Notice of Inventory Completion: Western Michigan University, Department of Anthropology, Kalamazoo, MI, 36149-36150 [2011-15437]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 119 / Tuesday, June 21, 2011 / Notices Determinations Made by the Fowler Museum at UCLA wwoods2 on DSK1DXX6B1PROD with NOTICES_PART 1 Additional Requestors and Disposition Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains or any other Indian tribe that believes it satisfies the criteria in 43 CFR 10.11(c)(1) should contact Wendy G. Teeter, PhD, Curator of Archaeology, Fowler Museum at UCLA, Box 951549, Los Angeles, CA 90095–1549, telephone (310) 825–1864, before July 21, 2011. Disposition of the human remain to the Wiyot Tribe, California, may proceed after that date if no additional requestors come forward. The Fowler Museum at UCLA is responsible for notifying the Bear River Band of the Rohnerville Rancheria, California; Blue Lake Rancheria, California; Smith River Rancheria, California; Wiyot Tribe, California; and the Yurok Tribe of the Yurok Reservation, California, that this notice has been published. Dated: June 15, 2011. Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2011–15434 Filed 6–20–11; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–P VerDate Mar<15>2010 15:25 Jun 20, 2011 Jkt 223001 National Park Service The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. [2253–665] Consultation Notice of Inventory Completion: Western Michigan University, Department of Anthropology, Kalamazoo, MI A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Western Michigan University, Department of Anthropology, professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, Michigan; Match-e-be-nashshe-wish Band of Pottawatomi Indians of Michigan; Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians, Michigan and Indiana; and the Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Officials of the Fowler Museum at UCLA have determined that: • Based on the analysis performed by a physical anthropologist it is determined that the mandible is Native American. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), a relationship of shared group identity cannot be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and any present-day Indian tribe. • Multiple lines of evidence, including the Wiyot Tribe’s 1978 Constitution, treaties, Acts of Congress, Executive Orders, and other credible lines of evidence obtained through consultation with tribal representatives, indicate that the land from which the Native American human remain was removed is the aboriginal land of the Wiyot people. Present-day Wiyot citizens are enrolled in the following Federally-recognized tribes: the Wiyot Tribe, California; Bear River Band of the Rohnerville Rancheria, California; and Blue Lake Rancheria, California. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remain described in this notice represents the physical remains of one individual of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 43 CFR 10.11(c)(1), the disposition of the human remain is to the Wiyot Tribe, California. 36149 National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Western Michigan University, Department of Anthropology, has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes, and has determined that there is no cultural affiliation between the human remains and associated funerary objects and any present-day Indian tribe. Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary objects may contact the Western Michigan University, Department of Anthropology. Disposition of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Indian tribe stated below may occur if no additional requestors come forward. DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes it has a cultural affiliation with the human remains and associated funerary objects should contact the Western Michigan University, Department of Anthropology, at the address below by July 21, 2011. ADDRESSES: LouAnn Wurst, Department of Anthropology, Western Michigan University, 1005 Moore Hall, Kalamazoo, MI 49008, telephone (269) 387–2753. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects in the possession of the Western Michigan University, Department of Anthropology, Kalamazoo, MI. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from Middlebury Township, Shiawassee County, MI. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3) and 43 CFR 10.11(d). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00072 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 History and Description of the Remains In 1974, human remains representing a minimum of 19 individuals were removed from the Gilde site, Middlebury Township, Shiawassee County, MI. The Michigan History Division, now the Michigan Historical Center, investigated the burials and conducted salvage excavations. The individuals are represented by 2,000 fragmentary remains. The ages of the individuals range from infants to adults, however, a determination of the sex of the individuals was not possible due to the fragmentary nature of the remains. The burial was inadvertently uncovered in 1974 by construction crews of the Central Michigan Sand and Gravel Company during gravel mining. The investigators noted that the heavily disturbed burials consisted of several deep pits covered with red ochre, which indicates that the site dates to the Late Archaic period (3000 B.C. to 1000 B.C.) since the use of red ochre in burials is a hallmark of this period in the Great Lakes. After recovery, the remains and funerary objects were transferred to Western Michigan University’s anthropology department for further curation and study by Dr. Robert Sundick. No known individuals were identified. The 92 associated funerary objects are 79 fragments of bone from two Blue Racer snakes (Columber constrictor foxi), 12 fragments representing white-tailed deer and unidentified small and medium mammals, and 1 lot of soil samples recovered from the excavations. Determinations Made by Western Michigan University, Department of Anthropology Officials of Western Michigan University, Department of Anthropology, have determined that: • Based on skeletal and dental morphology, and the Late Archaic date of the site, the human remains and E:\FR\FM\21JNN1.SGM 21JNN1 36150 Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 119 / Tuesday, June 21, 2011 / Notices associated funerary objects are Native American. