Special Conditions: Pratt and Whitney Canada Model PW210S Turboshaft Engine, 40594-40596 [2011-17298]

Download as PDF 40594 Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 132 / Monday, July 11, 2011 / Rules and Regulations Repayment Program (VMLRP) authorized under section 1415A of the National Agricultural Research, Extension, and Teaching Policy Act of 1977 (NARETPA), with implementing regulations at 7 CFR part 3431. NIFA organized the regulation as follows: Subparts A through E provide administrative provisions for all competitive and noncompetitive nonformula Federal assistance awards. Subparts F and thereafter apply to specific NIFA programs. NIFA is, to the extent practical, using the following subpart template for each program authority: (1) Applicability of regulations, (2) purpose, (3) definitions (those in addition to or different from § 3430.2), (4) eligibility, (5) project types and priorities, (6) funding restrictions (including indirect costs), and (7) matching requirements. Subparts F and thereafter contain the above seven components in this order. Additional sections may be added for a specific program if there are additional requirements or a need for additional rules for the program (e.g., additional reporting requirements). Through this rulemaking, NIFA is adding subpart O for the administrative provisions that are specific to the Federal assistance awards made under the Sun Grant Program authority. II. Administrative Requirements for the Proposed Rulemaking Executive Order 12866 erowe on DSK5CLS3C1PROD with RULES This action has been determined to be not significant for purposes of Executive Order 12866, and therefore, has not been reviewed by the Office of Management and Budget. This final rule will not create a serious inconsistency or otherwise interfere with an action taken or planned by another agency; nor will it materially alter the budgetary impact of entitlements, grants, user fees, or loan programs; nor will it have an annual effect on the economy of $100 million or more; nor will it adversely affect the economy, a sector of the economy, productivity, competition, jobs, the environment, public health or safety, or State, local, or tribal governments or communities in a material way. Furthermore, it does not raise a novel legal or policy issue arising out of legal mandates, the President’s priorities or principles set forth in the Executive Order. Regulatory Flexibility Act of 1980 This final rule has been reviewed in accordance with the Regulatory Flexibility Act of 1980, as amended by the Small Business Regulatory Enforcement Fairness Act of 1996, 5 VerDate Mar<15>2010 15:08 Jul 08, 2011 Jkt 223001 U.S.C. 601–612. The Department concluded that the rule will not have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small entities. The rule does not involve regulatory and informational requirements regarding businesses, organizations, and governmental jurisdictions subject to regulation. Paperwork Reduction Act (PRA) The Department certifies that this final rule has been assessed in accordance with the requirements of the Paperwork Reduction Act, 44 U.S.C. 3501 et seq. (PRA). The Department concludes that this final rule does not impose any new information requirements; however, the burden estimates will increase for existing approved information collections associated with this rule due to additional applicants. These estimates will be provided to OMB. In addition to the SF–424 form families (i.e., Research and Related and Mandatory), and the SF–425 Federal Financial Report; NIFA has three currently approved OMB information collections associated with this rulemaking: OMB Information Collection No. 0524–0042, NIFA Current Research Information System (CRIS); No. 0524–0041, NIFA Application Review Process; and No. 0524–0026, Assurance of Compliance with the Department of Agriculture Regulations Assuring Civil Rights Compliance and Organizational Information. Executive Order 13175: Consultation and Coordination With Indian Tribal Governments The Department has reviewed this final rule in accordance with Executive Order 13175, and has determined that it does not have ‘‘tribal implications.’’ The final rule does not ‘‘have substantial direct effects on one or more Indian tribes, on the relationship between the Federal Government and Indian tribes, or on the distribution of power and responsibilities between the Federal Government and Indian tribes.’’ Clarity of This Regulation Executive Order 12866 and the President’s Memorandum of June 1, 1998, require each agency to write all rules in plain language. The Department invites comments on how to make this final rule easier to understand. List of Subjects in 7 CFR Part 3430 Administrative practice and procedure, Agricultural Research, Education, Extension, Federal assistance. Accordingly, the interim rule amending 7 CFR part 3430, which was published at 75 FR 70578 on November 18, 2010, is adopted as a final rule without change. Signed at Washington, DC, on July 1, 2011. Chavonda Jacobs-Young, Acting Director, National Institute of Food and Agriculture. [FR Doc. 2011–17350 Filed 7–8–11; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3410–22–P Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance This final regulation applies to the Federal assistance program administered by NIFA under the Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) No. 