Virginia Electric Power Company, LLC, North Anna Power Station, Unit No. 1; Exemption, 23846-23848 [2011-10282]

Download as PDF 23846 Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 82 / Thursday, April 28, 2011 / Notices available online in the NRC Library at http://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/ adams.html. From this page, the public can gain entry into ADAMS, which provides text and image files of the NRC’s public documents. If you do not have access to ADAMS or if there are problems in accessing the documents located in ADAMS, contact the NRC’s PDR reference staff at 1–800–397–4209, 301–415–4737, or by e-mail to pdr.resource@nrc.gov. The Regulatory Analysis is available electronically under ADAMS Accession Number ML103190466. • Federal Rulemaking Web Site: Public comments and supporting materials related to this notice can be found at http://www.regulations.gov by searching on Docket ID NRC–2011– 0096. Comments would be most helpful if received by June 26, 2011. Comments received after that date will be considered if it is practical to do so, but the NRC is able to ensure consideration only for comments received on or before this date. Although a time limit is given, comments and suggestions in connection with items for inclusion in guides currently being developed or improvements in all published guides are encouraged at any time. Electronic copies of DG–1197 are available through the NRC’s public Web site under Draft Regulatory Guides in the ‘‘Regulatory Guides’’ collection of the NRC’s Electronic Reading Room at http://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/doccollections/. Electronic copies are also available in ADAMS (http:// www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/adams.html), under Accession No. ML081560507. Regulatory guides are not copyrighted, and Commission approval is not required to reproduce them. Dated at Rockville, Maryland this 19th day of April, 2011. For the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Harriet Karagiannis, Acting Chief, Regulatory Guide Development Branch, Division of Engineering, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. [FR Doc. 2011–10336 Filed 4–27–11; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 7590–01–P srobinson on DSKHWCL6B1PROD with NOTICES NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket No. 50–338; NRC–2010–0246] Virginia Electric Power Company, LLC, North Anna Power Station, Unit No. 1; Exemption 1.0 Background Virginia Electric Power Company (VEPCO, the licensee) is the holder of VerDate Mar<15>2010 17:01 Apr 27, 2011 Jkt 223001 Facility Operating License No. NPF–4, which authorizes operation of North Anna Power Station (NAPS), Unit No. 1. The license provides, among other things, that the facility is subject to all rules, regulations, and orders of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC, the Commission) now or hereafter in effect. The facility consists of a pressurizedwater reactor located in Louisa County, Virginia. 2.0 Request/Action Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR), Part 50, Section 50.48(b) requires nuclear power plants licensed before January 1, 1979, to meet 10 CFR Part 50, Appendix R, Section III.O. NAPS Unit No. 1 was licensed on April 1, 1978. Appendix R, Section III.O requires a reactor coolant pump (RCP) oil collection system (OCS) that is capable of collecting lube oil from all potential pressurized and unpressurized leakage sites in the reactor coolant pump lube oil system. The licensee requested an exemption from the requirements to the extent that minor oil misting may not be captured within the OCS. This applies to all three Unit 1 RCPs. In summary, by letter dated April 23, 2010 (Agencywide Documents Access and Management System (ADAMS), Accession No. ML101160376), as supplemented by letters dated May 13, 2010 (ADAMS Accession No. ML101380270), October 11, 2010 (ADAMS Accession No. ML102870109), and November 15, 2010 (ADAMS Accession No. ML103200451), the licensee requested an exemption from 10 CFR Part 50, Appendix R, Section III.O because small amounts of oil from the RCP were misting, were being transported by the ventilation system, and were condensing on the RCP motor stator coolers (hereafter referred to as coolers). The exemption would allow the licensee to install features to collect any oil that accumulates on the coolers instead of preventing the oil mist from escaping the OCS. 3.0 Discussion Pursuant to 10 CFR 50.12, the Commission may, upon application by any interested person or upon its own initiative, grant exemptions from the requirements of 10 CFR Part 50 when (1) the exemptions are authorized by law, will not present an undue risk to public health or safety, and are consistent with the common defense and security; and (2) when special circumstances are present. These circumstances include the special circumstances that application of the regulation is not PO 00000 Frm 00060 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 necessary to achieve the underlying purpose of the rule. Authorized by Law This exemption would allow the licensee to install features to collect any oil that accumulates on the coolers from oil mist condensation instead of preventing the oil mist from escaping the OCS. As stated above, 10 CFR 50.12 allows the NRC to grant exemptions from the requirements of 10 CFR Part 50. The NRC staff has determined that granting of the licensee’s proposed exemption will not result in a violation of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, or the Commission’s regulations. Therefore, the exemption is authorized by law. No Undue