Regulatory Approach for Commercial Orbital Human Spaceflight, 24836-24837 [2011-10638]

Download as PDF 24836 Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 85 / Tuesday, May 3, 2011 / Proposed Rules Mandatory Service Bulletin A330–55–3042 or A340–55–4038, both dated April 22, 2010, as applicable. (2) For airplanes on which a temporary restoration with resin is done: Within 21 months after doing the temporary restoration, do the permanent restoration, in accordance with the Accomplishment Instructions of Airbus Mandatory Service Bulletin A330–55– 3042 or A340–55–4038, both dated April 22, 2010, as applicable. Reporting Requirements (l) Submit a report of the findings (positive and negative) of the first inspection required by paragraphs (g), (h), and (i) of this AD to Airbus, at the applicable time specified in paragraph (l)(1) or (l)(2) of this AD. The report must include the inspection results, a description of any discrepancies found, the airplane serial number, and the number of landings and flight hours on the airplane. (1) If the inspection was done on or after the effective date of this AD: Submit the report within 30 days after the inspection. (2) If the inspection was done before the effective date of this AD: Submit the report within 30 days after the effective date of this AD. Parts Installation (m) As of the effective date of this AD, no person may install any affected rudder listed in table 1, table, 2, or table 3 of this AD, on any airplane, unless the rudder is inspected as specified in paragraphs (g), (h), and (i) of this AD, as applicable, and all applicable corrective actions specified in paragraph (j) of this AD and applicable restoration specified in paragraph (k) of this AD are done. FAA AD Differences emcdonald on DSK2BSOYB1PROD with PROPOSALS Note 1: This AD differs from the MCAI and/or service information as follows: No differences. 16:20 May 02, 2011 Jkt 223001 Related Information (o) Refer to MCAI EASA Airworthiness Directive 2010–0127, dated June 23, 2010; Airbus Mandatory Service Bulletin A330–55– 3042, dated April 22, 2010; and Airbus Mandatory Service Bulletin A340–55–4038, dated April 22, 2010; for related information. Issued in Renton, Washington, on April 20, 2011. Kalene C. Yanamura, Acting Manager, Transport Airplane Directorate, Aircraft Certification Service. [FR Doc. 2011–10624 Filed 5–2–11; 8:45 am] Other FAA AD Provisions (n) The following provisions also apply to this AD: (1) Alternative Methods of Compliance (AMOCs): The Manager, International Branch, ANM–116, Transport Airplane Directorate, FAA, has the authority to approve AMOCs for this AD, if requested using the procedures found in 14 CFR 39.19. In accordance with 14 CFR 39.19, send your request to your principal inspector or local Flight Standards District Office, as appropriate. If sending information directly to the International Branch, send it to Attn: Vladimir Ulyanov, Aerospace Engineer, International Branch, ANM–116, Transport Airplane Directorate, FAA, 1601 Lind Avenue, SW., Renton, Washington 98057– 3356; telephone (425) 227–1138; fax (425) 227–1149. Information may be e-mailed to: 9–ANM–116–AMOC–REQUESTS@faa.gov. Before using any approved AMOC, notify your appropriate principal inspector, or lacking a principal inspector, the manager of the local flight standards district office/ certificate holding district office. The AMOC approval letter must specifically reference this AD. (2) Airworthy Product: For any requirement in this AD to obtain corrective actions from VerDate Mar<15>2010 a manufacturer or other source, use these actions if they are FAA-approved. Corrective actions are considered FAA-approved if they are approved by the State of Design Authority (or their delegated agent). You are required to assure the product is airworthy before it is returned to service. (3) Reporting Requirements: A federal agency may not conduct or sponsor, and a person is not required to respond to, nor shall a person be subject to a penalty for failure to comply with a collection of information subject to the requirements of the Paperwork Reduction Act unless that collection of information displays a current valid OMB Control Number. The OMB Control Number for this information collection is 2120–0056. Public reporting for this collection of information is estimated to be approximately 5 minutes per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, completing and reviewing the collection of information. All responses to this collection of information are mandatory. Comments concerning the accuracy of this burden and suggestions for reducing the burden should be directed to the FAA at: 800 Independence Ave., SW., Washington, DC 20591, Attn: Information Collection Clearance Officer, AES–200. BILLING CODE 4910–13–P DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 460 Regulatory Approach for Commercial Orbital Human Spaceflight Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. AGENCY: This notice announces a public meeting to solicit comments and information from the public on the regulatory