10.320, Sun Grant Program. DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 1995 and Executive Order 13132 [Docket No. NE131; Special Conditions No. 33–009–SC] The Department has reviewed this final rule in accordance with the requirements of Executive Order No. 13132 and the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 1995, 2 U.S.C. 1501 et seq., and has found no potential or substantial direct effects on the States, on the relationship between the national government and the States, or on the distribution of power and responsibilities among the various levels of government. As there is no Federal mandate contained herein that could result in increased expenditures by State, local, or tribal governments, or by the private sector, the Department has not prepared a budgetary impact statement. Special Conditions: Pratt and Whitney Canada Model PW210S Turboshaft Engine PO 00000 Frm 00002 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 33 Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final special conditions. AGENCY: These special conditions are issued for Pratt and Whitney Canada (PWC) model PW210S engines. The engine model will have a novel or unusual design feature which is a 30minute all engine operating (AEO) power rating. This rating is generally intended to be used for hovering at increased power for search and rescue missions. The applicable airworthiness regulations do not contain adequate or SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\11JYR1.SGM 11JYR1 Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 132 / Monday, July 11, 2011 / Rules and Regulations erowe on DSK5CLS3C1PROD with RULES appropriate safety standards for this design feature. These special conditions contain the added safety standards that the Administrator considers necessary to establish a level of safety equivalent to that established by the existing airworthiness standards. DATES: The effective date of these special conditions is August 10, 2011. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: For technical questions concerning this rule contact Marc Bouthillier, ANE–111, Engine and Propeller Directorate, Aircraft Certification Service, 12 New England Executive Park, Burlington, Massachusetts 01803–5299; telephone (781) 238–7120; facsimile (781) 238– 7199; e-mail marc.bouthillier@faa.gov. For legal questions concerning this rule contact Vincent Bennett, ANF–7 Engine and Propeller Directorate, Aircraft Certification Service, 12 New England Executive Park, Burlington, Massachusetts 01803–5299; telephone (781) 238–7044; facsimile (781) 238– 7055; e-mail vincent.bennett@faa.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Background On December 5, 2005, PWC applied for type certification for a model PW210S turboshaft engine. This engine consists of a two stage compressor driven by a single stage uncooled turbine, and a two stage free power turbine driving a two stage reduction gearbox. The control system includes a dual channel full authority digital electronic control. The engine will incorporate a novel or unusual design feature, which is a 30-minute AEO power rating. This rating was requested by the applicant to support rotorcraft search and rescue missions that require extensive operations at high power. The applicable airworthiness standards do not contain adequate or appropriate airworthiness standards to address this design feature. Therefore a special condition is necessary to apply additional requirements for rating definition, instructions for continued airworthiness (ICA) and endurance testing. The 30-minute time limit applies to each instance the rating is used; however there is no limit to the number of times the rating can be used during any one flight, and there is no cumulative time limitation. The ICA requirement is intended to address the unknown nature of actual rating usage and associated engine deterioration. The applicant is expected to make an assessment of the expected usage and publish ICA’s and airworthiness limitations section (ALS) limits in accordance with those assumptions, such that engine deterioration is not VerDate Mar<15>2010 15:08 Jul 08, 2011 Jkt 223001 excessive. The endurance test requirement of 25 hours operation at 30minute AEO rating is similar to several special conditions issued over the past 20 years addressing the same subject. Because the PWC model PW210S turboshaft engine has a continuous OEI rating and limits equal to or higher then the 30-minute AEO rating, the test time performed at the continuous OEI rating may be credited toward the 25-hour requirement. However, test time spent at other rating elements of the test, such as takeoff or other OEI ratings (that may be equal to or higher values), may not be counted toward the 25 hours of required running. These special conditions contain the additional airworthiness standards necessary to establish a level of safety equivalent to the level that would result from compliance with the applicable standards of airworthiness in effect on the date of application. Type Certification Basis Under the provisions of 14 CFR 21.17(a) and 21.101(a), PWC must show that the model PW210S turboshaft engine meets the provisions of the applicable regulations in effect on the date of application, unless otherwise specified by the FAA. The application date is December 5, 2005, which corresponds to 14 CFR part 33 