Risk to Public Health and Safety The underlying purposes of 10 CFR Part 50, Appendix R, Section III.O is to ensure that failure of the RCP lube oil system will not lead to fire during normal or design basis accident conditions and that there is reasonable assurance that the system will withstand the Safe Shutdown Earthquake. The regulation intends licensees to accomplish this by extending the concept of defense-indepth to fire protection in fire areas important to safety, with the following objectives: (1) To prevent fires from starting; (2) To rapidly detect, control, and extinguish promptly those fires that do occur; (3) To provide protection for structures, systems, and components important to safety so that a fire that is not promptly extinguished by the fire suppression activities will not prevent the safe shutdown (SSD) of the plant. In their request, as supplemented, the licensee described elements of their fire protection program that provide their justification that the concept of defensein-depth that is in place in the affected important to safety fire area (FA), FA 1– 1, is consistent with that required by the regulation. The licensee states in their request, as supplemented, that the modification to install oil collection trays on the coolers with piping connected to the RCP OCS is scheduled to be installed during the next Unit 1 refueling outage. Operating experience based on a similar design for Unit 2 has indicated that the oil mist primarily condenses on the coolers and the oil collection tray collects oil dripping from the coolers. This will reduce the potential for significant quantities of oil pooling to occur outside the OCS. The remaining oil sheen that may develop due to misting does not present a safety E:\FR\FM\28APN1.SGM 28APN1 Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 82 / Thursday, April 28, 2011 / Notices srobinson on DSKHWCL6B1PROD with NOTICES concern due to the small volume of oil. The licensee further states in their request, as supplemented, that the purpose of their request was to address expected, minor RCP oil misting. The collection of the oil in the tray below the coolers and the piping to the OCS is in addition to the protective measures installed to meet Section III.O of 10 CFR Part 50, Appendix R. In the licensee’s request, as supplemented, an analysis was provided that described how fire prevention, detection, control, extinguishment and preservation of safe shutdown capability is addressed for FA 1–1 in the Unit 1 containment, as summarized below. Fire Prevention The licensee states that administrative controls are in place to control combustibles in the plant. No transient combustible materials are normally allowed in the containment while the unit is at power. This is ensured by implementing a Unit 1 containment checklist prior to placing the unit into operation. Hot work does not occur within the RCP cubicles during power operations. The RCP cubicles are concrete compartments that are open to the containment on the top and house the RCPs, the steam generators and the reactor coolant system piping. NRC Information Notice 94–58, ‘‘Reactor Coolant Pump Lube Oil Fire’’ (ADAMS Accession No. ML031060498), alerted industry that a credible ignition source for RCP oil is hot RCS piping. Ignition has typically occurred due to the oil soaking fibrous insulation. Inadequately designed oil collection systems and oil leaking onto RCP piping insulation was identified as a cause. The licensee’s April 23, 2010, letter proposes to modify the OCS to further eliminate the potential for oil pooling outside the OCS. The modification will also prevent oil from collecting on three sections of fiberglass cloth covered Tempmat insulation under the RCP motors. Tempmat insulation is noncombustible and is not an Appendix R concern with respect to combustible loading. The licensee states that the modifications to the OCS are scheduled to be installed during the next refueling outage. The licensee states that additional defense-in-depth at NAPS Unit No. 1 is achieved through the physical properties of the oil itself combined with the limited amount of ignition sources within the area. The flashpoint of the oil currently used is 374 °F, with an auto-ignition temperature of 608 °F. Nominal temperatures of the RCP motor and pump flange are approximately 220 VerDate Mar<15>2010 17:01 Apr 27, 2011 Jkt 223001 °F and 550 °F, respectively. These temperatures would not be sufficient to cause auto-ignition of the oil. However, given the flashpoint of the oil, it is conceivable that the oil could be ignited in the presence of an ignition source. A review of equipment in the area has identified one potential ignition source in addition to the RCPs themselves. The RCP is protected from being an ignition source by the installed OCS. The other potential ignition source is the cold leg loop stop valve (LSV) motor operated valve (MOV), which is in close proximity to the RCP. Due to the size of the LSV MOV actuator motor, it could also be considered an ignition source. However, power is removed from the cold leg LSV MOVs by opening the supply breakers prior to startup and administratively verified open throughout the cycle. Therefore, the ignition source is effectively eliminated. In addition, guidance in the ‘‘Station Lubrication Manual’’ outlines the procedural controls that ensure that RCP oil of different properties is not used. The Station Lubrication Manual is procedurally controlled and requires authorization to be changed. With the exception of the oil contained within the RCP motor, combustibles within each cubicle and loop room are negligible. Furthermore, containment