approach to commercial orbital human spaceflight by the FAA. This public meeting is intended to aid the FAA in its regulatory effort by receiving early input from the affected community. DATES: The meeting is scheduled for Thursday, May 26, 2011, starting at 8:30 a.m. Eastern Daylight Time. Written SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00021 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 comments submitted to the docket must be received no later than June 9, 2011. ADDRESSES: DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Cocoa Beach Oceanfront, 2080 North Atlantic Avenue, Cocoa Beach, FL 32931. Persons who are unable to attend the meeting, or who otherwise wish to submit written comments, may send comments identified by Docket Number FAA–2011–0446 using any of the following methods: • Federal eRulemaking Portal: Go to https://www.regulations.gov and follow the online instructions for sending your comments electronically. • Mail: Send comments to Docket Operations, M–30; U.S. Department of Transportation, 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE., Room W12–140, West Building Ground Floor, Washington, DC 20590–0001. • Hand Delivery or Courier: Take comments to Docket Operations in Room W12–140 of the West Building Ground Floor at 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE., Washington, DC, between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. • Fax: Fax comments to Docket Operations at 202–493–2251. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Randy Repcheck, Deputy Division Manager, Regulations and Analysis Division, AST–300, Office of Commercial Space Transportation, Federal Aviation Administration, 800 Independence Avenue, SW., Washington, DC 20591, Telephone (202) 267–8760, or e-mail at randy.repcheck@faa.gov; or Laura Montgomery, Senior Attorney for Commercial Space Transportation, Regulations Division, AGC–200, Office of the Chief Counsel, Federal Aviation Administration, 800 Independence Avenue, SW., Washington, DC 20591, Telephone (202) 267–3150, or e-mail at laura.montgomery@faa.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: 51 U.S.C. Subtitle V, chapter 509 (Chapter 509) authorizes the Secretary of Transportation and, through delegations, the FAA’s Associate Administrator for Commercial Space Transportation, to oversee, license, and regulate both launches and reentries, and the operation of launch and reentry sites when carried out by U.S. citizens or within the United States. 51 U.S.C. 50904, 50905. Chapter 509 directs the FAA to exercise this responsibility consistent with public health and safety, safety of property, and the national security and foreign policy interests of the United States, and to encourage, facilitate, and promote commercial E:\FR\FM\03MYP1.SGM 03MYP1 emcdonald on DSK2BSOYB1PROD with PROPOSALS Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 85 / Tuesday, May 3, 2011 / Proposed Rules space launch and reentry by the private sector. 51 U.S.C. 50905, 50903. The Commercial Space Launch Amendments Act of 2004 (CSLAA) assigned the FAA responsibility for regulating commercial human space flight. In December 2006, the FAA issued human space flight regulations in accordance with its authority to protect public health and safety. The CSLAA prohibits the FAA from proposing regulations governing the design or operation of a launch vehicle to protect the health and safety of crew and space flight participants until December 23, 2012, or until a design feature or operating practice has resulted in a serious or fatal injury, or contributed to an event that posed a high risk of causing a death or serious injury, to crew or space flight participants during a licensed or permitted commercial human space flight. 51 U.S.C. 50905(c)(2) and (3). Until such time, the CSLAA only requires that a space flight participant be informed of the risks of taking a ride on a rocket. 51 U.S.C. 50905(b)(5). The FAA may also issue regulations setting reasonable requirements for space flight participants, including medical and training requirements. 51 U.S.C. 50905(b)(6). Because of recent changes in U.S. policy and the effect they have had on the commercial space transportation industry, the FAA is planning to propose regulations to protect the health and safety of crew and space flight participants for orbital human spaceflight as soon as circumstances require after December 23, 2012. This initiative is driven by the fact that the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is planning to contract with the private sector to transport NASA astronauts to the International Space Station within a few years, and is in the process of developing requirements for its procurement of such services. The FAA’s role in these flights is still in work, but the transport of private individuals to Earth orbit, which would require an FAA license, is expected to use the same space transportation systems. The FAA believes it is important to establish a regulatory foundation as early as possible to provide industry assurance that systems built to support NASA’s missions will be compatible with future FAA regulations. The CSLAA mandates that any regulations governing the design or operation of a launch vehicle to protect the health and safety of crew and space flight participants must take into consideration the evolving standards of VerDate Mar<15>2010 16:20 May 02, 2011 Jkt 223001 safety in the commercial space flight industry. 