Amendment 20. However, PWC has elected to demonstrate compliance to later amendments of part 33 for this model. Therefore, the certification basis for the PW210S model turboshaft engine will be part 33, effective February 1, 1965, amended by Amendments 33–1 through 33–24. The FAA has determined that the applicable airworthiness regulations (14 CFR part 33, Amendments 1–24 inclusive) do not contain adequate or appropriate safety standards for the model PW210 turboshaft engine, because of a novel or unusual rating. Therefore, special conditions are prescribed under the provisions of 14 CFR 11.19 and 14 CFR 21.16. The FAA issues special conditions, as defined by 14 CFR 11.19, in accordance with 14 CFR 11.38, which become part of the type certification basis in accordance with § 21.17(b)(2). Special conditions are initially applicable to the model for which they are issued. Should the type certificate for that model be amended later to include another related model that incorporates the same or similar novel or unusual design feature, or should any other model already included on the same type certificate be modified to incorporate the same or similar novel or unusual design feature, the special PO 00000 Frm 00003 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 40595 conditions would also apply to the other model. Novel or Unusual Design Features The PWC PW210S turboshaft engine will incorporate a novel or unusual design feature which is a 30-minute AEO power rating, for use up to 30minutes at any time between the takeoff and landing phases of a flight. This design feature is considered to be novel and unusual relative to the part 33 airworthiness standards. Discussion of Comments Notice of proposed special conditions, Notice No. 33–10–02–SC for the PW210S engine model was published on March 1, 2011 (76 FR 11172). One comment letter was received. The commenter stated disagreement with the special condition requirement of incorporating 25 hours of operation at the 30-minutes AEO rating into the § 33.87 test profile. The commenter proposing taking credit for the 30minute periods run at takeoff rating that is part of the normal test profile required by § 33.87(b), thereby reducing the amount of test time at the new 30minute AEO rating. The FAA does not concur. The takeoff rating and other normal use ratings are defined within 14 CFR part 1 and the associated requirements can be found in 14 CFR part 33 Takeoff rating is limited in use to a continuous period of not more then 5 minutes during takeoff operations, which occurs each flight. The existing § 33.87 requirements are designed to demonstrate engine durability for the takeoff rating which is considered a normal every flight operation, and is independent of any other ratings The proposed 30-minute rating is not defined within 14 CFR, but has been specifically requested by PWC. This new rating can be used for periods of up to 30-minutes at any time during a flight for a variety of normal mission purposes. Also, the number of usages during a single flight is not limited; and its use does not require special maintenance actions. So this rating is intended for normal mission use, similar to takeoff and other normal use ratings, and is different than limited turboshaft one-engine-inoperative (OEI) ratings. The OEI ratings for turboshafts, with the exception of continuous OEI, are for limited use during a flight and in some cases limited cumulative use. Therefore engine durability using the 30-minute AEO rating must be demonstrated over and above the takeoff rating and other normal use ratings included in the rating structure. So the baseline for endurance testing will be § 33.87(b) (no OEI rating). The FAA also E:\FR\FM\11JYR1.SGM 11JYR1 erowe on DSK5CLS3C1PROD with RULES 40596 Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 132 / Monday, July 11, 2011 / Rules and Regulations finds that the test time associated with the continuous OEI rating is an appropriate baseline to define additional requirements for this new normal use 30- minute AEO rating. Therefore, engine durability using this rating must be demonstrated over and above the takeoff rating and other normal use ratings included in the rating structure. No changes to the special conditions have been made in this regard. The commenter also states that the 25 hour requirement is inconsistent with § 33.87 philosophies, stating that time at any rating validates any lower rating. This statement is incorrect. The test requirements are established to demonstrate engine durability at all normal and emergency ratings and associated limits. The test profiles incorporate specific elements to this end. The normal ratings all have individual elements that must be performed. The 30-minutes AEO rating is a normal use rating that is expected to be used with a frequency of occurrence similar to the takeoff or maximum continuous ratings, and must have a specific and independent element as part of the overall test. Also, the expectation is that 30-minute AEO will be used far more frequently than any emergency 0E1 rating. These emergency ratings must also be demonstrated (when applicable) however due to their limited use, these elements of the test may overlap certain normal rating elements found in the various test profiles. The practice mentioned by the commenter is applied to OEI ratings only, because they are rarely used and only in