Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, Philadelphia, PA, 9049-9051 [2011-3520]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 32 / Wednesday, February 16, 2011 / Notices clarifications were made to the final CCP where we determined it would be appropriate. DATES: Selected Alternative After considering the comments we received, we have selected Alternative 2 for implementation. By implementing Alternative 2, we will protect, maintain, and, where feasible, restore habitat for dusky Canada geese, other waterfowl, and imperiled species. We will maintain high-quality green forage in pastures and wet meadows, and increase cropland and wet meadow acreage. Wetlands will be managed to increase productivity and reduce pumping costs. Invasive species and noxious weeds will continue to be a primary management concern. Enhancing and restoring bottomland forest and oak woodland habitats will increase. We will complete habitat assessments to guide stream and tidally influenced wetland restorations. We will conduct feasibility studies for reintroducing native species such as Columbian white-tailed deer and western pond turtle, and inventory and monitoring efforts will increase. Current public use areas and closures will continue, the waterfowl hunt area will remain unchanged, and changes in wetland management will improve the hunt program over time. A new access point to the River ‘S’ Unit will be developed. The existing auto tour route will be open year round, and shortened slightly, to provide habitat for dusky Canada geese and cranes. A new diketop walking trail will be constructed. Environmental and cultural education and interpretation programs will increase. ADDRESSES: Dated: December 20, 2010. Richard R. Hannan, Acting Regional Director, Region 1, Portland, Oregon. Protests of the survey must be filed before March 18, 2011 to be considered. Protests of the survey should be sent to Branch of Cadastral Survey, Bureau of Land Management, 5001 Southgate Drive, Billings, Montana 59101–4669. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Josh Alexander, Cadastral Surveyor, Branch of Cadastral Survey, Bureau of Land Management, 5001 Southgate Drive, Billings, Montana 59101–4669, telephone (406) 896–5123 or (406) 896– 5009. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: This survey was executed at the request of the Bureau of Land Management, Dillon Field Office, and was necessary to determine federal interest lands. The lands we surveyed are: Principal Meridian, Montana T. 2 S., R. 3 W. The plat, in one sheet, representing the dependent resurvey of Mineral Survey No. 5856B, Charity Mill Site and Supplemental Plat, Township 2 South, Range 3 West, Principal Meridian, Montana, was accepted January 27, 2011. We will place a copy of the plat, in one sheet, in the open files. It will be available to the public as a matter of information. If the BLM receives a protest against this survey, as shown on this plat, in one sheet, prior to the date of the official filing, we will stay the filing pending our consideration of the protest. We will not officially file this plat, in one sheet, until the day after we have accepted or dismissed all protests and they have become final, including decisions or appeals. Authority: 43 U.S.C. Chap. 3. BILLING CODE 4310–55–P Dated: February 9, 2011. James D. Claflin, Chief Cadastral Surveyor, Division of Resources. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR [FR Doc. 2011–3544 Filed 2–15–11; 8:45 am] [FR Doc. 2011–3540 Filed 2–15–11; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4310–$$–P Bureau of Land Management In accordance with the Federal Land Policy and Management Act (FLPMA) and the Federal Advisory Committee Act of 1972 (FACA), the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Eastern Montana Resource Advisory Council (RAC), will meet as indicated below. DATES: The next regular meeting of the Eastern Montana Resource Advisory Council will be held on Mar. 24, 2011 in Miles City, Montana. The meeting will start at 8:00 a.m. and adjourn at approximately 3:30 p.m. ADDRESSES: When determined, the meeting location will be announced in a news release. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mark Jacobsen, Public Affairs Specialist, BLM Eastern Montana/Dakotas District, 111 Garryowen Road, Miles City, Montana 59301. Telephone: (406) 233– 2831. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The 15member Council advises the Secretary of the Interior through the Bureau of Land Management on a variety of planning and management issues associated with public land management in Montana. At these meetings, topics will include: Miles City and Billings Field Office manager updates, subcommittee briefings, work sessions and other issues that the council may raise. All meetings are open to the public and the public may present written comments to the Council. Each formal Council meeting will also have time allocated for hearing public comments. Depending on the number of persons wishing to comment and time available, the time for individual oral comments may be limited. Individuals who plan to attend and need special assistance, such as sign language interpretation, tour transportation or other reasonable accommodations should contact the BLM as provided above. SUMMARY: Dated: February 8, 2011. M. Elaine Raper, Manager, Eastern Montana—Dakotas District. [FR Doc. 2011–3545 Filed 2–15–11; 8:45 am] [LLMT926000–11–L14200000–BJ0000] DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Notice of Filing of Plats of Survey; Montana Bureau of Land Management AGENCY: mstockstill on DSKH9S0YB1PROD with NOTICES 9049 Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of filing of plats of survey. Notice of Public Meeting, Eastern Montana Resource Advisory Council Meeting The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) will file the plat of survey of the lands described below in the BLM Montana State Office, Billings, Montana, on March 18, 2011. SUMMARY: VerDate Mar<15>2010 17:10 Feb 15, 2011 Jkt 223001 [LLMTC 00900.L16100000.DP0000] Bureau of Land Management, Interior, Montana, Billings and Miles City Field Offices. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. AGENCY: PO 00000 Frm 00054 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 BILLING CODE 4310–DN–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [2253–65] Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, Philadelphia, PA AGENCY: E:\FR\FM\16FEN1.SGM National Park Service, Interior. 16FEN1 9050 mstockstill on DSKH9S0YB1PROD with NOTICES ACTION: Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 32 / Wednesday, February 16, 2011 / Notices Notice. Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate cultural items in the possession of the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, Philadelphia, PA, that meet the definitions of sacred objects and/or objects of cultural patrimony under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the cultural items. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. In this notice there are eight Tlingit objects that were purchased by Louis Shotridge, a Tlingit curator employed by the University of Pennsylvania Museum to conduct research and make museum collections. Tlingit objects affiliated with the Tlingit Kaagwaantaan Clan of Sitka, AK, are two helmets (catalog numbers NA8507 and 29–1–1) and three hats (catalog numbers NA6864, NA11741, and NA11742). The remaining three objects affiliated with ´ the Tlingit L’ooknax.adi Clan of Sitka, AK, are one helmet (catalog number NA8502) and two hats (catalog numbers NA10512 and NA10511). The following five cultural objects are affiliated with the Tlingit Kaagwaantaan Clan of Sitka, AK, as indicated through museum records, and through evidence presented by the Central Council of Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska, a Federally-recognized Indian tribe, acting on behalf of the Kaagwaantaan Clan of Sitka, AK. The first cultural item is a helmet called Wolf (NA8507). It is carved of wood and represents a wolf, and is painted with green, red, black, and white pigment. Natural wolf fur, ears and teeth make the helmet more realistic. Red cloth is added to the mouth to represent a tongue, and a white ermine skin is attached to the back of the helmet. The helmet measures approximately 38.5 cm long, 16.5 cm wide, and 16 cm high. In 1918, Louis Shotridge purchased the Wolf Helmet (NA8507) as part of a collection of five objects referred to as the ‘‘Eagle’s Nest House Collection,’’ for $40.00 in Sitka, AK, for the collections of the University of Pennsylvania Museum. The second cultural item is a hat called Ganook (NA6864). It is made of maple wood in the shape of a bird’s face VerDate Mar<15>2010 17:10 Feb 15, 2011 Jkt 223001 and beak, and painted with blue, red, and black pigment. Opercula shell is inlaid for teeth, and the helmet is also decorated with red and white hair. Four potlatch rings woven of split spruce roots are mounted on the top. The hat measures approximately 28 cm long, 27 cm wide, and 37 cm high. The old hat represents Ganook, a petrel, also known as the most ancient being in Tlingit mythology. In 1925, Louis Shotridge purchased the Ganook Hat (NA6864) for $450.00 from a Tlingit individual, Augustus Bean (Ke.t-xut’.tc), a housemaster of one of the three Wolf Houses of the Kaagwaantaan Clan of Sitka, AK, for the collections of the University of Pennsylvania Museum. The third cultural item is a hat called Noble Killer (NA11741). It represents a whale and is carved from one piece of spruce wood, ornamented with abalone shell. The