51 U.S.C. 50905(c)(3). We fully concur. When developed, the proposed regulations are planned to be a starting point for a regulatory regime that will evolve over time as the industry matures. Moreover, in order to facilitate the development of a successful commercial human space transportation industry, the FAA and NASA must develop complementary safety regimes for orbital human space flight. As noted above, NASA has already begun to develop requirements for its procurement of orbital transport services. The public meeting will allow a large cross-section of the interested public to share views with each other and the FAA, and assist the FAA in redefining the regulatory framework for orbital human spaceflight. The FAA will share its current philosophy, but is most interested in the public’s view on a number of regulatory issues such as— • What the appropriate regulatory scope and breadth should be, • What the appropriate mix of performance-based, process-based, and prescriptive requirements should be, • What the appropriate level of safety the FAA should target with its regulations, • What, if any, should be the medical requirements for space flight participants, • How best to incorporate government and industry standards into the licensing process, • How much flight testing should be required, and • How much control over a spacecraft ground personnel and flight crew should have. Any member of the public may present oral statements at the meeting. For planning purposes please inform a person listed in the FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT section by May 20, 2011, although we will accommodate uncoordinated statements. Written comments are also welcome during or after the meeting, but must be submitted to the docket by June 9, 2011. Privacy: We will post all comments we receive, without change, to https:// www.regulations.gov, including any personal information you provide. Using the search function of the docket web site, anyone can find and read the electronic form of all comments received into any of our dockets, including the name of the individual sending the comment (or signing the comment for an association, business, labor union, etc.). You may review the Department of Transportation’s complete Privacy Act Statement in the PO 00000 Frm 00022 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 24837 Federal Register published on April 11, 2000, (65 FR 19477–78), or you may visit https://DocketsInfo.dot.gov. Docket: To read background documents or comments received, go to https://www.regulations.gov at any time and follow the online instructions for accessing the docket or Docket Operations in Room W12–140 of the West Building Ground Floor at 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE., Washington, DC, between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. Issued in Washington, DC on April 26, 2011. George C. Nield, Associate Administrator for Commercial Space Transportation. [FR Doc. 2011–10638 Filed 5–2–11; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–13–P DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 [Docket No. USCG–2011–0044] RIN 1625–AA11 Regulated Navigation Area; Columbus Day Weekend, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL Coast Guard, DHS. Notice of proposed rulemaking. AGENCY: ACTION: The Coast Guard proposes to establish a permanent regulated navigation area (RNA) on Biscayne Bay in Miami, Florida. The RNA would be enforced annually on the Saturday and Sunday of the second week in October (Columbus Day weekend). It would include all waters within one nautical mile of the center of the Intracoastal Waterway between Featherbed Bank and the Rickenbacker Causeway Bridge. All vessels within the RNA would be: Required to transit the regulated navigation area at no more than 15 knots; subject to control by the Coast Guard; and required to follow the instructions of all law enforcement vessels in the area. This RNA is necessary to ensure the safe transit of vessels and to protect the marine environment. DATES: Comments and related material must be received by the Coast Guard on or before July 14, 2011. Requests for public meetings must be received by the Coast Guard on or before June 14, 2011. ADDRESSES: You may submit comments identified by docket number USCG– 2011–0044 using any one of the following methods: SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\03MYP1.SGM 03MYP1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 76, Number 85 (Tuesday, May 3, 2011)]
[Proposed Rules]
[Pages 24836-24837]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2011-10638]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