emergency situations. Therefore, the frequency of occurrence for normal use ratings dictate that specific test time be allocated to each rating, and that time can’t be combined because a rating is higher than another. No changes to the special conditions have been made in this regard. The commenter also states that the basis for 25 hours of required run time was not described in the special condition. The 25 hours was selected to be between the basic cumulative run time for takeoff rating (18.75 hours) and maximum continuous rating (45 hours). This requirement is weighted more heavily toward the takeoff time due to the severe nature of the rating and intended operation. Therefore, no changes to the special conditions have been made in this regard. Applicability These special conditions are applicable to the PWC PW210S turbo VerDate Mar<15>2010 15:08 Jul 08, 2011 Jkt 223001 shaft engine. If PWC applies later for a change to the type certificate to include another closely related model incorporating the same novel or unusual design feature, these special conditions may also apply to that model as well, and would be made part of the certification basis for that model. Conclusion We reviewed the available data, including the comment received, and have determined that air safety and the public interest require adopting this special condition with the changes described above. This action affects only certain novel or unusual design features on one model of engine. It is not a rule of general applicability, and it affects only the applicant who applied to the FAA for approval of this feature on the engine product. List of Subjects in 14 CFR Part 33 Air transportation, Aircraft, Aviation safety, Safety. The authority citation for these special conditions is as follows: Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40113, 44701– 44702, 44704. The Proposed Special Conditions Accordingly, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) issues the following special conditions as part of the type certification basis for the PWC PW210S turbo shaft engine. 1. PART 1 DEFINITION. Unless otherwise approved by the Administrator and documented in the appropriate manuals and certification documents, the following definition applies to this special condition: ‘‘Rated 30 Minute AEO Power’’, means the approved shaft horsepower developed under static conditions at the specified altitude and temperature, and within the operating limitations established under part 33, and limited in use to periods not exceeding 30- minutes each. 2. PART 33 REQUIREMENTS. (a) Sections 33.1 Applicability and 33.3 General: As applicable, all documentation, testing and analysis required to comply with the part 33 certification basis, must account for the 30-minute AEO rating, limits and usage. (b) Section 33.4, instructions for continued airworthiness (ICA). In addition to the requirements of § 33.4, the ICA must: (1) Include instructions to ensure that in-service engine deterioration due to rated 30-minute AEO power usage will not be excessive, meaning that all other approved ratings are available within associated limits and assumed usage, for successive flights; and that deterioration PO 00000 Frm 00004 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 will not exceed that assumed for declaring a time between overhaul (TBO) period. (i) The applicant must validate the adequacy of the maintenance actions required under paragraph (b)(1) above. (2) Include in the airworthiness limitations section (ALS), any mandatory inspections and serviceability limits related to the use of the 30-minute AEO rating. (c) Section 33.87, Endurance Test. In addition to the requirements of §§ 33.87(a) and 33.87(d), the overall test run must include a minimum of 25 hours of operation at 30-minute AEO power and limits, divided into periods of 30-minutes AEO power with alternate periods at maximum continuous power or less. (1) Modification of the § 33.87 test requirements to include the 25 hours of operation at 30- minute AEO power rating must be proposed by the Applicant and accepted by the FAA. (2) Each § 33.87(d) continuous oneengine-inoperative (0EI) rating test period of 30-minutes or longer, run at power and limits equal to or higher then the 30-minutes AEO raring, may be credited toward this requirement. Note that the test time required for the takeoff or other OEI ratings may not be counted toward the 25 hours of operation required at the 30-minute AEO rating. Issued in Burlington, Massachusetts, on June 29, 2011. Robert J. Ganley, Acting Manager, Engine and Propeller Directorate, Aircraft Certification Service. [FR Doc. 2011–17298 Filed 7–8–11; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE M DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 [Docket No. FAA–2010–0853; Directorate Identifier 2010–NM–116–AD; Amendment 39–16720; AD 2011–12–13] RIN 2120–AA64 Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 737–600, –700, –700C, –800, –900, and –900ER Series Airplanes Correction In rule document 2011–14344 appearing on pages 35327–35330 in the issue of June 17, 2011, make the following correction: The table on page 35329 should read: E:\FR\FM\11JYR1.SGM 11JYR1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 76, Number 132 (Monday, July 11, 2011)]
[Rules and Regulations]
[Pages 40594-40596]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2011-17298]