is maintained at a subatmospheric pressure and not routinely occupied during operation. As a result, the introduction of transient combustibles into this area at power is negligible. Each RCP motor has a dedicated OCS tank that is designed to contain the entire oil inventory of the motor. A vent and flame arrestor are provided on top of the tank. Operations procedures verify the oil collection tanks are empty prior to unit start-up from Mode 5. In addition, tank drain lines were extended in the mid-1990’s to allow draining the tank from outside the loop rooms (lower radiation dose area). A design change to enhance the baffled ventilation openings of the RCP oil lift pump enclosure that ensures that all oil will be contained in the event of pressurized oil leakage inside these enclosures has been installed on NAPS Unit No. 1. A design change to install oil collection trays on the coolers with piping connected to the RCP OCS tank is scheduled to be installed on NAPS Unit No. 1 during the next refueling outage. This piping will direct the oil in the cooler collection trays to the RCP OCS tank. The oil collection trays will be installed in the areas where the most oil outside the OCS has been found. Prior to installation of the collection PO 00000 Frm 00061 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 23847 trays on NAPS Unit No. 2, licensee staff identified oil pooling under the coolers. Approximately 6 months after the collection trays were installed, a walkdown of NAPS Unit No. 2 RCP A and B verified that the oil collection trays were performing as designed. The licensee states that all preventative maintenance tasks are controlled by established preplanned work orders under the recurring task evaluation (RTE) process. Deferral of any of these work orders will require an RTE that will be evaluated by VEPCO on a case-by-case basis. The licensee states that they follow the manufacturer’s recommendations for maintenance of the RCPs and that the RCPs are refurbished every 9 years by an offsite vendor. Detection, Control and Extinguishment Fire detection within the NAPS Unit Nos. 1 and 2 containment consists of linear heat detection on each RCP, smoke and heat detection within the cable penetration area of containment, heat detection for the residual heat removal pumps, and duct smoke detection on the outlet of each of the three containment air recirculation fans. The RCP linear heat detection alarms at 575 °F. The alarm is received locally in containment at the local control panel, on the control room vertical board, and on the control room fire detection panel. System trouble conditions are annunciated similarly. Manual fire suppression equipment for containment consists of a 100 lb.wheeled CO2 unit on each floor of containment, three CO2 and one dry chemical extinguisher at the personnel entrance to containment, and a dry standpipe system with hose stations. Hoses are not normally connected to the hose valves. A fire brigade equipment locker is provided outside of the personnel entrance to containment. The licensee states that the CO2 extinguishers and the dry chemical extinguisher are rated for a Class B fire (flammable and combustible liquids). The initial fire fighting attack can be made using either a CO2 or dry chemical extinguisher. A fire hose can be used if CO2 is ineffective or does not completely extinguish the fire. In addition, foam is available and can be applied if determined necessary by the fire brigade. Preservation of Safe Shutdown Capability The licensee states that FA 1–1 is the primary containment for NAPS Unit No. 1. The area is a multi-level structure. The boundary fire barriers for containment are of heavy reinforced E:\FR\FM\28APN1.SGM 28APN1 23848 Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 82 / Thursday, April 28, 2011 / Notices srobinson on DSKHWCL6B1PROD with NOTICES concrete construction with an inherent fire rating in excess of 3 hours. Access is gained into containment through a personnel access lock. The RCP motor cubicles are located above the associated reactor coolant system loop room. The floor of the RCP motor cubicle consists of steel grating with multiple openings between the motor cubicle and reactor coolant system loop room. The rooms are separated from the remainder of containment by heavy concrete shield walls, with a personnel access door for each cubicle and loop room. There are multiple openings in the ceiling of the motor cubicles. Although not maintained as rated fire boundaries, the heavy shield walls provide a degree of separation. The license states that the only SSD function instruments present are the three resistance temperature detectors (RTDs) that provide indication of the RCS hot leg temperature in the control room. There is no credible means for minor oil misting to impact the safe shutdown function of the hot leg RTDs. Each RTD is separated from the closest redundant RTD located in another pump cubicle by two heavy concrete walls. Therefore, a credible fire in one RCP cubicle would not affect RCS temperature indication from the other two loops. Summary of Defense-in-Depth In summary, the defense-in-depth concept for a fire in FA 1–1 discussed above provides an adequate level of safety through the prevention of fires, detection, control and extinguishment of fires that occur and the protection of structures, systems and components important to safety. As discussed above, the licensee has provided preventative and protective measures that together demonstrate the licensee’s ability to preserve or maintain SSD capability in the event of a fire within an RCP cubicle or reactor coolant