hat is intricately carved and painted with greenish-blue, red, and black pigment. A wooden piece projecting from the back represents the dorsal fin of the animal. Human hair is used as ornamentation on the fin. The hat measures approximately 36 cm long, 34 cm wide, and 27.5 cm high. Museum documentation indicates the Noble Killer Hat (NA11741) represents the maritime power of the Kaagwaantaan clan. The fourth cultural item is a hat called Eagle (NA11742). It is carved, in one piece, from the root of the red cedar, and is painted with greenish-blue, red, black, and white pigment. The hat is decorated with coarse, grayish-brown human hair. Designs carved on the sides, some of which are inlaid with abalone shell, represent the wings. Designs on the front part of the hat represent the eagle’s legs and talons. The hat measures approximately 33 cm long, 25.5 cm wide, and 26 cm high. The Eagle Hat represents the Eagle moiety of the Tlingit nation. In 1926, Louis Shotridge purchased the Noble Killer (or Noble Killerwhale) Hat (NA11741) and the Eagle Hat (NA11742) from a Tlingit individual, Augustus Bean (Ke.t-xut’.tc), a housemaster for one of the three Wolf Houses of the Kaagwaantaan Clan of Sitka, AK. These two hats, together with a third hat, were acquired by Louis Shotridge for $800.00. The fifth cultural item is a helmet called Shark (29–1–1). It is made of walrus hide, and has visible interior supports made of wood. The helmet is carved and painted with greenish-blue, red, and black pigment, and includes abalone shell eyes and mouth, and opercula shell teeth. The nose of the shark is covered by an arched frame made of carved and painted walrus PO 00000 Frm 00055 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 hide, decorated with hair. The helmet measures approximately 38 cm long, 40.5 cm wide, and 48.5 cm high. According to museum documentation, it is an old object that is associated with the founding of the Kaagwaantaan clan. In 1929, Louis Shotridge purchased the Shark Helmet (29–1–1) for $350.00 from a Tlingit individual of the Kaagwaantaan clan for the collections of the University of Pennsylvania Museum. Based on consultation, museum documentation, anthropological literature, and expert opinion, one cultural item is considered to be a sacred object (Wolf Helmet, NA8507), one is considered to be an object of cultural patrimony (Shark Helmet, 29– 1–1), and three are considered to be both sacred objects and objects of cultural patrimony (Ganook Hat, NA6864; Noble Killer Hat, NA11741; Eagle Hat, NA11742). The remaining three cultural objects are affiliated with the Tlingit ´ L’ooknax.adi Clan of Sitka, AK, as indicated through museum records, and through evidence presented by the Central Council of Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska, a Federallyrecognized Indian tribe, acting on behalf ´ of the Tlingit L’ooknax.adi Clan of Sitka, AK. The first cultural item affiliated with ´ the L’ooknax.adi Clan of Sitka, AK, is a helmet called Barbecuing Raven (NA8502). It is carved out of wood in the shape of a large raven with a wide flat tail, talons, and a second face underneath the raven’s beak at the front. The wings are made of painted hide. The helmet is painted with blue-green, red, and black pigment and it is decorated with copper, and a few remaining remnants of puffin beaks. Two potlatch rings woven of split spruce roots are mounted on the top, decorated with a single ermine skin. The helmet measures approximately 49 cm long, 38 cm wide, and 30 cm high. In 1918, Louis Shotridge purchased the Barbecuing Raven Helmet (NA8502) as part of a collection of five objects, referred to as the ‘‘Sealion House Collection,’’ for $360.00, in Sitka, AK, for the collections of the University of Pennsylvania Museum. The second cultural item is a hat called Whale (catalog number NA10512). It is a basketry hat, woven of spruce tree roots, which has been painted white. A design representing a whale with an open mouth is painted in black pigment. A carved wooden element secured to the top of the hat represents the whale’s dorsal fin, and includes a face painted with blue-green, red, black and white pigment, abalone E:\FR\FM\16FEN1.SGM 16FEN1 mstockstill on DSKH9S0YB1PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 32 / Wednesday, February 16, 2011 / Notices shell teeth and eyes, and human hair. The helmet measures approximately 39 cm long, 35 cm wide, and 36 cm high. The third cultural item is a hat called Raven of the Roof (NA10511). It is carved and painted with blue-green, red, black and white pigment, and decorated with copper eyebrows, ears, and nose and human hair. Seven potlatch rings woven of split spruce roots are mounted on the top of the hat, with an ermine skin for decoration. The hat measures approximately 34 cm long, 31 cm