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DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

Federal Aviation Administration

14 CFR Part 33

[Docket No. NE131; Special Conditions No. 33-009-SC]


Special Conditions: Pratt and Whitney Canada Model PW210S 
Turboshaft Engine

AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT.

ACTION: Final special conditions.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: These special conditions are issued for Pratt and Whitney 
Canada (PWC) model PW210S engines. The engine model will have a novel 
or unusual design feature which is a 30- minute all engine operating 
(AEO) power rating. This rating is generally intended to be used for 
hovering at increased power for search and rescue missions. The 
applicable airworthiness regulations do not contain adequate or

[[Page 40595]]

appropriate safety standards for this design feature. These special 
conditions contain the added safety standards that the Administrator 
considers necessary to establish a level of safety equivalent to that 
established by the existing airworthiness standards.

DATES: The effective date of these special conditions is August 10, 
2011.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: For technical questions concerning 
this rule contact Marc Bouthillier, ANE-111, Engine and Propeller 
Directorate, Aircraft Certification Service, 12 New England Executive 
Park, Burlington, Massachusetts 01803-5299; telephone (781) 238-7120; 
facsimile (781) 238-7199; e-mail marc.bouthillier@faa.gov. For legal 
questions concerning this rule contact Vincent Bennett, ANF-7 Engine 
and Propeller Directorate, Aircraft Certification Service, 12 New 
England Executive Park, Burlington, Massachusetts 01803-5299; telephone 
(781) 238-7044; facsimile (781) 238-7055; e-mail 
vincent.bennett@faa.gov.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: 

Background

    On December 5, 2005, PWC applied for type certification for a model 
PW210S turboshaft engine. This engine consists of a two stage 
compressor driven by a single stage uncooled turbine, and a two stage 
free power turbine driving a two stage reduction gearbox. The control 
system includes a dual channel full authority digital electronic 
control. The engine will incorporate a novel or unusual design feature, 
which is a 30-minute AEO power rating. This rating was requested by the 
applicant to support rotorcraft search and rescue missions that require 
extensive operations at high power.
    The applicable airworthiness standards do not contain adequate or 
appropriate airworthiness standards to address this design feature. 
Therefore a special condition is necessary to apply additional 
requirements for rating definition, instructions for continued 
airworthiness (ICA) and endurance testing. The 30-minute time limit 
applies to each instance the rating is used; however there is no limit 
to the number of times the rating can be used during any one flight, 
and there is no cumulative time limitation. The ICA requirement is 
intended to address the unknown nature of actual rating usage and 
associated engine deterioration. The applicant is expected to make an 
assessment of the expected usage and publish ICA's and airworthiness 
limitations section (ALS) limits in accordance with those assumptions, 
such that engine deterioration is not excessive. The endurance test 
requirement of 25 hours operation at 30-minute AEO rating is similar to 
several special conditions issued over the past 20 years addressing the 
same subject. Because the PWC model PW210S turboshaft engine has a 
continuous OEI rating and limits equal to or higher then the 30-minute 
AEO rating, the test time performed at the continuous OEI rating may be 
credited toward the 25-hour requirement. However, test time spent at 
other rating elements of the test, such as takeoff or other OEI ratings 
(that may be equal to or higher values), may not be counted toward the 
25 hours of required running.
    These special conditions contain the additional airworthiness 
standards necessary to establish a level of safety equivalent to the 
level that would result from compliance with the applicable standards 
of airworthiness in effect on the date of application.