system loop room. Based on the above, the NRC staff concludes that the licensee has met the defense-in-depth objectives and no new accident precursors are created by the installation of features to collect any oil that accumulates on the coolers from oil mist condensation instead of preventing the oil mist from escaping the OCS, thus, the probability of postulated accidents is not increased. Also, based on the above, the consequences of postulated accidents are not increased. Therefore, there is no undue risk to public health and safety. Consistent With Common Defense and Security The proposed exemption would allow the licensee to install features to collect VerDate Mar<15>2010 17:01 Apr 27, 2011 Jkt 223001 any oil that accumulates on the coolers from oil mist condensation instead of preventing the oil mist from escaping the OCS. This change to the plant has no relation to security issues. Therefore, the common defense and security is not impacted by this exemption. Special Circumstances Special circumstances, in accordance with 10 CFR 50.12(a)(2)(ii), are present whenever application of the regulation in the particular circumstances is not necessary to achieve the underlying purpose of the rule. The underlying purposes of 10 CFR Part 50, Appendix R, Section III.O is to ensure that failure of the RCP lube oil system will not lead to fire during normal or design basis accident conditions and that there is reasonable assurance that the system will withstand the Safe Shutdown Earthquake. As described above, the defense-in-depth concept for a fire in FA 1–1 discussed above provides an adequate level of safety through prevention of fires, detection, control and extinguishment of fires that do occur and the protection of structures, systems and components important to safety. In addition, the licensee has provided preventative and protective measures that together demonstrate the ability to preserve or maintain SSD capability in the event of a fire in an RCP cubicle and loop room. Allowing the collection of oil that accumulates on the coolers instead of preventing the oil mist from escaping the OCS does not impact the ability of the OCS to withstand the Safe Shutdown Earthquake. Therefore, since the underlying purpose of 10 CFR Part 50, Appendix R is achieved, the special circumstances required by 10 CFR 50.12(a)(2)(ii) for the granting of an exemption from 10 CFR Part 50, Appendix R exist. 4.0 Conclusion Accordingly, the Commission has determined that, pursuant to 10 CFR 50.12, the exemption is authorized by law, will not present an undue risk to the public health and safety, and is consistent with the common defense and security. Also, special circumstances are present. Therefore, the Commission hereby grants VEPCO an exemption from 10 CFR Part 50, Appendix R, Section III.O to the extent that minor oil misting may not be captured within the OCS. This applies to all three RCPs for NAPS Unit No. 1. Pursuant to 10 CFR 51.32, the Commission has determined that the granting of this exemption will not have a significant effect on the quality of the human environment as published in the PO 00000 Frm 00062 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Federal Register on July 8, 2010 (75 FR 39285). This exemption is effective upon issuance. Dated at Rockville, Maryland this 21st day of April 2011. For the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Robert A. Nelson, Acting Director, Division of Operating Reactor Licensing, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation. [FR Doc. 2011–10282 Filed 4–27–11; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 7590–01–P NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC–2011–0093; Docket No. 50–400] Carolina Power And Light Company; Notice of Withdrawal of Application for Amendment to Renewed Facility Operating License The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC, the Commission) has granted the request of the Carolina Power and Light Company (the licensee) to withdraw its application dated March 28, 2010, as supplemented by letter dated December 9, 2010, for a proposed amendment to Renewed Facility Operating License No. NPF–63 for the Shearon Harris Nuclear Power Plant, Unit 1, located in Wake County, North Carolina. The proposed amendment would have modified revise Technical Specification Section 6.9.1.6 to add the NRC-approved topical report, EMF– 2103(P)(A), Revision 0, ‘‘Realistic LargeBreak LOCA [Loss-of-Coolant Accident] Methodology for Pressurized Water Reactors,’’ to the Core Operating Limits Report methodologies list. This change would have allowed the use of the thermal-hydraulic computer analysis code S–RELAP5 for the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) Chapter 15 realistic large-break LOCA in the Shearon Harris Nuclear Power Plant, Unit 1 safety analyses. Topical Report, EMF–2103(P)(A), Revision 0, was approved by the NRC on April 9, 2003, for the application of the S–RELAP5 thermal-hydraulic analysis computer code to FSAR Chapter 15 realistic largebreak LOCA. The Commission had previously issued a Notice of Consideration of Issuance of Amendment published in the Federal Register on June 8, 2010, (75 FR 32511). However, by letter dated March 28, 2011, the licensee withdrew the proposed change. For further details with respect to this action, see the application for amendment dated March 23, 2010 E:\FR\FM\28APN1.SGM 28APN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 76, Number 82 (Thursday, April 28, 2011)]
[Notices]
[Pages 23846-23848]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2011-10282]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION

[Docket No. 50-338; NRC-2010-0246]


Virginia Electric Power Company, LLC, North Anna Power Station, 
Unit No. 1; Exemption

1.0 Background

    Virginia Electric Power Company (VEPCO, the licensee) is the holder 
of Facility Operating License No. NPF-4, which authorizes operation of 
North Anna Power Station (NAPS), Unit No. 1. The license provides, 
among other things, that the facility is subject to all rules, 
regulations, and orders of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC, the 
Commission) now or hereafter in effect.
    The facility consists of a pressurized-water reactor located in 
Louisa County, Virginia.

2.0 Request/Action

    Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR), Part 50, 
Section 50.48(b) requires nuclear power plants licensed before January 
1, 1979, to meet 10 CFR Part 50, Appendix R, Section III.O. NAPS Unit 
No. 1 was licensed on April 1, 1978. Appendix R, Section III.O requires 
a reactor coolant pump (RCP) oil collection system (OCS) that is 
capable of collecting lube oil from all potential pressurized and 
unpressurized leakage sites in the reactor coolant pump lube oil 
system.
    The licensee requested an exemption from the requirements to the 
extent that minor oil misting may not be captured within the OCS. This 
applies to all three Unit 1 RCPs.
    In summary, by letter dated April 23, 2010 (Agencywide Documents 
Access and Management System (ADAMS), Accession No. ML101160376), as 
supplemented by letters dated May 13, 2010 (ADAMS Accession No. 
ML101380270), October 11, 2010 (ADAMS Accession No. ML102870109), and 
November 15, 2010 (ADAMS Accession No. ML103200451), the licensee 
requested an exemption from 10 CFR Part 50, Appendix R, Section III.O 
because small amounts of oil from the RCP were misting, were being 
transported by the ventilation system, and were condensing on the RCP 
motor stator coolers (hereafter referred to as coolers). The exemption 
would allow the licensee to install features to collect any oil that 
accumulates on the coolers instead of preventing the oil mist from 
escaping the OCS.

3.0 Discussion

    Pursuant to 10 CFR 50.12, the Commission may, upon application by 
any interested person or upon its own initiative, grant exemptions from 
the requirements of 10 CFR Part 50 when (1) the exemptions are 
authorized by law, will not present an undue risk to public health or 
safety, and are consistent with the common defense and security; and 
(2) when special circumstances are present. These circumstances include 
the special circumstances that application of the regulation is not 
necessary to achieve the underlying purpose of the rule.

Authorized by Law

    This exemption would allow the licensee to install features to 
collect any oil that accumulates on the coolers from oil mist 
condensation instead of preventing the oil mist from escaping the OCS. 
As stated above, 10 CFR 50.12 allows the NRC to grant exemptions from 
the requirements of 10 CFR Part 50. The NRC staff has determined that 
granting of the licensee's proposed exemption will not result in a 
violation of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, or the 
Commission's regulations. Therefore, the exemption is authorized by 
law.

