Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Natchez Trace Parkway, Tupelo, MS, 794-795 [2011-4]

Download as PDF 794 Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 4 / Thursday, January 6, 2011 / Notices Conservation Grant Program. The Improvement Act authorizes us to award grants of up to $3 million annually from funds available under each of the Restoration Acts, for a total of up to $6 million annually. We may award grants from a list of priority projects recommended to us by AFWA. The FWS Director, exercising the authority of the Secretary of the Interior, need not fund all projects on the list, but all projects funded must be on the list. Grantees under this program may use funds for sport fisheries and wildlife management and research projects, boating access development, hunter safety and education, aquatic education, fish and wildlife habitat improvements, and other purposes consistent with the enabling legislation. To be eligible for funding, a project must benefit fish and/or wildlife conservation in at least 26 States, or in a majority of the States in any one FWS Region, or it must benefit a regional association of State fish and wildlife agencies. We may award grants to a State, a group of States, or one or more nongovernmental organizations. For the purpose of carrying out the National Survey of Fishing, Hunting and Wildlife-Associated Recreation, we may award grants to the FWS, if requested by AFWA, or to a State or a group of States. Also, AFWA requires all project proposals to address its National Conservation Needs, which are announced annually by AFWA at the same time as its request for proposals. Further, applicants must provide certification that no activities conducted under a Multistate Conservation grant will promote or encourage opposition to regulated hunting or trapping of wildlife or to regulated angling or taking of fish. Eligible project proposals are reviewed and ranked by AFWA Committees and interested nongovernmental organizations that represent conservation organizations, sportsmen’s organizations, and industries that support or promote fishing, hunting, trapping, recreational shooting, bowhunting, or archery. AFWA’s Committee on National Grants recommends a final list of priority projects to the directors of State fish and wildlife agencies for their approval by majority vote. By statute, AFWA then must transmit the final approved list to the FWS for funding under the Multistate Conservation Grant program by October 1. This year, we received a list of 12 recommended projects. We recommend them for funding in 2011. AFWA’s recommended list follows: MSCGP 2011 CYCLE RECOMMENDED PROJECTS Title Submitter 11–014 .............. Coordination of Farm Bill Program Implementation to Optimize Fish & Wildlife Benefits to the States. State Fish and Wildlife Agency Director Travel Coordination and Administration. Assessing Agency Capacities to Manage Fish and Wildlife Health. National Fish Habitat Board Action Plan Implementation. Coordination of the Industry, Federal and State Agency Coalition. Review and Assessment of Bioenergy Provisions in the 2008 Farm Bill. Management Assistance Team .................................. Economic and other Benefits of State Public Access Programs and Implementation of the Voluntary Public Access and Habitat Incentive Program. Operation of the Reservoir Fisheries Habitat Partnership. Trailblazer Adventure Program: Involving Youth and Families in Conservation. AFWA ................ $82,962.00 $82,962.00 $165,924.00 AFWA ................ 83,325.00 83,325.00 166,650.00 Cornell University 90,042.00 90,042.00 180,085.00 AFWA ................ 0 240,000.00 240,000.00 AFWA ................ 90,600.00 90,600.00 181,200.00 AFWA ................ 46,200.00 46,200.00 92,400.00 AFWA ................ AFWA ................ 487,923.00 85,525.00 487,923.00 85,525.00 975,846.00 171,050.00 Arkansas Game & Fish. U.S. Sportsman Alliance Foundation. Pheasants Forever & Quail Forever. WMI ................... 0 296,000.00 296,000.00 160,000.00 0 160,000.00 180,000.00 20,000.00 200,000.00 261,000.00 0 261,000.00 1,522,577.00 1,567,577.00 3,090,154.00 11–058 .............. 11–060 .............. 11–063 .............. 11–026 .............. 