Type Certification Basis

    Under the provisions of 14 CFR 21.17(a) and 21.101(a), PWC must 
show that the model PW210S turboshaft engine meets the provisions of 
the applicable regulations in effect on the date of application, unless 
otherwise specified by the FAA. The application date is December 5, 
2005, which corresponds to 14 CFR part 33 Amendment 20. However, PWC 
has elected to demonstrate compliance to later amendments of part 33 
for this model. Therefore, the certification basis for the PW210S model 
turboshaft engine will be part 33, effective February 1, 1965, amended 
by Amendments 33-1 through 33-24.
    The FAA has determined that the applicable airworthiness 
regulations (14 CFR part 33, Amendments 1-24 inclusive) do not contain 
adequate or appropriate safety standards for the model PW210 turboshaft 
engine, because of a novel or unusual rating. Therefore, special 
conditions are prescribed under the provisions of 14 CFR 11.19 and 14 
CFR 21.16.
    The FAA issues special conditions, as defined by 14 CFR 11.19, in 
accordance with 14 CFR 11.38, which become part of the type 
certification basis in accordance with Sec.  21.17(b)(2).
    Special conditions are initially applicable to the model for which 
they are issued. Should the type certificate for that model be amended 
later to include another related model that incorporates the same or 
similar novel or unusual design feature, or should any other model 
already included on the same type certificate be modified to 
incorporate the same or similar novel or unusual design feature, the 
special conditions would also apply to the other model.

Novel or Unusual Design Features

    The PWC PW210S turboshaft engine will incorporate a novel or 
unusual design feature which is a 30-minute AEO power rating, for use 
up to 30-minutes at any time between the takeoff and landing phases of 
a flight. This design feature is considered to be novel and unusual 
relative to the part 33 airworthiness standards.

Discussion of Comments

    Notice of proposed special conditions, Notice No. 33-10-02-SC for 
the PW210S engine model was published on March 1, 2011 (76 FR 11172). 
One comment letter was received. The commenter stated disagreement with 
the special condition requirement of incorporating 25 hours of 
operation at the 30-minutes AEO rating into the Sec.  33.87 test 
profile. The commenter proposing taking credit for the 30-minute 
periods run at takeoff rating that is part of the normal test profile 
required by Sec.  33.87(b), thereby reducing the amount of test time at 
the new 30-minute AEO rating. The FAA does not concur. The takeoff 
rating and other normal use ratings are defined within 14 CFR part 1 
and the associated requirements can be found in 14 CFR part 33 Takeoff 
rating is limited in use to a continuous period of not more then 5 
minutes during takeoff operations, which occurs each flight. The 
existing Sec.  33.87 requirements are designed to demonstrate engine 
durability for the takeoff rating which is considered a normal every 
flight operation, and is independent of any other ratings The proposed 
30-minute rating is not defined within 14 CFR, but has been 
specifically requested by PWC. This new rating can be used for periods 
of up to 30-minutes at any time during a flight for a variety of normal 
mission purposes. Also, the number of usages during a single flight is 
not limited; and its use does not require special maintenance actions. 
So this rating is intended for normal mission use, similar to takeoff 
and other normal use ratings, and is different than limited turboshaft 
one-engine-inoperative (OEI) ratings. The OEI ratings for turboshafts, 
with the exception of continuous OEI, are for limited use during a 
flight and in some cases limited cumulative use. Therefore engine 
durability using the 30-minute AEO rating must be demonstrated over and 
above the takeoff rating and other normal use ratings included in the 
rating structure. So the baseline for endurance testing will be Sec.  
33.87(b) (no OEI rating). The FAA also

[[Page 40596]]

finds that the test time associated with the continuous OEI rating is 
an appropriate baseline to define additional requirements for this new 
normal use 30- minute AEO rating. Therefore, engine durability using 
this rating must be demonstrated over and above the takeoff rating and 
other normal use ratings included in the rating structure. No changes 
to the special conditions have been made in this regard.
    The commenter also states that the 25 hour requirement is 
inconsistent with Sec.  33.87 philosophies, stating that time at any 
rating validates any lower rating. This statement is incorrect. The 
test requirements are established to demonstrate engine durability at 
all normal and emergency ratings and associated limits. The test 
profiles incorporate specific elements to this end. The normal ratings 
all have individual elements that must be performed. The 30-minutes AEO 
rating is a normal use rating that is expected to be used with a 
frequency of occurrence similar to the takeoff or maximum continuous 
ratings, and must have a specific and independent element as part of 
the overall test. Also, the expectation is that 30-minute AEO will be 
used far more frequently than any emergency 0E1 rating. These emergency 
ratings must also be demonstrated (when applicable) however due to 
their limited use, these elements of the test may overlap certain 
normal rating elements found in the various test profiles. The practice 
mentioned by the commenter is applied to OEI ratings only, because they 
are rarely used and only in emergency situations. Therefore, the 
frequency of occurrence for normal use ratings dictate that specific 
test time be allocated to each rating, and that time can't be combined 
because a rating is higher than another. No changes to the special 
conditions have been made in this regard.
    The commenter also states that the basis for 25 hours of required 
run time was not described in the special condition. The 25 hours was 
selected to be between the basic cumulative run time for takeoff rating 
(18.75 hours) and maximum continuous rating (45 hours). This 
requirement is weighted more heavily toward the takeoff time due to the 
severe nature of the rating and intended operation. Therefore, no 
changes to the special conditions have been made in this regard.