Federal Aviation Administration

14 CFR Part 460


Regulatory Approach for Commercial Orbital Human Spaceflight

AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT.

ACTION: Notice of public meeting.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: This notice announces a public meeting to solicit comments and 
information from the public on the regulatory approach to commercial 
orbital human spaceflight by the FAA. This public meeting is intended 
to aid the FAA in its regulatory effort by receiving early input from 
the affected community.

DATES: The meeting is scheduled for Thursday, May 26, 2011, starting at 
8:30 a.m. Eastern Daylight Time. Written comments submitted to the 
docket must be received no later than June 9, 2011.

ADDRESSES: DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Cocoa Beach Oceanfront, 2080 
North Atlantic Avenue, Cocoa Beach, FL 32931.
    Persons who are unable to attend the meeting, or who otherwise wish 
to submit written comments, may send comments identified by Docket 
Number FAA-2011-0446 using any of the following methods:
     Federal eRulemaking Portal: Go to https://www.regulations.gov and follow the online instructions for sending your 
comments electronically.
     Mail: Send comments to Docket Operations, M-30; U.S. 
Department of Transportation, 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE., Room W12-
140, West Building Ground Floor, Washington, DC 20590-0001.
     Hand Delivery or Courier: Take comments to Docket 
Operations in Room W12-140 of the West Building Ground Floor at 1200 
New Jersey Avenue, SE., Washington, DC, between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., 
Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays.
     Fax: Fax comments to Docket Operations at 202-493-2251.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Randy Repcheck, Deputy Division 
Manager, Regulations and Analysis Division, AST-300, Office of 
Commercial Space Transportation, Federal Aviation Administration, 800 
Independence Avenue, SW., Washington, DC 20591, Telephone (202) 267-
8760, or e-mail at randy.repcheck@faa.gov; or Laura Montgomery, Senior 
Attorney for Commercial Space Transportation, Regulations Division, 
AGC-200, Office of the Chief Counsel, Federal Aviation Administration, 
800 Independence Avenue, SW., Washington, DC 20591, Telephone (202) 
267-3150, or e-mail at laura.montgomery@faa.gov.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: 51 U.S.C. Subtitle V, chapter 509 (Chapter 
509) authorizes the Secretary of Transportation and, through 
delegations, the FAA's Associate Administrator for Commercial Space 
Transportation, to oversee, license, and regulate both launches and 
reentries, and the operation of launch and reentry sites when carried 
out by U.S. citizens or within the United States. 51 U.S.C. 50904, 
50905. Chapter 509 directs the FAA to exercise this responsibility 
consistent with public health and safety, safety of property, and the 
national security and foreign policy interests of the United States, 
and to encourage, facilitate, and promote commercial