11–001 .............. 11–071 .............. 11–015 .............. 11–069 .............. 11–023 .............. 11–009 .............. Expanding Western Farm Bill Conservation Program Delivery through Biologist Partnerships. 11–025 .............. Conservation Leaders for Tomorrow Professional Development Project. Total ........... ..................................................................................... Dated: October 28, 2010. Rowan W. Gould, Acting Director, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. ....................... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [2253–65] erowe on DSK5CLS3C1PROD with NOTICES [FR Doc. 2011–53 Filed 1–5–11; 8:45 am] Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Natchez Trace Parkway, Tupelo, MS BILLING CODE 4310–55–P National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: VerDate Mar<15>2010 15:07 Jan 05, 2011 Jkt 223001 PO 00000 Frm 00025 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 WR request SFR request Total 2011 grant request ID Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate cultural items in the possession of the U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Natchez Trace Parkway, Tupelo, MS, that meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative E:\FR\FM\06JAN1.SGM 06JAN1 erowe on DSK5CLS3C1PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 4 / Thursday, January 6, 2011 / Notices responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the Superintendent, Natchez Trace Parkway, Tupelo, MS. In 1951, unassociated funerary objects were removed from the Mangum site, Claiborne County, MS, during authorized National Park Service survey and excavation projects. The whereabouts of the human remains is unknown. The 34 unassociated funerary objects are 6 ceramic vessel fragments, 1 ceramic jar, 4 projectile points, 6 shell ornaments, 2 shells, 1 stone tool, 1 stone artifact, 1 polished stone, 2 pieces of petrified wood, 2 bone artifacts, 1 worked antler, 2 discoidals, 3 cupreous metal fragments and 2 soil/shell samples. The Mangum site is a large hilltop cemetery located in Claiborne County, MS. Objects recovered from the burials indicate that the site was in use during the Mississippian period (A.D. 1000–1650). In 1540, the De Soto expedition likely encountered the Taensa people in the vicinity of the Mangum site. In 1682, the de La Salle expedition documented the Taensa and Tunica in the same area. In 1706, the Taensa were driven from the area, migrating first to Bayogula, and then to Mobile, where they may have settled with the Choctaw. In 1764, the Taensa again moved, first to the Red River in south Louisiana, and finally to the Bayou Boeuf area where they lived with the Chitimacha. Representatives of the Chitimacha Tribe of Louisiana have identified similarities between the burial practices observed at the Mangum site and those of the Chitimacha. Historical documentation also indicates that the Tunica buried individuals in hilltop cemeteries in open country, matching the burial practice observed on the Mangum site. Historical documentation indicates that some Taensa may have married into the Alabama tribe, the descendants of whom now constitute the AlabamaCoushatta Tribes of Texas and the Alabama-Quassarte Tribal Town, Oklahoma. Officials of Natchez Trace Parkway have determined, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(B), that the 34 cultural items described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony and are believed, by a preponderance of the evidence, to have been removed from a specific burial site of a Native American individual. Officials of Natchez Trace Parkway also have determined, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), that there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be VerDate Mar<15>2010 15:07 Jan 05, 2011 Jkt 223001 reasonably traced between the unassociated funerary objects and the Alabama-Coushatta Tribes of Texas; Alabama-Quassarte Tribal Town, Oklahoma; Chitimacha Tribe of Louisiana; Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma; Jena Band of Choctaw Indians, Louisiana; Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians, Mississippi; and Tunica-Biloxi Indian Tribe of Louisiana. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the unassociated funerary objects should contact Cameron H. Sholly, Superintendent, Natchez Trace Parkway, 2680 Natchez Trace Parkway, Tupelo, MS 38803, telephone (662) 680– 4005, before February 7, 2011. Repatriation of the unassociated funerary objects to the AlabamaCoushatta Tribes of Texas; AlabamaQuassarte Tribal Town, Oklahoma; Chitimacha Tribe of Louisiana; Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma; Jena Band of Choctaw Indians, Louisiana; Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians, Mississippi; and Tunica-Biloxi Indian Tribe of Louisiana, may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. Natchez Trace Parkway is responsible for notifying the Absentee-Shawnee Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma; AlabamaCoushatta Tribes of Texas; AlabamaQuassarte Tribal Town, Oklahoma; Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma; Chickasaw Nation, Oklahoma; Chitimacha Tribe of Louisiana; Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma; Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians of North Carolina; Eastern Shawnee Tribe of Oklahoma; Jena Band of Choctaw Indians, Louisiana; Kialegee Tribal Town, Oklahoma; Miccosukee Tribe of Indians of Florida; Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians, Mississippi; Muscogee (Creek) Nation, Oklahoma; Poarch Band of Creek Indians of Alabama; Seminole Nation of Oklahoma; Seminole Tribe of Florida (Dania, Big Cypress, Brighton, Hollywood & Tampa Reservations); Shawnee Tribe, Oklahoma; Thlopthlocco Tribal Town, Oklahoma; Tunica-Biloxi Indian Tribe of Louisiana; and United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma, that this notice has been published. Dated: December 28, 2010. Sangita Chari, Acting Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2011–4 Filed 1–5–11; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–P PO 00000 Frm 00026 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 795 DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service [2253–65] Notice of Inventory Completion for Native American Human Remains and Associated Funerary Objects in the Possession of the U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Natchez Trace Parkway, Tupelo, MS; Correction National Park Service, Interior. Notice; correction. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects in the possession of the U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Natchez Trace Parkway, Tupelo, MS. The human remains and cultural items were removed from Claiborne County, MS. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the Superintendent, Natchez Trace Parkway, Tupelo, MS. This notice corrects the total number and types of associated funerary objects for a Notice of Inventory Completion published in the Federal Register (67 FR 910–911, January 8, 2002). Since publication an additional 148 associated funerary objects have been discovered. Therefore, in the Federal Register, page 910, paragraph number 4 is corrected by substituting the following paragraph: In 1951 and 1963, human remains representing 124 individuals were recovered from the Mangum site during authorized National Park Service survey and excavation projects. No known individuals were identified. There are no funerary objects associated with the one individual recovered in 1951. The 123 individuals recovered in 1963 are associated with 182 funerary objects: 86 ceramic vessel fragments, 1 ceramic jar, 1 tobacco pipe, 1 frog effigy, 9 projectile points, 4 shell ornaments, 2 shells, 37 shell beads, 1 shell pendant, 1 shell dipper, 4 stone tools, 2 stone artifacts, 6 flakes, 2 pieces of shatter, 2 chisels, 3 polished stones, 8 celts, 2 faunal bones, 9 cupreous metal fragments and 1 cupreous metal plate. In the Federal Register, page 910, paragraph number 6 is corrected by substituting the following paragraph: Officials of the Natchez Trace Parkway have determined, pursuant to E:\FR\FM\06JAN1.SGM 06JAN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 76, Number 4 (Thursday, January 6, 2011)]
[Notices]
[Pages 794-795]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2011-4]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service

[2253-65]


Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of 
the Interior, National Park Service, Natchez Trace Parkway, Tupelo, MS

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

    Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves 
Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent 
to repatriate cultural items in the possession of the U.S. Department 
of the Interior, National Park Service, Natchez Trace Parkway, Tupelo, 
MS, that meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects under 25 
U.S.C. 3001.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative

[[Page 795]]

responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations 
in this notice are the sole responsibility of the Superintendent, 
Natchez Trace Parkway, Tupelo, MS.
    In 1951, unassociated funerary objects were removed from the Mangum 
site, Claiborne County, MS, during authorized National Park Service 
survey and excavation projects. The whereabouts of the human remains is 
unknown. The 34 unassociated funerary objects are 6 ceramic vessel 
fragments, 1 ceramic jar, 4 projectile points, 6 shell ornaments, 2 
shells, 1 stone tool, 1 stone artifact, 1 polished stone, 2 pieces of 
petrified wood, 2 bone artifacts, 1 worked antler, 2 discoidals, 3 
cupreous metal fragments and 2 soil/shell samples. The Mangum site is a 
large hilltop cemetery located in Claiborne County, MS. Objects 
recovered from the burials indicate that the site was in use during the 
Mississippian period (A.D. 1000-1650). In 1540, the De Soto expedition 
likely encountered the Taensa people in the vicinity of the Mangum 
site. In 1682, the de La Salle expedition documented the Taensa and 
Tunica in the same area. In 1706, the Taensa were driven from the area, 
migrating first to Bayogula, and then to Mobile, where they may have 
settled with the Choctaw. In 1764, the Taensa again moved, first to the 
Red River in south Louisiana, and finally to the Bayou Boeuf area where 
they lived with the Chitimacha. Representatives of the Chitimacha Tribe 
of Louisiana have identified similarities between the burial practices 
observed at the Mangum site and those of the Chitimacha. Historical 
documentation also indicates that the Tunica buried individuals in 
hilltop cemeteries in open country, matching the burial practice 
observed on the Mangum site. Historical documentation indicates that 
some Taensa may have married into the Alabama tribe, the descendants of 
whom now constitute the Alabama-Coushatta Tribes of Texas and the 
Alabama-Quassarte Tribal Town, Oklahoma.
    Officials of Natchez Trace Parkway have determined, pursuant to 25 
U.S.C. 3001(3)(B), that the 34 cultural items described above are 
reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human 
remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or 
ceremony and are believed, by a preponderance of the evidence, to have 
been removed from a specific burial site of a Native American 
individual. Officials of Natchez Trace Parkway also have determined, 
pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), that there is a relationship of shared 
group identity that can be reasonably traced between the unassociated 
funerary objects and the Alabama-Coushatta Tribes of Texas; Alabama-
Quassarte Tribal Town, Oklahoma; Chitimacha Tribe of Louisiana; Choctaw 
Nation of Oklahoma; Jena Band of Choctaw Indians, Louisiana; 
Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians, Mississippi; and Tunica-Biloxi 
Indian Tribe of Louisiana.
    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with the unassociated funerary objects should 
contact Cameron H. Sholly, Superintendent, Natchez Trace Parkway, 2680 
Natchez Trace Parkway, Tupelo, MS 38803, telephone (662) 680-4005, 
before February 7, 2011. Repatriation of the unassociated funerary 
objects to the Alabama-Coushatta Tribes of Texas; Alabama-Quassarte 
Tribal Town, Oklahoma; Chitimacha Tribe of Louisiana; Choctaw Nation of 
Oklahoma; Jena Band of Choctaw Indians, Louisiana; Mississippi Band of 
Choctaw Indians, Mississippi; and Tunica-Biloxi Indian Tribe of 
Louisiana, may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come 
forward.
    Natchez Trace Parkway is responsible for notifying the Absentee-
Shawnee Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma; Alabama-Coushatta Tribes of 
Texas; Alabama-Quassarte Tribal Town, Oklahoma; Cherokee Nation, 
Oklahoma; Chickasaw Nation, Oklahoma; Chitimacha Tribe of Louisiana; 
Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma; Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians of North 
Carolina; Eastern Shawnee Tribe of Oklahoma; Jena Band of Choctaw 
Indians, Louisiana; Kialegee Tribal Town, Oklahoma; Miccosukee Tribe of 
Indians of Florida; Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians, Mississippi; 
Muscogee (Creek) Nation, Oklahoma; Poarch Band of Creek Indians of 
Alabama; Seminole Nation of Oklahoma; Seminole Tribe of Florida (Dania, 
Big Cypress, Brighton, Hollywood & Tampa Reservations); Shawnee Tribe, 
Oklahoma; Thlopthlocco Tribal Town, Oklahoma; Tunica-Biloxi Indian 
Tribe of Louisiana; and United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians in 
Oklahoma, that this notice has been published.

    Dated: December 28, 2010.
Sangita Chari,
Acting Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2011-4 Filed 1-5-11; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-P