Applicability

    These special conditions are applicable to the PWC PW210S turbo 
shaft engine. If PWC applies later for a change to the type certificate 
to include another closely related model incorporating the same novel 
or unusual design feature, these special conditions may also apply to 
that model as well, and would be made part of the certification basis 
for that model.

Conclusion

    We reviewed the available data, including the comment received, and 
have determined that air safety and the public interest require 
adopting this special condition with the changes described above. This 
action affects only certain novel or unusual design features on one 
model of engine. It is not a rule of general applicability, and it 
affects only the applicant who applied to the FAA for approval of this 
feature on the engine product.

List of Subjects in 14 CFR Part 33

    Air transportation, Aircraft, Aviation safety, Safety.

    The authority citation for these special conditions is as follows:

    Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40113, 44701-44702, 44704.

The Proposed Special Conditions

    Accordingly, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) issues the 
following special conditions as part of the type certification basis 
for the PWC PW210S turbo shaft engine.
    1. PART 1 DEFINITION. Unless otherwise approved by the 
Administrator and documented in the appropriate manuals and 
certification documents, the following definition applies to this 
special condition: ``Rated 30 Minute AEO Power'', means the approved 
shaft horsepower developed under static conditions at the specified 
altitude and temperature, and within the operating limitations 
established under part 33, and limited in use to periods not exceeding 
30- minutes each.
    2. PART 33 REQUIREMENTS.
    (a) Sections 33.1 Applicability and 33.3 General: As applicable, 
all documentation, testing and analysis required to comply with the 
part 33 certification basis, must account for the 30-minute AEO rating, 
limits and usage.
    (b) Section 33.4, instructions for continued airworthiness (ICA). 
In addition to the requirements of Sec.  33.4, the ICA must:
    (1) Include instructions to ensure that in-service engine 
deterioration due to rated 30-minute AEO power usage will not be 
excessive, meaning that all other approved ratings are available within 
associated limits and assumed usage, for successive flights; and that 
deterioration will not exceed that assumed for declaring a time between 
overhaul (TBO) period.
    (i) The applicant must validate the adequacy of the maintenance 
actions required under paragraph (b)(1) above.
    (2) Include in the airworthiness limitations section (ALS), any 
mandatory inspections and serviceability limits related to the use of 
the 30-minute AEO rating.
    (c) Section 33.87, Endurance Test. In addition to the requirements 
of Sec. Sec.  33.87(a) and 33.87(d), the overall test run must include 
a minimum of 25 hours of operation at 30-minute AEO power and limits, 
divided into periods of 30-minutes AEO power with alternate periods at 
maximum continuous power or less.
    (1) Modification of the Sec.  33.87 test requirements to include 
the 25 hours of operation at 30- minute AEO power rating must be 
proposed by the Applicant and accepted by the FAA.
    (2) Each Sec.  33.87(d) continuous one-engine-inoperative (0EI) 
rating test period of 30-minutes or longer, run at power and limits 
equal to or higher then the 30-minutes AEO raring, may be credited 
toward this requirement. Note that the test time required for the 
takeoff or other OEI ratings may not be counted toward the 25 hours of 
operation required at the 30-minute AEO rating.

    Issued in Burlington, Massachusetts, on June 29, 2011.
Robert J. Ganley,
Acting Manager, Engine and Propeller Directorate, Aircraft 
Certification Service.
[FR Doc. 2011-17298 Filed 7-8-11; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE M