Discretionary Grant Program, 159-160 [2010-33063]

Download as PDF (Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance Program No. 93.778, Medical Assistance Program) DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Dated: October 20, 2010. Donald M. Berwick, Administrator, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. Dated: November 17, 2010. Kathleen Sebelius, Secretary. Health Resources and Services Administration [FR Doc. 2010–32979 Filed 12–30–10; 8:45 am] jlentini on DSKJ8SOYB1PROD with NOTICES 15:48 Dec 30, 2010 AGENCY: Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), HHS. ACTION: Notice of noncompetitive program supplemental award. SUMMARY: HRSA will be issuing noncompetitive supplemental grant funding to the University of Wisconsin, Laboratory of Hygiene, Madison, Wisconsin, under the Maternal Child and Health Bureau’s Blood Lead Proficiency Testing Program. The University of Wisconsin will use these funds to initiate an orderly closeout of BILLING CODE 4120–01–C VerDate Mar<15>2010 Discretionary Grant Program Jkt 223001 PO 00000 Frm 00079 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 159 HRSA-funded activities which clearly fall within the purview of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s ‘‘Preventing Lead Poisoning in Young Children’’ initiative at their National Center for Environmental Health. This action will also accord the University of Wisconsin and the Center additional time to solicit recommendations from the CDC’s Advisory Committee on Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention with respect to future funding for this activity. The Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB) has continuously supported the National Blood Lead and Erythrocyte Protoprophyrin (EP) Proficiency Testing Program through the University of Wisconsin since 1988. Childhood lead poisoning is a wellcharacterized public health problem in E:\FR\FM\03JAN1.SGM 03JAN1 EN03JA11.003</GPH> Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 1 / Monday, January 3, 2011 / Notices 160 Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 1 / Monday, January 3, 2011 / Notices manufacturer to promote participation. The third factor is that some States have initiated PT requirements, deeming this quality check of sufficient importance to mandate successful participation as a requisite for Medicaid reimbursement. This State-level action illustrates the importance of this PT participation, and may be the beginning of a trend that will serve to increase participation even more. The University of Wisconsin will use these funds to initiate an orderly closeout of HRSA-funded activities which clearly falls within the purview of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s ‘‘Preventing Lead Poisoning in Young Children’’ initiative at their National Center for Environmental Health. This extension with funding will also accord the University of Wisconsin and the Center to solicit recommendations from the CDC’s Advisory Committee on Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention with respect to future funding for this activity. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: David Heppel, M.D., Director, Division of Child, Adolescent and Family Health, Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Room 18A–30, Rockville, MD 20857; 301–443–2250; dheppel@hrsa.gov. Authority: Section 501(c)(1) of the Social Security Act, as amended. jlentini on DSKJ8SOYB1PROD with NOTICES the U.S., and is unfortunately overrepresented in minority, immigrant, and low socio-economic populations. The proper detection and treatment of lead poisoning relies entirely on the accurate and precise measurement of blood lead concentration. EP is utilized as an adjunct test to indicate the extent and duration of lead exposure, as well as the detection of iron deficiency, another pediatric health issue. Proficiency testing (PT) is a proven method for assuring and improving laboratory test accuracy. This program has costeffectively provided monthly PT and other lab quality improvement tools to nearly 600 laboratories across the U.S. and beyond. Of note, the primary focus of the program over the last few years has been the integration of new and usually inexperienced participants into the program. An enrollment boom has been fueled by proliferation of the CLIAwaived LeadCare II point of care testing instrument. In the three years since its introduction, LeadCare II enrollment has grown from zero to 300 laboratories, comprising approximately 40 percent of all participants. Continued participation increases, and the fact that those increases are nearly totally comprised of LeadCare II users, represent both a public health success and a challenge for this program. Since its introduction in early 2007, over 300 of these laboratories have enrolled for PT, swelling program participation to 800 laboratories. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Intended Recipients of the Award: University of Wisconsin, Laboratory of Hygiene, Madison, Wisconsin. Amount of the Non-Competitive Supplemental Funding: $250,000. Health Resources and Services Administration CFDA Number: 93.110. Proposed Project Period: January 1, 2008–October 31, 2011. Justification for Exception to Competition: The participation of large numbers of these labs in voluntary proficiency was by design, and represents a public health success by assuring blood lead screening accuracy where there would otherwise be no evaluation. Three factors contribute to this. First, is the HRSA support of this program, which has been increased to accommodate the additional labs. This support allows laboratories to participate at no cost, a vital consideration for voluntary participants. The second factor is the effort of the NBLPT Program to integrate the new technology shortly after it became available, and collaboration with the VerDate Mar<15>2010 15:48 Dec 30, 2010 Jkt 223001 Dated: December 23, 2010. Mary K. Wakefield, Administrator. [FR Doc. 2010–33063 Filed 12–30–10; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4165–15–P DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Advisory Committee on Rural Health and Human Services; Notice of Meeting In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92–463), announcement is made of the following National Advisory body scheduled to meet during the month of February 2011. The National Advisory committee on Rural Health will convene its sixtyseventh meeting in the time and place specified below: Name: National Advisory Committee on Rural Health and Human Services. Dates and Times: February 23, 2011, 8:45 a.m.–5 p.m. February 24, 2011, 8:45 a.m.–4 p.m. February 25, 2011, 8:45 a.m.–11:15 a.m. PO 00000 Frm 00080 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Place: Omni Shoreham Hotel, 2500 Calvert Street, NW., Washington, DC 20008. Phone: (202) 234–0700. Status: The meeting will be open to the public. Purpose: The National Advisory Committee on Rural Health and Human Services provides advice and recommendations to the Secretary with respect to the delivery, research, development and administration of health and human services in rural areas. Agenda: Wednesday morning at 9 a.m. the meeting will be called to order by the Chairperson of the Committee, the Honorable Ronnie Musgrove. There will be an update from officials from the Department of Health and Human Services. This will be followed by a series of panel presentations on key provisions from the Affordable Care Act (ACA). The Committee will be examining the rural implications of several provisions from the ACA, including health insurance exchanges, the Maternal and Early Childhood Home Visitation program and the Community Living Assistance, Services and Support program. The day will conclude with a period of public comment at approximately 4:30 p.m. Thursday morning at 9 a.m. the Committee will continue to hear panel presentations on ACA-related provisions and will then break into subcommittees on each of those topics for further discussion. The day will conclude with a period of public comment at approximately 4:30 p.m. Friday morning at 9 a.m. the Committee will summarize key findings from the meeting and develop a work plan for the next quarter and the June meeting. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Thomas Morris, MPA, Executive Secretary, National Advisory Committee on Rural Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration, Parklawn Building, Room 10B–45, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone (301) 443–0835, Fax (301) 443–2803. Persons interested in attending any portion of the meeting should contact Tish Scolnick at the Office of Rural Health Policy (ORHP) via Telephone at (301) 443–0835, or by e-mail at nscolnick@hrsa.gov. The Committee meeting agenda will be posted on ORHP’s Web site http:// www.ruralhealth.hrsa.gov. E:\FR\FM\03JAN1.SGM 03JAN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 76, Number 1 (Monday, January 3, 2011)]
[Notices]
[Pages 159-160]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2010-33063]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