[[Page 24837]]

space launch and reentry by the private sector. 51 U.S.C. 50905, 50903.
    The Commercial Space Launch Amendments Act of 2004 (CSLAA) assigned 
the FAA responsibility for regulating commercial human space flight. In 
December 2006, the FAA issued human space flight regulations in 
accordance with its authority to protect public health and safety. The 
CSLAA prohibits the FAA from proposing regulations governing the design 
or operation of a launch vehicle to protect the health and safety of 
crew and space flight participants until December 23, 2012, or until a 
design feature or operating practice has resulted in a serious or fatal 
injury, or contributed to an event that posed a high risk of causing a 
death or serious injury, to crew or space flight participants during a 
licensed or permitted commercial human space flight. 51 U.S.C. 
50905(c)(2) and (3). Until such time, the CSLAA only requires that a 
space flight participant be informed of the risks of taking a ride on a 
rocket. 51 U.S.C. 50905(b)(5). The FAA may also issue regulations 
setting reasonable requirements for space flight participants, 
including medical and training requirements. 51 U.S.C. 50905(b)(6).
    Because of recent changes in U.S. policy and the effect they have 
had on the commercial space transportation industry, the FAA is 
planning to propose regulations to protect the health and safety of 
crew and space flight participants for orbital human spaceflight as 
soon as circumstances require after December 23, 2012. This initiative 
is driven by the fact that the National Aeronautics and Space 
Administration (NASA) is planning to contract with the private sector 
to transport NASA astronauts to the International Space Station within 
a few years, and is in the process of developing requirements for its 
procurement of such services. The FAA's role in these flights is still 
in work, but the transport of private individuals to Earth orbit, which 
would require an FAA license, is expected to use the same space 
transportation systems.
    The FAA believes it is important to establish a regulatory 
foundation as early as possible to provide industry assurance that 
systems built to support NASA's missions will be compatible with future 
FAA regulations. The CSLAA mandates that any regulations governing the 
design or operation of a launch vehicle to protect the health and 
safety of crew and space flight participants must take into 
consideration the evolving standards of safety in the commercial space 
flight industry. 51 U.S.C. 50905(c)(3). We fully concur. When 
developed, the proposed regulations are planned to be a starting point 
for a regulatory regime that will evolve over time as the industry 
matures. Moreover, in order to facilitate the development of a 
successful commercial human space transportation industry, the FAA and 
NASA must develop complementary safety regimes for orbital human space 
flight. As noted above, NASA has already begun to develop requirements 
for its procurement of orbital transport services.
    The public meeting will allow a large cross-section of the 
interested public to share views with each other and the FAA, and 
assist the FAA in redefining the regulatory framework for orbital human 
spaceflight. The FAA will share its current philosophy, but is most 
interested in the public's view on a number of regulatory issues such 
as--
     What the appropriate regulatory scope and breadth should 
be,
     What the appropriate mix of performance-based, process-
based, and prescriptive requirements should be,
     What the appropriate level of safety the FAA should target 
with its regulations,
     What, if any, should be the medical requirements for space 
flight participants,
     How best to incorporate government and industry standards 
into the licensing process,
     How much flight testing should be required, and
     How much control over a spacecraft ground personnel and 
flight crew should have.
    Any member of the public may present oral statements at the 
meeting. For planning purposes please inform a person listed in the FOR 
FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT section by May 20, 2011, although we will 
accommodate uncoordinated statements.
    Written comments are also welcome during or after the meeting, but 
must be submitted to the docket by June 9, 2011.
    Privacy: We will post all comments we receive, without change, to 
https://www.regulations.gov, including any personal information you 
provide. Using the search function of the docket web site, anyone can 
find and read the electronic form of all comments received into any of 
our dockets, including the name of the individual sending the comment 
(or signing the comment for an association, business, labor union, 
etc.). You may review the Department of Transportation's complete 
Privacy Act Statement in the Federal Register published on April 11, 
2000, (65 FR 19477-78), or you may visit https://DocketsInfo.dot.gov.
    Docket: To read background documents or comments received, go to 
https://www.regulations.gov at any time and follow the online 
instructions for accessing the docket or Docket Operations in Room W12-
140 of the West Building Ground Floor at 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE., 
Washington, DC, between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, 
except Federal holidays.

    Issued in Washington, DC on April 26, 2011.
George C. Nield,
Associate Administrator for Commercial Space Transportation.
[FR Doc. 2011-10638 Filed 5-2-11; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4910-13-P