Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Indian Affairs, Washington, DC, and University of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human Remains Repository, Laramie, WY, 14062-14063 [2011-5856]

Download as PDF 14062 Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 50 / Tuesday, March 15, 2011 / Notices srobinson on DSKHWCL6B1PROD with NOTICES These remains and other materials were catalogued as 9248 within the Crane Collection. The majority of the Crane American Indian Collection was accessioned into the collections with the same catalogue number assigned by the Cranes, but preceded by AC. However, the human remains and other material excavated from Plantation Key, FL, were accessioned into the archeology collection as A558 instead of AC.9248. It appears that the human remains were stored in a separate box within the rest of the archeological material from the Plantation Key excavation. In 1998, that box was removed from the archeology collections and assigned catalogue number AC.9248. The contents of the box were sorted into two distinct groups, the human remains and 100 associated funerary objects. Several hundred objects from the Plantation Key excavation remain in the archeology collections and are still catalogued as A558, and the museum is working in consultation with the Miccosukee Tribe of Indians of Florida to deaccession the remaining portion of the Plantation Key and DuPont Plaza materials (DMNS catalogue number A558). Determinations Made by the Denver Museum of Nature & Science Officials of the Denver Museum of Nature & Science have determined that: • Based on non-destructive physical analysis and catalogue records, the human remains are Native American. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), a relationship of shared group identity cannot be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and any present-day Indian tribe. • According to final judgments of the Indian Claims Commission, the land from which the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects were removed is the aboriginal land of the Seminole Nation of Oklahoma and the Seminole Tribe of Florida (Dania, Big Cypress, Brighton, Hollywood & Tampa Reservations). • Multiple lines of evidence, including treaties, Acts of Congress, and Executive Orders, indicate that the land from which the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects were removed is the aboriginal land of the Miccosukee Tribe of Indians of Florida and the Seminole Tribe of Florida (Dania, Big Cypress, Brighton, Hollywood & Tampa Reservations). • Other credible lines of evidence, obtained through consultation with tribal representatives, indicate that the land from which the Native American human remains and associated funerary VerDate Mar<15>2010 16:50 Mar 14, 2011 Jkt 223001 objects were removed is the aboriginal land of The Tribes. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described in this notice represent the physical remains of three individuals of Native American ancestry. • Pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 106 objects described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. • Pursuant to 43 CFR 10.11(c)(1), the disposition of the human remains is to The Tribes. Additional Requestors and Disposition Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains or any other Indian tribe that believes it satisfies the criteria in 43 CFR 10.11(c)(1) should contact Dr. Chip Colwell-Chanthaphonh, Denver Museum of Nature & Science, 2001 Colorado Blvd., Denver, CO 80205, telephone (303) 370–6378, before April 14, 2011. Disposition of the human remains and associated funerary objects to The Tribes may proceed after that date if no additional requestors come forward. The Denver Museum of Nature & Science is responsible for notifying The Tribes that this notice has been published. Dated: March 9, 2011. Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2011–5857 Filed 3–14–11; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [2253–665] Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Indian Affairs, Washington, DC, and University of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human Remains Repository, Laramie, WY National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects in the control of the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Indian Affairs, Washington, DC, and in the possession of the University of Wyoming, PO 00000 Frm 00095 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Anthropology Department, Human Remains Repository, Laramie, WY. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from within the boundaries of the Crow Reservation, Yellowstone County, MT. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by University of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human Remains Repository, professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Crow Tribe of Montana. In the 1930s or early 1940s, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were removed from a rock walled burial cyst by members of the Montana Archaeological Survey on the Crow Reservation, Yellowstone County, MT. The remains have been at the University of Wyoming since the 1960s, but possibly earlier (HR015). No known individual was identified. The two associated funerary objects are one small glass trade bead and a fragment of cloth. Human Remains Repository notes indicate that the burial was associated with other burial cysts and probably dates after the 1860s. The University of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human Remains Repository, determined that the human remains are Native American based on cranial morphology and tooth form. Based on the notes and the burial location, officials of the Human Remains Repository reasonably believe that the remains represent an individual related to the Crow Tribe of Montana. The Crow Tribe presented evidence that showed the burial location is within their tribal homeland as defined by the Treaty of Fort Laramie (1851), Indian Claims Commission (3 Ind. Cls. Comm. 147), and U.S. Court of Claims (284 F.2c 361 (1960)). Officials of the Bureau of Indian Affairs and the University of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human Remains Repository, have determined, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), that the human remains described above represent the physical remains of one individual of Native American ancestry. Officials of the Bureau of Indian Affairs and the University of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human Remains Repository, have also E:\FR\FM\15MRN1.SGM 15MRN1 Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 50 / Tuesday, March 15, 2011 / Notices determined, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), that the two objects described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of a death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials of the Bureau of Indian Affairs and the University of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human Remains Repository, have determined, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), that there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and the Crow Tribe of Montana. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary objects should contact Rick L. Weathermon, NAGPRA Contact at the University of Wyoming, Department 3431, Anthropology, 1000 E. University Ave., Laramie, WY 82071, telephone (307) 766–5136, before April 14, 2011. Repatriation of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Crow Tribe of Montana may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The University of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human Remains Repository, is responsible for notifying the Crow Tribe of Montana that this notice has been published. Dated: March 9, 2011. Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2011–5856 Filed 3–14–11; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–P Disposition of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Indian tribe stated below may occur if no additional requestors come forward. Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes it has a cultural affiliation with the human remains and associated funerary objects should contact the University of Colorado Museum at the address below by April 14, 2011. DATES: Steve Lekson, Curator of Anthropology, University of Colorado Museum, in care of Jan Bernstein, NAGPRA Consultant, Bernstein & Associates, 1041 Lafayette St., Denver, CO 80218, telephone (303) 894–0648. ADDRESSES: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects in the possession of the University of Colorado Museum, Boulder, CO. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from Catron, Grant, Lea, and Otero Counties, NM. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3) and 43 CFR 10.11(d). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Consultation National Park Service A detailed assessment of the human remains and associated funerary objects was made by University of Colorado Museum professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Fort Sill Apache Tribe of Oklahoma; Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Mescalero Apache Tribe of the Mescalero Reservation, New Mexico; Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; Pueblo of Laguna, New Mexico; Pueblo of Zia, New Mexico; San Carlos Apache of the San Carlos Reservation, Arizona; White Mountain Apache Tribe of the Fort Apache Reservation, Arizona; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico. There are no objections by the Indian tribes whose aboriginal lands are within Catron, Grant, Lea, and Otero Counties, NM, and all tribes agree to the disposition of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico. [2253–665] Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Colorado Museum, Boulder, CO National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: The University of Colorado Museum has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes, and has determined that there is no cultural affiliation between the remains and any present-day Indian tribe. Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary objects may contact the University of Colorado Museum. srobinson on DSKHWCL6B1PROD with NOTICES SUMMARY: VerDate Mar<15>2010 16:50 Mar 14, 2011 Jkt 223001 PO 00000 Frm 00096 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 14063 History and Description of the Remains In 1962, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were removed from Catron County, NM, by an unknown individual. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. The remains of this individual are five teeth. At least one tooth suggests the use of teeth as tools and is consistent with an archeological Native American diet. The remains may have been removed from the Gila National Forest or the Gila Cliff Dwellings National Monument both of which are within Catron County, but due to lack of sufficient evidence, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, deferred NAGPRA compliance responsibility to the University of Colorado Museum. On an unknown date, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were removed from Silver City, Grant County, NM, by an unknown individual. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. The remains of this individual are two teeth. The morphology of one tooth and the wear of at least one tooth are consistent with an archeological Native American diet. In 1901, the remains were purchased by Jesse H. Sherman, in Silver City, NM. In 1939, the remains were donated to the museum by Mrs. J.H. Sherman. On an unknown date, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were removed from the Tomas Dominquez Ranch, three quarters of a mile north of Gila, Grant County, NM, by Mrs. Marilyn Moore. No known individual was identified. The three associated funerary objects are a ceramic bowl, a ceramic jar, and one lot of stone flakes. The ceramic jar contains lightly charred/burned bones, as well as a handful of bone dust, and the stone flakes. The bowl was the lid for the ceramic jar and is decorated with a brown and white geometric design. The remains are Mogollon based on the associated funerary objects. The human remains and associated funerary objects were bequeathed to the museum in January 1974. On an unknown date, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were removed from 29LE1, Lea County, NM, by an unknown individual. No known individual was identified. The three associated funerary objects are one lot of shell beads, a projectile point, and a possible pendant made of stone or a marine-type of material. The remains are three teeth. The remains are likely Native American E:\FR\FM\15MRN1.SGM 15MRN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 76, Number 50 (Tuesday, March 15, 2011)]
[Notices]
[Pages 14062-14063]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2011-5856]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[2253-665]


Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of the Interior, 
Bureau of Indian Affairs, Washington, DC, and University of Wyoming, 
Anthropology Department, Human Remains Repository, Laramie, WY

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

    Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves 
Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the 
completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary 
objects in the control of the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau 
of Indian Affairs, Washington, DC, and in the possession of the 
University of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human Remains 
Repository, Laramie, WY. The human remains and associated funerary 
objects were removed from within the boundaries of the Crow 
Reservation, Yellowstone County, MT.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The 
determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National 
Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by University 
of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human Remains Repository, 
professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Crow 
Tribe of Montana.
    In the 1930s or early 1940s, human remains representing a minimum 
of one individual were removed from a rock walled burial cyst by 
members of the Montana Archaeological Survey on the Crow Reservation, 
Yellowstone County, MT. The remains have been at the University of 
Wyoming since the 1960s, but possibly earlier (HR015). No known 
individual was identified. The two associated funerary objects are one 
small glass trade bead and a fragment of cloth.
    Human Remains Repository notes indicate that the burial was 
associated with other burial cysts and probably dates after the 1860s. 
The University of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human Remains 
Repository, determined that the human remains are Native American based 
on cranial morphology and tooth form. Based on the notes and the burial 
location, officials of the Human Remains Repository reasonably believe 
that the remains represent an individual related to the Crow Tribe of 
Montana. The Crow Tribe presented evidence that showed the burial 
location is within their tribal homeland as defined by the Treaty of 
Fort Laramie (1851), Indian Claims Commission (3 Ind. Cls. Comm. 147), 
and U.S. Court of Claims (284 F.2c 361 (1960)).
    Officials of the Bureau of Indian Affairs and the University of 
Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human Remains Repository, have 
determined, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), that the human remains 
described above represent the physical remains of one individual of 
Native American ancestry. Officials of the Bureau of Indian Affairs and 
the University of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human Remains 
Repository, have also

[[Page 14063]]

determined, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), that the two objects 
described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or 
near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of 
a death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials of the Bureau of Indian 
Affairs and the University of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human 
Remains Repository, have determined, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), 
that there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be 
reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and 
associated funerary objects and the Crow Tribe of Montana.
    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary 
objects should contact Rick L. Weathermon, NAGPRA Contact at the 
University of Wyoming, Department 3431, Anthropology, 1000 E. 
University Ave., Laramie, WY 82071, telephone (307) 766-5136, before 
April 14, 2011. Repatriation of the human remains and associated 
funerary objects to the Crow Tribe of Montana may proceed after that 
date if no additional claimants come forward.
    The University of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human Remains 
Repository, is responsible for notifying the Crow Tribe of Montana that 
this notice has been published.

    Dated: March 9, 2011.
Sherry Hutt,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2011-5856 Filed 3-14-11; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-P