Waiver of Restriction on Assistance to the Central Government of Uzbekistan, 39470 [2011-16900]

Download as PDF 39470 Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 129 / Wednesday, July 6, 2011 / Notices (e)(1), (e)(4)(G), (e)(4)(H), (e)(4)(I) and (f) 2007). See 22 CFR 171.36(b)(1), (b)(2), and (b)(3) (2007). [FR Doc. 2011–16898 Filed 7–5–11; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4710–24–P DEPARTMENT OF STATE [Public Notice 7514] Waiver of Restriction on Assistance to the Central Government of Uzbekistan Pursuant to Section 7086(c)(2) of the Department of State, Foreign Operations, and Related Programs Appropriations Act, 2010 (Division F, Pub. L.111–117), as carried forward by the Full-Year Continuing Appropriations Act, 2011 (Div. B, Pub. L. 112–10) (‘‘the Act’’), and Department of State Delegation of Authority Number 245–1, I hereby determine that it is important to the national interest of the United States to waive the requirements of Section 7086(c)(1) of the Act with respect to Uzbekistan and I hereby waive such restriction. This determination shall be reported to the Congress, and published in the Federal Register. Dated: June 24, 2011. Thomas Nides, Deputy Secretary of State for Management and Resources. [FR Doc. 2011–16900 Filed 7–5–11; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4710–31–P TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY Integrated Resource Plan Tennessee Valley Authority. Issuance of Record of Decision. AGENCY: ACTION: This notice is provided in accordance with the Council on Environmental Quality’s regulations (40 CFR parts 1500 to 1508) and TVA’s procedures for implementing the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). TVA has decided to adopt the preferred alternative in its final environmental impact statement (EIS) for the Integrated Resource Plan (IRP). The notice of availability (NOA) of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Integrated Resource Plan was published in the Federal Register on March 11, 2011. The TVA Board of Directors accepted the IRP and authorized staff to implement the preferred alternative at its April 14, 2011, meeting. This alternative, the Preferred Planning Direction, will guide TVA’s selection of energy resource options to meet the energy needs of the Tennessee Valley region over the next sroberts on DSK5SPTVN1PROD with NOTICES SUMMARY: VerDate Mar<15>2010 18:17 Jul 05, 2011 Jkt 223001 20 years. The energy resource options include new nuclear, natural gas-fired, and renewable generation, increased energy efficiency and demand reduction, decreased coal-fired generation, and new energy storage capacity. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Charles P. Nicholson, NEPA Compliance Manager, Tennessee Valley Authority, 400 West Summit Hill Drive, WT 11D, Knoxville, Tennessee 37902– 1499; telephone 865–632–3582, or email cpnicholson@tva.gov; Randall E. Johnson, IRP Project Manager, Tennessee Valley Authority, 1101 Market Street, LP 5D–C, Chattanooga, Tennessee 37402; telephone 423–751– 3520, or e-mail rejohnson1@tva.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: TVA is an agency and instrumentality of the United States, established by an act of Congress in 1933, to foster the social and economic welfare of the people of the Tennessee Valley region and to promote the proper use and conservation of the region’s natural resources. One component of this mission is the generation, transmission, and sale of reliable and affordable electric energy. TVA operates the nation’s largest public power system, producing 4 percent of all the electricity in the nation. TVA provides electricity to about 9 million people in an 80,000square mile area comprised of most of Tennessee and parts of Virginia, North Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, and Kentucky. It provides wholesale power to 155 independent power distributors and 56 directly served large industrial and Federal customers. The TVA Act requires the TVA power system to be self-supporting and operating on a non-profit basis and directs TVA to sell power at rates as low as are feasible. Dependable generating capacity on the TVA power system is about 37,200 megawatts (MW). TVA generates most of this power with 3 nuclear plants, 11 coal-fired plants, 9 combustion-turbine plants, 3 combined cycle plants, 29 hydroelectric plants, a pumped-storage facility, and several small renewable facilities. A portion of delivered power is provided through long-term power purchase agreements. TVA has generated an annual average of about 153,100 gigawatt hours (GWh) of power in recent years. The major sources for this power were coal (52 percent), nuclear (28 percent), hydroelectric (6 percent), and natural gas (1 percent). Other sources comprised less than 1 percent of TVA generation. The recently completed IRP updates TVA’s 1995 IRP, entitled Energy Vision PO 00000 Frm 00095 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 2020. Consistent with Section 113 of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, the IRP planning process evaluated a range of existing and incremental resources, including new power supplies, energy conservation and efficiency, and renewable energy resources in order to provide TVA’s customers adequate and reliable service at the lowest system cost. Future Demand for Energy TVA uses state-of-the-art energy forecasting models to predict future demands on its system. Because of the uncertainty in predicting future demands, TVA developed high, medium, and low forecasts for both peak load (in MW) and annual net system energy (in GWh) through 2029. Peak load is predicted to grow at an average annual rate of 1.3 percent in the medium-growth Spring 2010 Reference Case, decrease slightly and then remain flat under the low-growth forecast, and grow at an annual rate of 2.0 percent under the high-growth forecast. Net system energy is predicted to grow at an average annual rate of 1.1 percent in the medium-growth case, decrease slightly and then remain flat under the lowgrowth forecast, and grow at an annual rate of 1.9 percent under the highgrowth forecast. Based on these load growth forecasts, TVA’s current firm capacity (including TVA generation, energy efficiency and demand response (EEDR) measures, and power purchase agreements), and a 15 percent reserve capacity requirement, TVA would need additional capacity and generation or EEDR in the future. The medium growth case need for additional generating capacity or EEDR programs is about 9,600 MWs and 29,100 GWhs of generation in 2019 and about 15,500 MWs and 45,000 GWhs in 2029. Corresponding needs for the high growth forecast are about 15,000 MWs and 63,000 GWhs in 2019 and 27,000 MWs and 98,000 GWhs in 2020. Corresponding needs for the low growth forecast are about 1,500 MWs in 2019 and 2,000 MWs in 2029; no additional generation would be required. Alternatives Considered Five alternative energy resource strategies were evaluated in the Draft EIS and IRP. These resource planning strategies were identified as potential alternative means to meet future electrical energy needs on the TVA system (load demand) and achieve a sustainable future, consistent with the Board’s vision and the TVA Environmental Policy. These alternative strategies are: E:\FR\FM\06JYN1.SGM 06JYN1

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[Federal Register Volume 76, Number 129 (Wednesday, July 6, 2011)]
[Notices]
[Page 39470]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2011-16900]


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DEPARTMENT OF STATE

[Public Notice 7514]


Waiver of Restriction on Assistance to the Central Government of 
Uzbekistan

    Pursuant to Section 7086(c)(2) of the Department of State, Foreign 
Operations, and Related Programs Appropriations Act, 2010 (Division F, 
Pub. L.111-117), as carried forward by the Full-Year Continuing 
Appropriations Act, 2011 (Div. B, Pub. L. 112-10) (``the Act''), and 
Department of State Delegation of Authority Number 245-1, I hereby 
determine that it is important to the national interest of the United 
States to waive the requirements of Section 7086(c)(1) of the Act with 
respect to Uzbekistan and I hereby waive such restriction.
    This determination shall be reported to the Congress, and published 
in the Federal Register.

    Dated: June 24, 2011.
Thomas Nides,
 Deputy Secretary of State for Management and Resources.
[FR Doc. 2011-16900 Filed 7-5-11; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4710-31-P