wide, and 35 cm high. In 1925, Louis Shotridge purchased the Whale Hat (NA10512) and the Raven of the Roof Hat (NA10511) as part of a collection of six objects, referred to as the ‘‘Sitka Whale House Collection,’’ for $640.00, in Sitka, AK, for the collections of the University of Pennsylvania Museum. Based on consultation, museum documentation, anthropological literature, and expert opinion, two cultural items are considered to be objects of cultural patrimony (Barbecuing Raven Helmet, NA8502; Whale Hat, NA10512), and one is considered to be both a sacred object and object of cultural patrimony (Raven of the Roof Hat, NA10511). Therefore, of the eight Tlingit objects, one is a sacred object, three are objects of cultural patrimony, and four are both sacred objects and objects of cultural patrimony. Officials of the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology have determined, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(C), that five cultural items described above are specific ceremonial objects needed by traditional Native American religious leaders for the practice of traditional Native American religions by their present-day adherents. Officials of the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology have also determined, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(D), that seven cultural items described above have ongoing historical, traditional, or cultural importance central to the Native American group or culture itself, rather than property owned by an individual. Lastly, officials of the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology have determined, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), that there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the sacred object, objects of cultural patrimony, and sacred objects/ objects of cultural patrimony and the Central Council of Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska, a Federallyrecognized Indian tribe, and the Tlingit Kaagwaantaan Clan of Sitka, AK, and VerDate Mar<15>2010 17:10 Feb 15, 2011 Jkt 223001 ´ the Tlingit L’ooknax.adi Clan of Sitka, AK. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the sacred object, objects of cultural patrimony, and/or sacred objects/objects of cultural patrimony should contact Dr. Richard Hodges, Director, University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, 3260 South St., Philadelphia, PA 19104–6324, telephone (215) 898–4050, before March 18, 2011. Repatriation of the cultural items to the Central Council of Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska, a Federally-recognized Indian tribe, on behalf of the Tlingit Kaagwaantaan Clan ´ of Sitka, AK, and L’ooknax.adi Clan of Sitka, AK, may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology is responsible for notifying the Central Council of Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska, a Federally-recognized Indian tribe, that this notice has been published. Dated: February 11, 2011. David Tarler, Acting Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2011–3520 Filed 2–15–11; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [2253–65] Notice of Inventory Completion: Washington State Department of Natural Resources, Olympia, WA and University of Washington, Department of Anthropology, Seattle, WA; Correction National Park Service, Interior. Notice; correction. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains in the control of the Washington State Department of Natural Resources, Olympia, WA, and in the physical custody of the University of Washington, Department of Anthropology, Seattle, WA. The human remains were removed from Huckleberry Island, Skagit County, WA. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in PO 00000 Frm 00056 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 9051 this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. This notice corrects the controlling agency and adds two additional Indian tribes found to have a shared group relationship to a Notice of Inventory Completion published in the Federal Register (75 FR 14463, March 25, 2010). Since the time of publication, an additional two Indian tribes have been found to have a cultural affiliation with the Native American human remains. In addition, in the original Notice, the University of Washington, Department of Anthropology, had believed it was in control of the Native American human remains, however, the land was under the control of the Washington State Department of Natural Resources at the time of removal, and as such the Washington State Department of Natural Resources is in control of the Native American human remains. This Notice replaces the Notice of March 25, 2010, with the following: A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the University of Washington, Department of Anthropology, and Burke Museum staff in consultation with representatives of the Lummi Tribe of the Lummi Reservation, Washington; Samish Indian Tribe, Washington; and the Swinomish Indians of the Swinomish Reservation, Washington. At an unknown date, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were removed from Huckleberry Island, Skagit County, WA. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. The human remains were determined to be consistent with Native American morphology, as evidenced through cranial deformation and presence of wormian bones. Huckleberry Island is a small island located approximately 1⁄4 mile southeast of Guemes Island, in Skagit County, WA. This area falls within the Central Coast Salish cultural group (Suttles 1990). Historical documentation indicates that the aboriginal Samish people traditionally occupied Guemes Island (Amoss 1978, Roberts 1975, Ruby and Brown 1986, Smith 1941, Suttles 1951, Swanton 1952) and Huckleberry Island (Barg 2008, unpublished report) both before and after contact. The Treaty of Point Elliot in 1855 stated that the Samish were to be relocated to the Lummi Reservation. After the Treaty of Point Elliot, many Samish individuals relocated to either the Lummi Reservation or the Swinomish E:\FR\FM\16FEN1.SGM 16FEN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 76, Number 32 (Wednesday, February 16, 2011)]
[Notices]
[Pages 9049-9051]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2011-3520]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[2253-65]


Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: University of 
Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, Philadelphia, PA

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

[[Page 9050]]


ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

    Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves 
Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent 
to repatriate cultural items in the possession of the University of 
Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, Philadelphia, PA, 
that meet the definitions of sacred objects and/or objects of cultural 
patrimony under 25 U.S.C. 3001.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The 
determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the cultural 
items. The National Park Service is not responsible for the 
determinations in this notice.
    In this notice there are eight Tlingit objects that were purchased 
by Louis Shotridge, a Tlingit curator employed by the University of 
Pennsylvania Museum to conduct research and make museum collections. 
Tlingit objects affiliated with the Tlingit Kaagwaantaan Clan of Sitka, 
AK, are two helmets (catalog numbers NA8507 and 29-1-1) and three hats 
(catalog numbers NA6864, NA11741, and NA11742). The remaining three 
objects affiliated with the Tlingit L'ooknax.[aacute]di Clan of Sitka, 
AK, are one helmet (catalog number NA8502) and two hats (catalog 
numbers NA10512 and NA10511).
    The following five cultural objects are affiliated with the Tlingit 
Kaagwaantaan Clan of Sitka, AK, as indicated through museum records, 
and through evidence presented by the Central Council of Tlingit and 
Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska, a Federally-recognized Indian tribe, 
acting on behalf of the Kaagwaantaan Clan of Sitka, AK.
    The first cultural item is a helmet called Wolf (NA8507). It is 
carved of wood and represents a wolf, and is painted with green, red, 
black, and white pigment. Natural wolf fur, ears and teeth make the 
helmet more realistic. Red cloth is added to the mouth to represent a 
tongue, and a white ermine skin is attached to the back of the helmet. 
The helmet measures approximately 38.5 cm long, 16.5 cm wide, and 16 cm 
high. In 1918, Louis Shotridge purchased the Wolf Helmet (NA8507) as 
part of a collection of five objects referred to as the ``Eagle's Nest 
House Collection,'' for $40.00 in Sitka, AK, for the collections of the 
University of Pennsylvania Museum.
    The second cultural item is a hat called Ganook (NA6864). It is 
made of maple wood in the shape of a bird's face and beak, and painted 
with blue, red, and black pigment. Opercula shell is inlaid for teeth, 
and the helmet is also decorated with red and white hair. Four potlatch 
rings woven of split spruce roots are mounted on the top. The hat 
measures approximately 28 cm long, 27 cm wide, and 37 cm high. The old 
hat represents Ganook, a petrel, also known as the most ancient being 
in Tlingit mythology. In 1925, Louis Shotridge purchased the Ganook Hat 
(NA6864) for $450.00 from a Tlingit individual, Augustus Bean (Ke.t-
xut'.tc), a housemaster of one of the three Wolf Houses of the 
Kaagwaantaan Clan of Sitka, AK, for the collections of the University 
of Pennsylvania Museum.
