Conboy Lake and Toppenish National Wildlife Refuges, WA; Comprehensive Conservation Plan and Environmental Assessment, 41286-41287 [2011-17424]

Download as PDF 41286 Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 134 / Wednesday, July 13, 2011 / Notices Scoping: Preliminary Issues, Concerns, and Opportunities We have identified preliminary issues, concerns, and opportunities for the refuges that we may address in the CCP. We have briefly summarized these issues below. During public scoping, we may identify additional issues. Cold Springs NWR and McKay Creek NWR Public Comments Opportunities for the public to provide input will be announced in press releases, planning updates, and on our Web sites at http://www.fws.gov/ mcriver, http://www.fws.gov/ coldsprings/management.html, and http://www.fws.gov/mckaycreek/ management.html. There will be additional opportunities to provide public input throughout the CCP process. mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Public Availability of Comments Before including your address, phone number, e-mail address, or other personal identifying information in your comment, you should be aware that your entire comment—including your personal identifying information—may be made publicly available at any time. While you can ask us in your comment to withhold your personal identifying information from public review, we cannot guarantee that we will be able to do so. Dated: June 17, 2011. Richard R. Hannan, Acting Regional Director, Region 1, Portland, Oregon. BILLING CODE 4310–55–P VerDate Mar<15>2010 17:36 Jul 12, 2011 Jkt 223001 Fish and Wildlife Service [FWS–R1–R–2011–N081; 1265–0000–10137– S3] Conboy Lake and Toppenish National Wildlife Refuges, WA; Comprehensive Conservation Plan and Environmental Assessment Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of intent; request for comments. AGENCY: The decline of waterfowl use at the refuges; management of wetland habitats to best benefit waterfowl and other wildlife species; management for long-term viability of riparian habitat; providing benefits to shrub-steppe or grassland obligate species; management of non-wildlife-oriented recreational activities given the increasing visitation at the refuges; increasing the understanding of the natural and cultural resources of the refuges; control of invasive and non-native species; determining if big game hunting is a viable public use at either or both refuges; effective law enforcement; the impacts of climate change and increasing development; monitoring and control of mosquitoes and related human health hazards. [FR Doc. 2011–17423 Filed 7–12–11; 8:45 am] DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), intend to prepare a comprehensive conservation plan (CCP) and environmental assessment (EA) for the Conboy Lake National Wildlife Refuge (refuge, NWR), located in Klickitat County, Washington, and the Toppenish National Wildlife Refuge, located in Yakima County, Washington. We provide this notice in compliance with our CCP policy to advise other Federal and State agencies, Tribes, and the public of our intentions and to obtain suggestions and information on the scope of issues to consider in the planning process. DATES: To ensure consideration, please send your written comments by August 12, 2011. ADDRESSES: Send your comments or requests for more information by any of the following methods: • E-mail: mcriver@fws.gov. Include ‘‘Conboy Lake and Toppenish NWRs CCP’’ in the subject line of the message. • Fax: Attn: Dan Haas, Planning Team Leader, (509) 546–8303. • U.S. Mail: Mid-Columbia River National Wildlife Refuge Complex, Conboy Lake and Toppenish NWRs CCP, 64 Maple Street, Burbank, WA 99323. • In-Person Drop-off: You may drop off comments during regular business hours at the above address. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Shannon Ludwig, Refuge Manager, Conboy Lake and Toppenish National Wildlife Refuges, (509) 865–2405 (phone); Shannon_ludwig@fws.gov (email). SUMMARY: SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Introduction With this notice, we initiate our process for developing a CCP for Conboy Lake NWR, in Klickitat County, Washington, and Toppenish NWR in Yakima County, Washington. This notice complies with our CCP policy to (1) Advise other Federal and State PO 00000 Frm 00101 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 agencies, Tribes, and the public of our intention to conduct detailed planning on these refuges and (2) obtain suggestions and information on the scope of issues to consider in the environmental document and during development of the CCP. Background The CCP Process The National Wildlife Refuge System Administration Act of 1966 (16 U.S.C. 668dd-668ee) (Refuge Administration Act), as amended by the National Wildlife Refuge System Improvement Act of 1997, requires us to develop a CCP for each national wildlife refuge. The purpose for developing a CCP is to provide refuge managers with a 15-year plan for achieving refuge purposes and contributing toward the mission of the National Wildlife Refuge System, consistent with sound principles of fish and wildlife management, conservation, legal mandates, and our policies. In addition to outlining broad management direction on conserving wildlife and their habitats, CCPs identify compatible wildlife-dependent recreational opportunities available to the public, including opportunities for hunting, fishing, wildlife observation and photography, and environmental education and interpretation. We will review and update the CCP at least every 15 years in accordance with the Refuge Administration Act. Each unit of the National Wildlife Refuge System was established for specific purposes. We use these purposes as the foundation for developing and prioritizing the management goals and objectives for each refuge within the National Wildlife Refuge System mission, and to determine how the public can use each refuge. The planning process is a way for us and the public to evaluate management goals and objectives that will ensure the best possible approach to wildlife, plant, and habitat conservation, while providing for wildlife-dependent recreation opportunities that are compatible with each refuge’s establishing purposes and the mission of the National Wildlife Refuge System. Our CCP process provides participation opportunities for Tribal, State, and local governments; agencies; organizations; and the public. During the CCP planning process, many elements of refuge management will be considered, including wildlife and habitat protection and management and management of visitor services programs. Public input during the planning process is essential. The CCP E:\FR\FM\13JYN1.SGM 13JYN1 Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 134 / Wednesday, July 13, 2011 / Notices will describe the refuge purposes and desired conditions for the refuge and the long-term conservation goals, objectives and strategies for fulfilling the purposes and achieving those conditions. At this time we encourage input in the form of issues, concerns, ideas, and suggestions for the future management of Conboy Lake and Toppenish NWRs. We will conduct the environmental review of this project and develop an EA in accordance with the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, as amended (NEPA) (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.); NEPA regulations (40 CFR Parts 1500–1508); other appropriate Federal laws and regulations; and our policies and procedures for compliance with those laws and regulations. Refuge Overviews mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Conboy Lake NWR Conboy Lake NWR covers approximately 9,100 acres in the transition zone between arid eastern Washington and wet western Washington, near the southern base of Mt. Adams. The refuge is comprised of a wide variety of habitat types, from the lake itself to wet meadows to Ponderosa pine and oak forests. Because of its varied habitats and its location in the transition zone, the refuge supports an abundance of wildlife species. Conboy Lake NWR was established ‘‘for use as an inviolate sanctuary, or for any other management purpose, for migratory birds’’ (Migratory Bird Conservation Act; 16 U.S.C. 715d) that is ‘‘suitable for— (1) Incidental fish and wildlife-oriented recreational development, (2) the protection of natural resources, [and/or] (3) the conservation of endangered species or threatened species’’ (Refuge Recreation Act; 16 U.S.C. 460k–1), in order ‘‘to conserve (A) fish or wildlife which are listed as endangered species or threatened species * * * or (B) plants’’ (16 U.S.C. 1534, Endangered Species Act of 1973). The refuge also fills an important role in the management of mallards, northern pintails, and tundra swans during migration periods, and is both a migratory stopover area and breeding site for the Pacific Coast population of the greater Sandhill crane. It is located along the Pacific Flyway and has become a particularly important stopover and wintering ground for migratory birds and waterfowl. Toppenish NWR Toppenish NWR was also established ‘‘for use as an inviolate sanctuary, or for any other management purpose, for migratory birds’’ (Migratory Bird VerDate Mar<15>2010 17:36 Jul 12, 2011 Jkt 223001 Conservation Act; 16 U.S.C. 715d) that is ‘‘suitable for— (1) Incidental fish and wildlife-oriented recreational development, (2) the protection of natural resources, [and/or] (3) the conservation of endangered species or threatened species’’ (Refuge Recreation Act; 16 U.S.C. 460k–1), ‘‘for the development, advancement, management, conservation, and protection of fish and wildlife resources’’ (Fish and Wildlife Act of 1956; 16 U.S.C. 742f(a)(4)), in order ‘‘to conserve (A) fish or wildlife which are listed as endangered species or threatened species * * * or (B) plants’’ (16 U.S.C. 1534; Endangered Species Act of 1973). Located in arid eastern Washington, approximately 40 miles north of the Oregon border, most of the refuge’s 2,000 acres are nonetheless focused around water. An extensive system of managed and unmanaged wetlands fills an important role in the management of mallards, northern pintails, and lesser Canada geese populations during migration and winter periods. It, too, is located along the Pacific Flyway and has become a particularly important stopover and wintering ground for migratory birds and waterfowl. 41287 in press releases, planning updates, and on our websites at http://www.fws.gov/ mcriver, http://www.fws.gov/ conboylake/management.html, and http://www.fws.gov/toppenish/ management.html. There will be additional opportunities to provide public input throughout the CCP process. Public Availability of Comments Before including your address, phone number, e-mail address, or other personal identifying information in your comment, you should be aware that your entire comment—including your personal identifying information—may be made publicly available at any time. While you can ask us in your comment to withhold your personal identifying information from public review, we cannot guarantee that we will be able to do so. Dated: June 9, 2011. Robyn Thorson, Regional Director, Region 1, Portland, Oregon. [FR Doc. 2011–17424 Filed 7–12–11; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4310–55–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Scoping: Preliminary Issues, Concerns, and Opportunities We have identified preliminary issues, concerns, and opportunities that we may address in the CCP. We have briefly summarized these issues below. During public scoping, we may identify additional issues. Fish and Wildlife Service Conboy Lake NWR Land acquisition/exchanges/ conservation agreements; water rights; water management; wet meadow, riparian, and stream habitat management; short-grass management; upland meadow management; forest management; plant species management (e.g., invasive and nonnative plants, rare plants); animal species management (e.g., Oregon spotted frog, sandhill crane, elk); wildlife-dependent use; effective law enforcement; impacts of climate change; staffing. AGENCY: Toppenish NWR Wildlife and habitat management; water rights; wetland management; invasive and nonnative species; rare and listed species recovery; impacts of climate change; contaminants and water quality; wildlife-dependent issues; effective law enforcement; staffing. Public Comments Opportunities for the public to provide further input will be announced PO 00000 Frm 00102 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 [FWS–R4–ES–2011–N124; 40120–1112– 0000–F2] Incidental Take Permits and Joint Environmental Assessment for Four Single Family Residences in Escambia County, FL Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. Under the Endangered Species Act (Act), we, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, announce the receipt and availability of four proposed habitat conservation plans (HCPs) and accompanying documents for four independently proposed developments. The take would involve the Federally endangered Perdido Key beach mouse (Peromyscus polionotus trissyllepsis) on Perdido Key in Escambia County, Florida. Each HCP analyzes the take incidental to construction and occupation of four single-family residences (Projects). We invite public comments on these documents. DATES: We must receive any written comments at our Regional Office (see ADDRESSES) on or before September 12, 2011. ADDRESSES: Documents are available for public inspection by appointment during normal business hours at the SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\13JYN1.SGM 13JYN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 76, Number 134 (Wednesday, July 13, 2011)]
[Notices]
[Pages 41286-41287]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2011-17424]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

Fish and Wildlife Service

[FWS-R1-R-2011-N081; 1265-0000-10137-S3]


Conboy Lake and Toppenish National Wildlife Refuges, WA; 
Comprehensive Conservation Plan and Environmental Assessment

AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice of intent; request for comments.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), intend to 
prepare a comprehensive conservation plan (CCP) and environmental 
assessment (EA) for the Conboy Lake National Wildlife Refuge (refuge, 
NWR), located in Klickitat County, Washington, and the Toppenish 
National Wildlife Refuge, located in Yakima County, Washington. We 
provide this notice in compliance with our CCP policy to advise other 
Federal and State agencies, Tribes, and the public of our intentions 
and to obtain suggestions and information on the scope of issues to 
consider in the planning process.

DATES: To ensure consideration, please send your written comments by 
August 12, 2011.

ADDRESSES: Send your comments or requests for more information by any 
of the following methods:
     E-mail: mcriver@fws.gov. Include ``Conboy Lake and 
Toppenish NWRs CCP'' in the subject line of the message.
     Fax: Attn: Dan Haas, Planning Team Leader, (509) 546-8303.
     U.S. Mail: Mid-Columbia River National Wildlife Refuge 
Complex, Conboy Lake and Toppenish NWRs CCP, 64 Maple Street, Burbank, 
WA 99323.
     In-Person Drop-off: You may drop off comments during 
regular business hours at the above address.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Shannon Ludwig, Refuge Manager, Conboy 
Lake and Toppenish National Wildlife Refuges, (509) 865-2405 (phone); 
Shannon_ludwig@fws.gov (e-mail).

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: 

Introduction

    With this notice, we initiate our process for developing a CCP for 
Conboy Lake NWR, in Klickitat County, Washington, and Toppenish NWR in 
Yakima County, Washington. This notice complies with our CCP policy to 
(1) Advise other Federal and State agencies, Tribes, and the public of 
our intention to conduct detailed planning on these refuges and (2) 
obtain suggestions and information on the scope of issues to consider 
in the environmental document and during development of the CCP.

Background

The CCP Process

    The National Wildlife Refuge System Administration Act of 1966 (16 
U.S.C. 668dd-668ee) (Refuge Administration Act), as amended by the 
National Wildlife Refuge System Improvement Act of 1997, requires us to 
develop a CCP for each national wildlife refuge. The purpose for 
developing a CCP is to provide refuge managers with a 15-year plan for 
achieving refuge purposes and contributing toward the mission of the 
National Wildlife Refuge System, consistent with sound principles of 
fish and wildlife management, conservation, legal mandates, and our 
policies. In addition to outlining broad management direction on 
conserving wildlife and their habitats, CCPs identify compatible 
wildlife-dependent recreational opportunities available to the public, 
including opportunities for hunting, fishing, wildlife observation and 
photography, and environmental education and interpretation. We will 
review and update the CCP at least every 15 years in accordance with 
the Refuge Administration Act.
    Each unit of the National Wildlife Refuge System was established 
for specific purposes. We use these purposes as the foundation for 
developing and prioritizing the management goals and objectives for 
each refuge within the National Wildlife Refuge System mission, and to 
determine how the public can use each refuge. The planning process is a 
way for us and the public to evaluate management goals and objectives 
that will ensure the best possible approach to wildlife, plant, and 
habitat conservation, while providing for wildlife-dependent recreation 
opportunities that are compatible with each refuge's establishing 
purposes and the mission of the National Wildlife Refuge System.
    Our CCP process provides participation opportunities for Tribal, 
State, and local governments; agencies; organizations; and the public. 
During the CCP planning process, many elements of refuge management 
will be considered, including wildlife and habitat protection and 
management and management of visitor services programs. Public input 
during the planning process is essential. The CCP

[[Page 41287]]

will describe the refuge purposes and desired conditions for the refuge 
and the long-term conservation goals, objectives and strategies for 
fulfilling the purposes and achieving those conditions. At this time we 
encourage input in the form of issues, concerns, ideas, and suggestions 
for the future management of Conboy Lake and Toppenish NWRs.
    We will conduct the environmental review of this project and 
develop an EA in accordance with the requirements of the National 
Environmental Policy Act of 1969, as amended (NEPA) (42 U.S.C. 4321 et 
seq.); NEPA regulations (40 CFR Parts 1500-1508); other appropriate 
Federal laws and regulations; and our policies and procedures for 
compliance with those laws and regulations.

Refuge Overviews

Conboy Lake NWR

    Conboy Lake NWR covers approximately 9,100 acres in the transition 
zone between arid eastern Washington and wet western Washington, near 
the southern base of Mt. Adams. The refuge is comprised of a wide 
variety of habitat types, from the lake itself to wet meadows to 
Ponderosa pine and oak forests. Because of its varied habitats and its 
location in the transition zone, the refuge supports an abundance of 
wildlife species.
    Conboy Lake NWR was established ``for use as an inviolate 
sanctuary, or for any other management purpose, for migratory birds'' 
(Migratory Bird Conservation Act; 16 U.S.C. 715d) that is ``suitable 
for-- (1) Incidental fish and wildlife-oriented recreational 
development, (2) the protection of natural resources, [and/or] (3) the 
conservation of endangered species or threatened species'' (Refuge 
Recreation Act; 16 U.S.C. 460k-1), in order ``to conserve (A) fish or 
wildlife which are listed as endangered species or threatened species * 
* * or (B) plants'' (16 U.S.C. 1534, Endangered Species Act of 1973). 
The refuge also fills an important role in the management of mallards, 
northern pintails, and tundra swans during migration periods, and is 
both a migratory stopover area and breeding site for the Pacific Coast 
population of the greater Sandhill crane. It is located along the 
Pacific Flyway and has become a particularly important stopover and 
wintering ground for migratory birds and waterfowl.

Toppenish NWR

    Toppenish NWR was also established ``for use as an inviolate 
sanctuary, or for any other management purpose, for migratory birds'' 
(Migratory Bird Conservation Act; 16 U.S.C. 715d) that is ``suitable 
for-- (1) Incidental fish and wildlife-oriented recreational 
development, (2) the protection of natural resources, [and/or] (3) the 
conservation of endangered species or threatened species'' (Refuge 
Recreation Act; 16 U.S.C. 460k-1), ``for the development, advancement, 
management, conservation, and protection of fish and wildlife 
resources'' (Fish and Wildlife Act of 1956; 16 U.S.C. 742f(a)(4)), in 
order ``to conserve (A) fish or wildlife which are listed as endangered 
species or threatened species * * * or (B) plants'' (16 U.S.C. 1534; 
Endangered Species Act of 1973). Located in arid eastern Washington, 
approximately 40 miles north of the Oregon border, most of the refuge's 
2,000 acres are nonetheless focused around water. An extensive system 
of managed and unmanaged wetlands fills an important role in the 
management of mallards, northern pintails, and lesser Canada geese 
populations during migration and winter periods. It, too, is located 
along the Pacific Flyway and has become a particularly important 
stopover and wintering ground for migratory birds and waterfowl.

Scoping: Preliminary Issues, Concerns, and Opportunities

    We have identified preliminary issues, concerns, and opportunities 
that we may address in the CCP. We have briefly summarized these issues 
below. During public scoping, we may identify additional issues.

Conboy Lake NWR

    Land acquisition/exchanges/conservation agreements; water rights; 
water management; wet meadow, riparian, and stream habitat management; 
short-grass management; upland meadow management; forest management; 
plant species management (e.g., invasive and nonnative plants, rare 
plants); animal species management (e.g., Oregon spotted frog, sandhill 
crane, elk); wildlife-dependent use; effective law enforcement; impacts 
of climate change; staffing.

Toppenish NWR

    Wildlife and habitat management; water rights; wetland management; 
invasive and nonnative species; rare and listed species recovery; 
impacts of climate change; contaminants and water quality; wildlife-
dependent issues; effective law enforcement; staffing.

Public Comments

    Opportunities for the public to provide further input will be 
announced in press releases, planning updates, and on our websites at 
http://www.fws.gov/mcriver, http://www.fws.gov/conboylake/management.html, and http://www.fws.gov/toppenish/management.html. 
There will be additional opportunities to provide public input 
throughout the CCP process.

Public Availability of Comments

    Before including your address, phone number, e-mail address, or 
other personal identifying information in your comment, you should be 
aware that your entire comment--including your personal identifying 
information--may be made publicly available at any time. While you can 
ask us in your comment to withhold your personal identifying 
information from public review, we cannot guarantee that we will be 
able to do so.

    Dated: June 9, 2011.
Robyn Thorson,
Regional Director, Region 1, Portland, Oregon.
[FR Doc. 2011-17424 Filed 7-12-11; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4310-55-P