No Undue Risk to Public Health and Safety

    The underlying purposes of 10 CFR Part 50, Appendix R, Section 
III.O is to ensure that failure of the RCP lube oil system will not 
lead to fire during normal or design basis accident conditions and that 
there is reasonable assurance that the system will withstand the Safe 
Shutdown Earthquake. The regulation intends licensees to accomplish 
this by extending the concept of defense-in-depth to fire protection in 
fire areas important to safety, with the following objectives:
    (1) To prevent fires from starting;
    (2) To rapidly detect, control, and extinguish promptly those fires 
that do occur;
    (3) To provide protection for structures, systems, and components 
important to safety so that a fire that is not promptly extinguished by 
the fire suppression activities will not prevent the safe shutdown 
(SSD) of the plant.
    In their request, as supplemented, the licensee described elements 
of their fire protection program that provide their justification that 
the concept of defense-in-depth that is in place in the affected 
important to safety fire area (FA), FA 1-1, is consistent with that 
required by the regulation. The licensee states in their request, as 
supplemented, that the modification to install oil collection trays on 
the coolers with piping connected to the RCP OCS is scheduled to be 
installed during the next Unit 1 refueling outage. Operating experience 
based on a similar design for Unit 2 has indicated that the oil mist 
primarily condenses on the coolers and the oil collection tray collects 
oil dripping from the coolers. This will reduce the potential for 
significant quantities of oil pooling to occur outside the OCS. The 
remaining oil sheen that may develop due to misting does not present a 
safety

[[Page 23847]]

concern due to the small volume of oil. The licensee further states in 
their request, as supplemented, that the purpose of their request was 
to address expected, minor RCP oil misting. The collection of the oil 
in the tray below the coolers and the piping to the OCS is in addition 
to the protective measures installed to meet Section III.O of 10 CFR 
Part 50, Appendix R.
    In the licensee's request, as supplemented, an analysis was 
provided that described how fire prevention, detection, control, 
extinguishment and preservation of safe shutdown capability is 
addressed for FA 1-1 in the Unit 1 containment, as summarized below.

Fire Prevention

    The licensee states that administrative controls are in place to 
control combustibles in the plant. No transient combustible materials 
are normally allowed in the containment while the unit is at power. 
This is ensured by implementing a Unit 1 containment checklist prior to 
placing the unit into operation. Hot work does not occur within the RCP 
cubicles during power operations. The RCP cubicles are concrete 
compartments that are open to the containment on the top and house the 
RCPs, the steam generators and the reactor coolant system piping.
    NRC Information Notice 94-58, ``Reactor Coolant Pump Lube Oil 
Fire'' (ADAMS Accession No. ML031060498), alerted industry that a 
credible ignition source for RCP oil is hot RCS piping. Ignition has 
typically occurred due to the oil soaking fibrous insulation. 
Inadequately designed oil collection systems and oil leaking onto RCP 
piping insulation was identified as a cause.
    The licensee's April 23, 2010, letter proposes to modify the OCS to 
further eliminate the potential for oil pooling outside the OCS. The 
modification will also prevent oil from collecting on three sections of 
fiberglass cloth covered Tempmat insulation under the RCP motors. 
Tempmat insulation is noncombustible and is not an Appendix R concern 
with respect to combustible loading. The licensee states that the 
modifications to the OCS are scheduled to be installed during the next 
refueling outage.
    The licensee states that additional defense-in-depth at NAPS Unit 
No. 1 is achieved through the physical properties of the oil itself 
combined with the limited amount of ignition sources within the area. 
The flashpoint of the oil currently used is 374 [deg]F, with an auto-
ignition temperature of 608 [deg]F. Nominal temperatures of the RCP 
motor and pump flange are approximately 220 [deg]F and 550 [deg]F, 
respectively. These temperatures would not be sufficient to cause auto-
ignition of the oil. However, given the flashpoint of the oil, it is 
conceivable that the oil could be ignited in the presence of an 
ignition source. A review of equipment in the area has identified one 
potential ignition source in addition to the RCPs themselves. The RCP 
is protected from being an ignition source by the installed OCS. The 
other potential ignition source is the cold leg loop stop valve (LSV) 
motor operated valve (MOV), which is in close proximity to the RCP. Due 
to the size of the LSV MOV actuator motor, it could also be considered 
an ignition source. However, power is removed from the cold leg LSV 
MOVs by opening the supply breakers prior to startup and 
administratively verified open throughout the cycle. Therefore, the 
ignition source is effectively eliminated. In addition, guidance in the 
``Station Lubrication Manual'' outlines the procedural controls that 
ensure that RCP oil of different properties is not used. The Station 
Lubrication Manual is procedurally controlled and requires 
authorization to be changed.
    With the exception of the oil contained within the RCP motor, 
combustibles within each cubicle and loop room are negligible. 
Furthermore, containment is maintained at a sub-atmospheric pressure 
and not routinely occupied during operation. As a result, the 
introduction of transient combustibles into this area at power is 
negligible.
    Each RCP motor has a dedicated OCS tank that is designed to contain 
the entire oil inventory of the motor. A vent and flame arrestor are 
provided on top of the tank. Operations procedures verify the oil 
collection tanks are empty prior to unit start-up from Mode 5. In 
addition, tank drain lines were extended in the mid-1990's to allow 
draining the tank from outside the loop rooms (lower radiation dose 
area).
    A design change to enhance the baffled ventilation openings of the 
RCP oil lift pump enclosure that ensures that all oil will be contained 
in the event of pressurized oil leakage inside these enclosures has 
been installed on NAPS Unit No. 1.
    A design change to install oil collection trays on the coolers with 
piping connected to the RCP OCS tank is scheduled to be installed on 
NAPS Unit No. 1 during the next refueling outage. This piping will 
direct the oil in the cooler collection trays to the RCP OCS tank. The 
oil collection trays will be installed in the areas where the most oil 
outside the OCS has been found. Prior to installation of the collection 
trays on NAPS Unit No. 2, licensee staff identified oil pooling under 
the coolers. Approximately 6 months after the collection trays were 
installed, a walkdown of NAPS Unit No. 2 RCP A and B verified that the 
oil collection trays were performing as designed.
    The licensee states that all preventative maintenance tasks are 
controlled by established preplanned work orders under the recurring 
task evaluation (RTE) process. Deferral of any of these work orders 
will require an RTE that will be evaluated by VEPCO on a case-by-case 
basis. The licensee states that they follow the manufacturer's 
recommendations for maintenance of the RCPs and that the RCPs are 
refurbished every 9 years by an offsite vendor.

Detection, Control and Extinguishment

    Fire detection within the NAPS Unit Nos. 1 and 2 containment 
consists of linear heat detection on each RCP, smoke and heat detection 
within the cable penetration area of containment, heat detection for 
the residual heat removal pumps, and duct smoke detection on the outlet 
of each of the three containment air recirculation fans. The RCP linear 
heat detection alarms at 575 [deg]F. The alarm is received locally in 
containment at the local control panel, on the control room vertical 
board, and on the control room fire detection panel. System trouble 
conditions are annunciated similarly.
    Manual fire suppression equipment for containment consists of a 100 
lb.-wheeled CO2 unit on each floor of containment, three 
CO2 and one dry chemical extinguisher at the personnel 
entrance to containment, and a dry standpipe system with hose stations. 
Hoses are not normally connected to the hose valves. A fire brigade 
equipment locker is provided outside of the personnel entrance to 
containment.
    The licensee states that the CO2 extinguishers and the 
dry chemical extinguisher are rated for a Class B fire (flammable and 
combustible liquids). The initial fire fighting attack can be made 
using either a CO2 or dry chemical extinguisher. A fire hose 
can be used if CO2 is ineffective or does not completely 
extinguish the fire. In addition, foam is available and can be applied 
if determined necessary by the fire brigade.