    The third cultural item is a hat called Noble Killer (NA11741). It 
represents a whale and is carved from one piece of spruce wood, 
ornamented with abalone shell. The hat is intricately carved and 
painted with greenish-blue, red, and black pigment. A wooden piece 
projecting from the back represents the dorsal fin of the animal. Human 
hair is used as ornamentation on the fin. The hat measures 
approximately 36 cm long, 34 cm wide, and 27.5 cm high. Museum 
documentation indicates the Noble Killer Hat (NA11741) represents the 
maritime power of the Kaagwaantaan clan.
    The fourth cultural item is a hat called Eagle (NA11742). It is 
carved, in one piece, from the root of the red cedar, and is painted 
with greenish-blue, red, black, and white pigment. The hat is decorated 
with coarse, grayish-brown human hair. Designs carved on the sides, 
some of which are inlaid with abalone shell, represent the wings. 
Designs on the front part of the hat represent the eagle's legs and 
talons. The hat measures approximately 33 cm long, 25.5 cm wide, and 26 
cm high. The Eagle Hat represents the Eagle moiety of the Tlingit 
nation.
    In 1926, Louis Shotridge purchased the Noble Killer (or Noble 
Killerwhale) Hat (NA11741) and the Eagle Hat (NA11742) from a Tlingit 
individual, Augustus Bean (Ke.t-xut'.tc), a housemaster for one of the 
three Wolf Houses of the Kaagwaantaan Clan of Sitka, AK. These two 
hats, together with a third hat, were acquired by Louis Shotridge for 
$800.00.
    The fifth cultural item is a helmet called Shark (29-1-1). It is 
made of walrus hide, and has visible interior supports made of wood. 
The helmet is carved and painted with greenish-blue, red, and black 
pigment, and includes abalone shell eyes and mouth, and opercula shell 
teeth. The nose of the shark is covered by an arched frame made of 
carved and painted walrus hide, decorated with hair. The helmet 
measures approximately 38 cm long, 40.5 cm wide, and 48.5 cm high. 
According to museum documentation, it is an old object that is 
associated with the founding of the Kaagwaantaan clan. In 1929, Louis 
Shotridge purchased the Shark Helmet (29-1-1) for $350.00 from a 
Tlingit individual of the Kaagwaantaan clan for the collections of the 
University of Pennsylvania Museum.
    Based on consultation, museum documentation, anthropological 
literature, and expert opinion, one cultural item is considered to be a 
sacred object (Wolf Helmet, NA8507), one is considered to be an object 
of cultural patrimony (Shark Helmet, 29-1-1), and three are considered 
to be both sacred objects and objects of cultural patrimony (Ganook 
Hat, NA6864; Noble Killer Hat, NA11741; Eagle Hat, NA11742).
    The remaining three cultural objects are affiliated with the 
Tlingit L'ooknax.[aacute]di Clan of Sitka, AK, as indicated through 
museum records, and through evidence presented by the Central Council 
of Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska, a Federally-recognized 
Indian tribe, acting on behalf of the Tlingit L'ooknax.[aacute]di Clan 
of Sitka, AK.
    The first cultural item affiliated with the L'ooknax.[aacute]di 
Clan of Sitka, AK, is a helmet called Barbecuing Raven (NA8502). It is 
carved out of wood in the shape of a large raven with a wide flat tail, 
talons, and a second face underneath the raven's beak at the front. The 
wings are made of painted hide. The helmet is painted with blue-green, 
red, and black pigment and it is decorated with copper, and a few 
remaining remnants of puffin beaks. Two potlatch rings woven of split 
spruce roots are mounted on the top, decorated with a single ermine 
skin. The helmet measures approximately 49 cm long, 38 cm wide, and 30 
cm high. In 1918, Louis Shotridge purchased the Barbecuing Raven Helmet 
(NA8502) as part of a collection of five objects, referred to as the 
``Sealion House Collection,'' for $360.00, in Sitka, AK, for the 
collections of the University of Pennsylvania Museum.
    The second cultural item is a hat called Whale (catalog number 
NA10512). It is a basketry hat, woven of spruce tree roots, which has 
been painted white. A design representing a whale with an open mouth is 
painted in black pigment. A carved wooden element secured to the top of 
the hat represents the whale's dorsal fin, and includes a face painted 
with blue-green, red, black and white pigment, abalone

[[Page 9051]]

shell teeth and eyes, and human hair. The helmet measures approximately 
39 cm long, 35 cm wide, and 36 cm high.
    The third cultural item is a hat called Raven of the Roof 
(NA10511). It is carved and painted with blue-green, red, black and 
white pigment, and decorated with copper eyebrows, ears, and nose and 
human hair. Seven potlatch rings woven of split spruce roots are 
mounted on the top of the hat, with an ermine skin for decoration. The 
hat measures approximately 34 cm long, 31 cm wide, and 35 cm high.
    In 1925, Louis Shotridge purchased the Whale Hat (NA10512) and the 
Raven of the Roof Hat (NA10511) as part of a collection of six objects, 
referred to as the ``Sitka Whale House Collection,'' for $640.00, in 
Sitka, AK, for the collections of the University of Pennsylvania 
Museum.
    Based on consultation, museum documentation, anthropological 
literature, and expert opinion, two cultural items are considered to be 
objects of cultural patrimony (Barbecuing Raven Helmet, NA8502; Whale 
Hat, NA10512), and one is considered to be both a sacred object and 
object of cultural patrimony (Raven of the Roof Hat, NA10511). 
Therefore, of the eight Tlingit objects, one is a sacred object, three 
are objects of cultural patrimony, and four are both sacred objects and 
objects of cultural patrimony.
    Officials of the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology 
and Anthropology have determined, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(C), 
that five cultural items described above are specific ceremonial 
objects needed by traditional Native American religious leaders for the 
practice of traditional Native American religions by their present-day 
adherents. Officials of the University of Pennsylvania Museum of 
Archaeology and Anthropology have also determined, pursuant to 25 
U.S.C. 3001(3)(D), that seven cultural items described above have 
ongoing historical, traditional, or cultural importance central to the 
Native American group or culture itself, rather than property owned by 
an individual. Lastly, officials of the University of Pennsylvania 
Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology have determined, pursuant to 25 
U.S.C. 3001(2), that there is a relationship of shared group identity 
that can be reasonably traced between the sacred object, objects of 
cultural patrimony, and sacred objects/objects of cultural patrimony 
and the Central Council of Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska, a 
Federally-recognized Indian tribe, and the Tlingit Kaagwaantaan Clan of 
Sitka, AK, and the Tlingit L'ooknax.[aacute]di Clan of Sitka, AK.
    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with the sacred object, objects of cultural 
patrimony, and/or sacred objects/objects of cultural patrimony should 
contact Dr. Richard Hodges, Director, University of Pennsylvania Museum 
of Archaeology and Anthropology, 3260 South St., Philadelphia, PA 
19104-6324, telephone (215) 898-4050, before March 18, 2011. 
Repatriation of the cultural items to the Central Council of Tlingit 
and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska, a Federally-recognized Indian tribe, 
on behalf of the Tlingit Kaagwaantaan Clan of Sitka, AK, and 
L'ooknax.[aacute]di Clan of Sitka, AK, may proceed after that date if 
no additional claimants come forward.
    The University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and 
Anthropology is responsible for notifying the Central Council of 
Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska, a Federally-recognized 
Indian tribe, that this notice has been published.

    Dated: February 11, 2011.
David Tarler,
Acting Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2011-3520 Filed 2-15-11; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-P