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), a relationship of shared group identity cannot be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and any present-day Indian tribe. • Multiple lines of evidence, such as the Treaty of Saginaw 1819 (also known as the Treaty with the Chippewa of 1819), continued occupation of the area, and oral tradition, indicate that the land from which the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects were removed is the aboriginal land of the Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of 19 individuals of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 92 objects described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. • Pursuant to 43 CFR 10.11(c)(1), the disposition of the human remains is to the Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan. wwoods2 on DSK1DXX6B1PROD with NOTICES_PART 1 Additional Requestors and Disposition Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary objects or any other Indian tribe that believes it satisfies the criteria in 43 CFR 10.11(c)(1) should contact LouAnn Wurst, Department of Anthropology, Western Michigan University, 1005 Moore Hall, Kalamazoo, MI 49008, telephone (269) 387–2753, before July 21, 2011. Disposition of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan may proceed after that date if no additional requestors come forward. Western Michigan University, Department of Anthropology, is responsible for notifying the Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, Michigan; Match-e-be-nash-she-wish Band of Pottawatomi Indians of Michigan; Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians, Michigan and Indiana; and the Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan, that this notice has been published. Dated: June 15, 2011. Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2011–15437 Filed 6–20–11; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–P VerDate Mar<15>2010 15:25 Jun 20, 2011 Jkt 223001 DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [2253–665] Notice of Inventory Completion: Florida Department of State/Division of Historical Resources, Tallahassee, FL National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The Florida Department of State/Division of Historical Resources has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes, and has determined that there is no cultural affiliation between the human remains and any present-day Indian tribe. Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains may contact the Florida Department of State/ Division of Historical Resources. Disposition of the human remains to the Indian tribe stated below may occur if no additional requestors come forward. DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes it has a cultural affiliation with the human remains should contact the Florida Department of State/Division of Historical Resources at the address below by July 21, 2011. ADDRESSES: Ryan J. Wheeler, State Archaeologist, Florida Department of State/Division of Historical Resources, 1001 de Soto Park Dr. Tallahassee, FL 32301, telephone (850) 245–6301. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains in the possession of the Florida Department of State/ Division of Historical Resources, Tallahassee, FL. The human remains were removed from Alachua, MiamiDade, Duval, and Sumter Counties, FL. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3) and 43 CFR 10.11(d). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. SUMMARY: Consultation A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Florida Department of State/Division of Historical Resources professional staff in consultation with representatives of PO 00000 Frm 00073 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 the Miccosukee Tribe of Indians of Florida. Requests for consultation were also sent to the Muscogee (Creek) Nation, Oklahoma; Poarch Band of Creek Indians of Alabama; Seminole Nation of Oklahoma; and the Seminole Tribe of Florida (Dania, Big Cypress, Brighton, Hollywood & Tampa Reservations). The Miccosukee Tribe of Indians of Florida requested that the remains described in this notice be transferred to their control so that reburial can occur at or near the original areas of removal. There are no objections to the disposition to the Miccosukee Tribe of Indians of Florida by the other Indian tribes contacted by Florida Department of State/Division of Historical Resources. History and Description of the Remains In October and November 2006, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were removed from site 8AL832, in Alachua County, FL. Archeological site 8AL832 is described as a dense scatter of lithic and ceramic artifacts, associated with the pre-European contact Native American Alachua and St. Johns cultures of the area (circa A.D. 700 to 1500). The remains were found during archeological monitoring during the development of Ficke Gardens at the University of Florida. The archeologists that found the remains contacted the State Archaeologist. Based on consultation with the State Archaeologist, the district medical examiner was asked to investigate the discovery. The district medical examiner, with assistance from the C.A. Pound Human Identification Laboratory and Dr. John Krigbaum, University of Florida, Department of Anthropology, determined that the remains were Native American. On August 11, 2008, the remains were transferred to the Florida Department of State/Division of Historical Resources. The remains of this individual are 12 bone and tooth fragments. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In June 2007, human remains representing a minimum of two individuals were removed from site 8DA5918 at the White Rock Mine, in Miami-Dade County, FL. Archeological site 8DA5918 is described as a multicomponent black earth midden deposit on a relict Everglades tree island, associated with the Archaic and Glades cultures of the area. The human remains are believed to be from the Glades period (circa 500 B.C. to A.D. 1500). The remains of these two individuals are 28 bone and tooth fragments. No known E:\FR\FM\21JNN1.SGM 21JNN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 76, Number 119 (Tuesday, June 21, 2011)]
[Notices]
[Pages 36149-36150]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2011-15437]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[2253-665]