Preservation of Safe Shutdown Capability

    The licensee states that FA 1-1 is the primary containment for NAPS 
Unit No. 1. The area is a multi-level structure. The boundary fire 
barriers for containment are of heavy reinforced

[[Page 23848]]

concrete construction with an inherent fire rating in excess of 3 
hours. Access is gained into containment through a personnel access 
lock. The RCP motor cubicles are located above the associated reactor 
coolant system loop room. The floor of the RCP motor cubicle consists 
of steel grating with multiple openings between the motor cubicle and 
reactor coolant system loop room. The rooms are separated from the 
remainder of containment by heavy concrete shield walls, with a 
personnel access door for each cubicle and loop room. There are 
multiple openings in the ceiling of the motor cubicles. Although not 
maintained as rated fire boundaries, the heavy shield walls provide a 
degree of separation.
    The license states that the only SSD function instruments present 
are the three resistance temperature detectors (RTDs) that provide 
indication of the RCS hot leg temperature in the control room. There is 
no credible means for minor oil misting to impact the safe shutdown 
function of the hot leg RTDs. Each RTD is separated from the closest 
redundant RTD located in another pump cubicle by two heavy concrete 
walls. Therefore, a credible fire in one RCP cubicle would not affect 
RCS temperature indication from the other two loops.

Summary of Defense-in-Depth

    In summary, the defense-in-depth concept for a fire in FA 1-1 
discussed above provides an adequate level of safety through the 
prevention of fires, detection, control and extinguishment of fires 
that occur and the protection of structures, systems and components 
important to safety. As discussed above, the licensee has provided 
preventative and protective measures that together demonstrate the 
licensee's ability to preserve or maintain SSD capability in the event 
of a fire within an RCP cubicle or reactor coolant system loop room.
    Based on the above, the NRC staff concludes that the licensee has 
met the defense-in-depth objectives and no new accident precursors are 
created by the installation of features to collect any oil that 
accumulates on the coolers from oil mist condensation instead of 
preventing the oil mist from escaping the OCS, thus, the probability of 
postulated accidents is not increased. Also, based on the above, the 
consequences of postulated accidents are not increased. Therefore, 
there is no undue risk to public health and safety.

Consistent With Common Defense and Security

    The proposed exemption would allow the licensee to install features 
to collect any oil that accumulates on the coolers from oil mist 
condensation instead of preventing the oil mist from escaping the OCS. 
This change to the plant has no relation to security issues. Therefore, 
the common defense and security is not impacted by this exemption.

Special Circumstances

    Special circumstances, in accordance with 10 CFR 50.12(a)(2)(ii), 
are present whenever application of the regulation in the particular 
circumstances is not necessary to achieve the underlying purpose of the 
rule. The underlying purposes of 10 CFR Part 50, Appendix R, Section 
III.O is to ensure that failure of the RCP lube oil system will not 
lead to fire during normal or design basis accident conditions and that 
there is reasonable assurance that the system will withstand the Safe 
Shutdown Earthquake. As described above, the defense-in-depth concept 
for a fire in FA 1-1 discussed above provides an adequate level of 
safety through prevention of fires, detection, control and 
extinguishment of fires that do occur and the protection of structures, 
systems and components important to safety. In addition, the licensee 
has provided preventative and protective measures that together 
demonstrate the ability to preserve or maintain SSD capability in the 
event of a fire in an RCP cubicle and loop room. Allowing the 
collection of oil that accumulates on the coolers instead of preventing 
the oil mist from escaping the OCS does not impact the ability of the 
OCS to withstand the Safe Shutdown Earthquake. Therefore, since the 
underlying purpose of 10 CFR Part 50, Appendix R is achieved, the 
special circumstances required by 10 CFR 50.12(a)(2)(ii) for the 
granting of an exemption from 10 CFR Part 50, Appendix R exist.

4.0 Conclusion

    Accordingly, the Commission has determined that, pursuant to 10 CFR 
50.12, the exemption is authorized by law, will not present an undue 
risk to the public health and safety, and is consistent with the common 
defense and security. Also, special circumstances are present. 
Therefore, the Commission hereby grants VEPCO an exemption from 10 CFR 
Part 50, Appendix R, Section III.O to the extent that minor oil misting 
may not be captured within the OCS. This applies to all three RCPs for 
NAPS Unit No. 1. Pursuant to 10 CFR 51.32, the Commission has 
determined that the granting of this exemption will not have a 
significant effect on the quality of the human environment as published 
in the Federal Register on July 8, 2010 (75 FR 39285).
    This exemption is effective upon issuance.

    Dated at Rockville, Maryland this 21st day of April 2011.

    For the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.
Robert A. Nelson,
Acting Director, Division of Operating Reactor Licensing, Office of 
Nuclear Reactor Regulation.
[FR Doc. 2011-10282 Filed 4-27-11; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 7590-01-P