting the public to attend a public open house meeting. The public 
meeting was held June 16, 2009, in Othello, Washington.
    In February 2011 we distributed Planning Update 2. The update 
included a summary of the comments we received, and our draft 
management alternatives, goals, and objectives. The public comments we 
received throughout the planning process were considered during 
development of the Draft CCP/EA.

Draft CCP Alternatives We Are Considering

    During the public scoping process we identified a number of issues 
in Planning Update 1, and in the comments we received from the public, 
government agencies, and Tribes. To address these issues, we developed 
and evaluated three alternatives for managing the Refuge. A full 
description of each alternative is in the Draft CCP/EA. All of the 
alternatives will include actions to control invasive species, develop 
or improve partnerships, continue coordination with the Washington 
Department of Fish and Wildlife, develop volunteer opportunities, and 
make restoration of habitats a top priority. A brief summary of each 
alternative follows.

Alternative 1

    Alternative 1 is our no action alternative; under it we would 
continue current management programs. Refuge lands would continue to be 
managed using a mix of natural processes and habitat maintenance 
activities. For example, we allow many wetland areas to follow natural 
succession; however, we conduct noxious weed control, prescribed fire, 
and other maintenance actions within them. Several moist soil 
management areas also require water level manipulation, dike 
maintenance, extensive soil preparation, plantings, and other 
treatments. Several specialized habitats, such as rock outcroppings and 
alkali wetlands, are not actively managed. A cooperative farming 
program is conducted on the Refuge that provides food sources for 
migratory birds and other wildlife. Waterfowl habitat is actively 
managed. Management for State or Federal species of concern, such as 
the Washington ground squirrel, is limited.
    The Refuge's annual Sandhill Crane Festival attracts hundreds of 
people from throughout the Northwest and the rest of the United States. 
Other compatible public uses include hunting, fishing, wildlife 
photography and observation, and environmental education and 
interpretation; however, facilities to accommodate these activities are 
limited. The Refuge stocks sport fish; however, it lacks a fishing 
platform that is compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act 
(ADA). The Refuge conducts a hunting lottery for a few waterfowl 
blinds, and other hunting occurs in compliance with Refuge-specific 
regulations and law enforcement. A small number of trails are provided 
for hiking and wildlife viewing. A few interpretive signs are provided, 
and environmental education programs are limited and sporadic.

Alternative 2

    Under Alternative 2, Refuge management actions would be similar to 
Alternative 1, with a number of improvements. Approximately 175 acres 
of emergent wetlands in Marsh Unit III would be converted to riparian 
habitat. The Crab Creek channel would be restored. Specialized habitats 
(e.g., rock outcroppings) would be managed. Farming would continue 
using low-impact techniques. Management of State and Federal species of 
concern would be emphasized.
    Visitor use would focus on compatible wildlife observation, 
photography, and interpretation. The Sandhill Crane Festival would 
remain a priority. Camping, horseback riding, and bicycling uses may 
change, or be restricted or eliminated, to enhance various habitats. 
Additional facilities would be developed, including seasonal 
photography blinds and an ADA-compliant fishing area and hunting blind. 
Compatible waterfowl hunting would continue; however, the permanent 
blinds would be removed (excluding the ADA-compliant blinds), and the 
lottery would be eliminated. Morgan Lake Road would be closed to 
overnight travel. Interpretive and educational programs would be 
limited; however, numerous Refuge brochures would be developed to 
enhance recreational use of the Refuge.

Alternative 3

    Refuge management actions under Alternative 3 would be much the 
same as Alternative 2, with a greater emphasis on visitor services. The 
Soda Lake Campground would be converted to day-use facilities, and the 
area around the Bluebird Campground would be available by permit, as a 
day-use educational site. To promote hunting and fishing opportunities, 
ADA-compliant facilities would be developed. Compatible waterfowl and 
big game hunting opportunities would be expanded by opening new areas, 
and implementing additional youth hunt days, areas, and seasons. The 
waterfowl blinds and hunting lottery would be retained. Horseback 
riding and bicycling would continue. Morgan Lake Road would remain open 
for 24-hour use. A new hiking and interpretive trail would be developed 
within the Drumheller Channel National Natural Landmark. Seasonal and 
permanent wildlife observation blinds would be provided. New 
interpretive and educational programs would be developed, and new 
brochures to aid Refuge visitors would

[[Page 45602]]

be developed. The Sandhill Crane Festival would remain a priority. Fish 
stocking would continue in some lakes; however, to support northern 
leopard frog recovery, we would discontinue fish stocking in lakes that 
have the highest likelihood of the species recovery success, as 
determined by an interdisciplinary team of experts.

Public Availability of Documents

    We encourage you to review and comment on the proposals we have 
developed in the Draft CCP/EA. The Draft CCP/EA is available on our Web 
site or by request from the Refuge (see ADDRESSES).

Next Steps

    After this comment period ends, we will analyze the comments and 
address them in the final CCP and decision document.

Public Availability of Comments

    Before including your address, phone number, e-mail address, or 
other personal identifying information in your comment, you should be 
aware that your entire comment--including your personal identifying 
information--may be made publicly available at any time. While you can 
ask us in your comment to withhold your personal identifying 
information from public review, we cannot guarantee that we will be 
able to do so.

    Dated: May 20, 2011.
Richard Hannan,
Acting Regional Director, Region 1, Portland, Oregon.
[FR Doc. 2011-19200 Filed 7-28-11; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4310-55-P