Notice of Inventory Completion: Western Michigan University, 
Department of Anthropology, Kalamazoo, MI

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: Western Michigan University, Department of Anthropology, has 
completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary 
objects, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes, and has 
determined that there is no cultural affiliation between the human 
remains and associated funerary objects and any present-day Indian 
tribe. Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes itself to be 
culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary 
objects may contact the Western Michigan University, Department of 
Anthropology. Disposition of the human remains and associated funerary 
objects to the Indian tribe stated below may occur if no additional 
requestors come forward.

DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes it has a 
cultural affiliation with the human remains and associated funerary 
objects should contact the Western Michigan University, Department of 
Anthropology, at the address below by July 21, 2011.

ADDRESSES: LouAnn Wurst, Department of Anthropology, Western Michigan 
University, 1005 Moore Hall, Kalamazoo, MI 49008, telephone (269) 387-
2753.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance with the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 
U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and 
associated funerary objects in the possession of the Western Michigan 
University, Department of Anthropology, Kalamazoo, MI. The human 
remains and associated funerary objects were removed from Middlebury 
Township, Shiawassee County, MI.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3) and 
43 CFR 10.11(d). The determinations in this notice are the sole 
responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has 
control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary 
objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the 
determinations in this notice.

Consultation

    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Western 
Michigan University, Department of Anthropology, professional staff in 
consultation with representatives of the Little Traverse Bay Bands of 
Odawa Indians, Michigan; Match-e-be-nash-she-wish Band of Pottawatomi 
Indians of Michigan; Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians, Michigan and 
Indiana; and the Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan.

History and Description of the Remains

    In 1974, human remains representing a minimum of 19 individuals 
were removed from the Gilde site, Middlebury Township, Shiawassee 
County, MI. The Michigan History Division, now the Michigan Historical 
Center, investigated the burials and conducted salvage excavations. The 
individuals are represented by 2,000 fragmentary remains. The ages of 
the individuals range from infants to adults, however, a determination 
of the sex of the individuals was not possible due to the fragmentary 
nature of the remains. The burial was inadvertently uncovered in 1974 
by construction crews of the Central Michigan Sand and Gravel Company 
during gravel mining. The investigators noted that the heavily 
disturbed burials consisted of several deep pits covered with red 
ochre, which indicates that the site dates to the Late Archaic period 
(3000 B.C. to 1000 B.C.) since the use of red ochre in burials is a 
hallmark of this period in the Great Lakes. After recovery, the remains 
and funerary objects were transferred to Western Michigan University's 
anthropology department for further curation and study by Dr. Robert 
Sundick. No known individuals were identified. The 92 associated 
funerary objects are 79 fragments of bone from two Blue Racer snakes 
(Columber constrictor foxi), 12 fragments representing white-tailed 
deer and unidentified small and medium mammals, and 1 lot of soil 
samples recovered from the excavations.

Determinations Made by Western Michigan University, Department of 
Anthropology

    Officials of Western Michigan University, Department of 
Anthropology, have determined that:
     Based on skeletal and dental morphology, and the Late 
Archaic date of the site, the human remains and

[[Page 36150]]

associated funerary objects are Native American.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), a relationship of shared 
group identity cannot be reasonably traced between the Native American 
human remains and associated funerary objects and any present-day 
Indian tribe.
     Multiple lines of evidence, such as the Treaty of Saginaw 
1819 (also known as the Treaty with the Chippewa of 1819), continued 
occupation of the area, and oral tradition, indicate that the land from 
which the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects 
were removed is the aboriginal land of the Saginaw Chippewa Indian 
Tribe of Michigan.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described 
in this notice represent the physical remains of 19 individuals of 
Native American ancestry.
     Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 92 objects described 
above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near 
individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the 
death rite or ceremony.
     Pursuant to 43 CFR 10.11(c)(1), the disposition of the 
human remains is to the Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan.

Additional Requestors and Disposition

    Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes itself to be 
culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary 
objects or any other Indian tribe that believes it satisfies the 
criteria in 43 CFR 10.11(c)(1) should contact LouAnn Wurst, Department 
of Anthropology, Western Michigan University, 1005 Moore Hall, 
Kalamazoo, MI 49008, telephone (269) 387-2753, before July 21, 2011. 
Disposition of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the 
Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan may proceed after that date 
if no additional requestors come forward.
    Western Michigan University, Department of Anthropology, is 
responsible for notifying the Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa 
Indians, Michigan; Match-e-be-nash-she-wish Band of Pottawatomi Indians 
of Michigan; Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians, Michigan and Indiana; 
and the Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan, that this notice has 
been published.

    Dated: June 15, 2011.
Sherry Hutt,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2011-15437 Filed 6-20-11; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-P