Health Resources and Services Administration


Discretionary Grant Program

AGENCY: Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), HHS.

ACTION: Notice of noncompetitive program supplemental award.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: HRSA will be issuing non-competitive supplemental grant 
funding to the University of Wisconsin, Laboratory of Hygiene, Madison, 
Wisconsin, under the Maternal Child and Health Bureau's Blood Lead 
Proficiency Testing Program. The University of Wisconsin will use these 
funds to initiate an orderly closeout of HRSA-funded activities which 
clearly fall within the purview of the Centers for Disease Control and 
Prevention's ``Preventing Lead Poisoning in Young Children'' initiative 
at their National Center for Environmental Health. This action will 
also accord the University of Wisconsin and the Center additional time 
to solicit recommendations from the CDC's Advisory Committee on 
Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention with respect to future funding for 
this activity.
    The Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB) has continuously 
supported the National Blood Lead and Erythrocyte Protoprophyrin (EP) 
Proficiency Testing Program through the University of Wisconsin since 
1988. Childhood lead poisoning is a well-characterized public health 
problem in

[[Page 160]]

the U.S., and is unfortunately over-represented in minority, immigrant, 
and low socio-economic populations. The proper detection and treatment 
of lead poisoning relies entirely on the accurate and precise 
measurement of blood lead concentration. EP is utilized as an adjunct 
test to indicate the extent and duration of lead exposure, as well as 
the detection of iron deficiency, another pediatric health issue. 
Proficiency testing (PT) is a proven method for assuring and improving 
laboratory test accuracy. This program has cost-effectively provided 
monthly PT and other lab quality improvement tools to nearly 600 
laboratories across the U.S. and beyond. Of note, the primary focus of 
the program over the last few years has been the integration of new and 
usually inexperienced participants into the program. An enrollment boom 
has been fueled by proliferation of the CLIA-waived LeadCare II point 
of care testing instrument. In the three years since its introduction, 
LeadCare II enrollment has grown from zero to 300 laboratories, 
comprising approximately 40 percent of all participants. Continued 
participation increases, and the fact that those increases are nearly 
totally comprised of LeadCare II users, represent both a public health 
success and a challenge for this program. Since its introduction in 
early 2007, over 300 of these laboratories have enrolled for PT, 
swelling program participation to 800 laboratories.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:
    Intended Recipients of the Award: University of Wisconsin, 
Laboratory of Hygiene, Madison, Wisconsin.
    Amount of the Non-Competitive Supplemental Funding: $250,000.

    Authority: Section 501(c)(1) of the Social Security Act, as 
amended.

    CFDA Number: 93.110.
    Proposed Project Period: January 1, 2008-October 31, 2011.
    Justification for Exception to Competition:
    The participation of large numbers of these labs in voluntary 
proficiency was by design, and represents a public health success by 
assuring blood lead screening accuracy where there would otherwise be 
no evaluation. Three factors contribute to this. First, is the HRSA 
support of this program, which has been increased to accommodate the 
additional labs.
    This support allows laboratories to participate at no cost, a vital 
consideration for voluntary participants. The second factor is the 
effort of the NBLPT Program to integrate the new technology shortly 
after it became available, and collaboration with the manufacturer to 
promote participation. The third factor is that some States have 
initiated PT requirements, deeming this quality check of sufficient 
importance to mandate successful participation as a requisite for 
Medicaid reimbursement. This State-level action illustrates the 
importance of this PT participation, and may be the beginning of a 
trend that will serve to increase participation even more.
    The University of Wisconsin will use these funds to initiate an 
orderly closeout of HRSA-funded activities which clearly falls within 
the purview of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's 
``Preventing Lead Poisoning in Young Children'' initiative at their 
National Center for Environmental Health. This extension with funding 
will also accord the University of Wisconsin and the Center to solicit 
recommendations from the CDC's Advisory Committee on Childhood Lead 
Poisoning Prevention with respect to future funding for this activity.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: David Heppel, M.D., Director, Division 
of Child, Adolescent and Family Health, Maternal and Child Health 
Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers 
Lane, Room 18A-30, Rockville, MD 20857; 301-443-2250; dheppel@hrsa.gov.

    Dated: December 23, 2010.
Mary K. Wakefield,
Administrator.
[FR Doc. 2010-33063 Filed 12-30-10; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4165-15-P