Bandon Marsh, Nestucca Bay, and Siletz Bay National Wildlife Refuges, Coos, Tillamook, and Lincoln Counties, OR; Comprehensive Conservation Plan and Environmental Assessment, 73121-73123 [2010-30063]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 75, No. 228 / Monday, November 29, 2010 / Notices Number of respondents Activity Number of responses Completion time per response 73121 Total annual burden hours FWS Form 3–XXXX ......................................................................... FWS Form 3–YYYY ......................................................................... 1,200 300 1,200 300 4 hours 4 hours 4,800 1,200 Totals ........................................................................................ 15,000 15,000 ............................ 19,500 III. Comments We invite comments concerning this information collection on: • Whether or not the collection of information is necessary, including whether or not the information will have practical utility; • The accuracy of our estimate of the burden for this collection of information; • Ways to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; and • Ways to minimize the burden of the collection of information on respondents. Comments that you submit in response to this notice are a matter of public record. We will include or summarize each comment in our request to OMB to approve this IC. Before including your address, phone number, e-mail address, or other personal identifying information in your comment, you should be aware that your entire comment, including your personal identifying information, may be made publicly available at any time. While you can ask us in your comment to withhold your personal identifying information from public review, we cannot guarantee that we will be able to do so. Dated: November 23, 2010. Hope Grey, Information Collection Clearance Officer, Fish and Wildlife Service. [FR Doc. 2010–29977 Filed 11–26–10; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4310–55–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service mstockstill on DSKH9S0YB1PROD with NOTICES [FWS–R1–R–2010–N230; 10137–1265–0000 S3] Bandon Marsh, Nestucca Bay, and Siletz Bay National Wildlife Refuges, Coos, Tillamook, and Lincoln Counties, OR; Comprehensive Conservation Plan and Environmental Assessment Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Intent; announcement of three public open house meetings; request for comments. AGENCY: VerDate Mar<15>2010 17:57 Nov 26, 2010 Jkt 223001 We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), intend to prepare a comprehensive conservation plan (CCP) for the Bandon Marsh, Nestucca Bay, and Siletz Bay National Wildlife Refuges (NWRs), in or near the towns of Bandon, Pacific City, Neskowin, and Lincoln City, Oregon. We will also prepare an environmental assessment (EA) to evaluate the potential effects of various CCP alternatives. We provide this notice in compliance with our CCP policy to advise other Federal and State agencies, Tribes, and the public of our intentions and to obtain suggestions and information on the scope of issues to consider during the planning process. We are also announcing public meetings and requesting public comments. DATES: To ensure consideration, please send your written comments by December 31, 2010. We will hold public meetings to begin the CCP planning process; see Public Meetings under SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION for dates, times, and locations. ADDRESSES: Send your comments or requests for more information by any of the following methods: E-mail: oregoncoastCCP@fws.gov. Include ‘‘Bandon Marsh, Nestucca Bay, and Siletz Bay CCP’’ in the subject line of the message. Fax: Attn: Project Leader, 541–867– 4551. U.S. Mail: Oregon Coast National Wildlife Refuge Complex, 2127 SE. Marine Science Drive, Newport, OR 97365. In-Person Drop-off: You may drop off comments during regular business hours at the above address. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Roy W. Lowe, Project Leader, Oregon Coast National Wildlife Refuge Complex, 2127 SE. Marine Science Drive, Newport, OR 97365; phone (541) 867–4550, and fax (541) 867–4551. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: SUMMARY: Introduction With this notice, we initiate our process for developing a CCP for Bandon Marsh, Nestucca Bay, and Siletz Bay National Wildlife Refuges in Coos, Tillamook, and Lincoln Counties, Oregon. This notice complies with our CCP policy to (1) advise other Federal PO 00000 Frm 00095 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 and State agencies, Tribes, and the public of our intention to conduct detailed planning on these refuges, and (2) obtain suggestions and information on the scope of issues to consider in the environmental document and during development of the CCP. Background The CCP Process The National Wildlife Refuge System Administration Act of 1966 (16 U.S.C. 668dd–668ee) (Refuge Administration Act), as amended by the National Wildlife Refuge System Improvement Act of 1997, requires us to develop a CCP for each national wildlife refuge. The purpose for developing a CCP is to provide refuge managers with a 15-year plan for achieving refuge purposes and contributing toward the mission of the National Wildlife Refuge System, consistent with sound principles of fish and wildlife management, conservation, legal mandates, and our policies. We will review and update the CCP at least every 15 years in accordance with the Refuge Administration Act. Each unit of the National Wildlife Refuge System was established for specific purposes. These purposes are the foundation for developing and prioritizing the conservation and management goals and objectives for each refuge within the National Wildlife Refuge System, and determining compatible public uses for each refuge. The planning process is a way for us and the public to evaluate management goals and objectives for refuge wildlife, plant, and habitat conservation, while providing for wildlife-dependent recreation opportunities that are compatible with the refuge’s establishing purposes and the mission of the National Wildlife Refuge System. Our CCP process provides participation opportunities for Tribal, State, and local governments; agencies; organizations; and the public. At this time we encourage input in the form of issues, concerns, ideas, and suggestions for the future management of Bandon Marsh, Nestucca Bay, and Siletz Bay Refuges. We will conduct an environmental review of this project and prepare an EA in accordance with the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, as amended (NEPA) (42 U.S.C. E:\FR\FM\29NON1.SGM 29NON1 73122 Federal Register / Vol. 75, No. 228 / Monday, November 29, 2010 / Notices mstockstill on DSKH9S0YB1PROD with NOTICES 4321 et seq.); NEPA regulations (40 CFR parts 1500–1508); other appropriate Federal laws and regulations; and our policies and procedures for compliance with those laws and regulations. Bandon Marsh, Nestucca Bay, and Siletz Bay National Wildlife Refuges Bandon Marsh NWR was established in 1983, with the acquisition of 289 acres of salt marsh, mudflats, and tidal sloughs. The Bandon Marsh Unit is located near the mouth of the Coquille River, with approximately 75 percent of the Unit within the city limits of Bandon, Oregon. The 582-acre Niles’tun Unit, established in 2000, includes 400 acres of historic salt marsh that is currently being restored to tidal action. The Ni-les’tun Unit is located on the east side of Highway 101 on the north bank of the Coquille River. The total land base of Bandon Marsh NWR is 889 acres. The purpose for establishing Bandon Marsh NWR was ‘‘for the preservation and enhancement of the highly significant wildlife habitat of the area known as Bandon Marsh, in the estuary of the Coquille River * * * for the protection of migratory waterfowl, numerous species of shorebirds, and fish, including Chinook and silver salmon, and to provide opportunity for wildlife-oriented recreation and nature study on the marsh * * *’’ (95 Stat. 1709, dated Dec 29, 1981). The Niles’tun Unit was added to Bandon Marsh NWR in order to (1) protect and restore intertidal marsh, freshwater marsh, and riparian areas to provide a diversity of habitats for migratory birds, including waterfowl, shorebirds, wading birds, and songbirds; (2) restore intertidal marsh habitat for anadromous fish such as the threatened coho salmon, chinook, chum salmon, steelhead, and cutthroat trout; (3) protect and restore habitat for species listed under the Endangered Species Act as threatened or endangered; and (4) provide wildlifedependent public use opportunities compatible with refuge purposes. Nestucca Bay NWR is located near Pacific City and Neskowin in Tillamook County, Oregon. The refuge was established in 1991 with the acquisition of a 384-acre dairy farm, and has since expanded to 818.5 acres. The primary need for establishing Nestucca Bay NWR was to protect high-quality coastal habitats for dusky Canada geese and threatened Aleutian Canada geese (delisted in 2001); other endangered and threatened species; and a variety of other migratory waterfowl, shorebirds, raptors, songbirds, anadromous fish, and other wildlife while preserving part of Oregon’s biodiversity. In 2002, the VerDate Mar<15>2010 17:57 Nov 26, 2010 Jkt 223001 refuge was expanded to include the Neskowin Marsh Unit (222.6 acres acquired), located about 2.5 miles south of the Nestucca Bay Refuge Unit near the community of Neskowin, Oregon. Neskowin Marsh incorporates unique freshwater wetland and bog habitats and wildlife resources not found within the initial refuge boundary. Siletz Bay NWR is located near Lincoln City on the central coast of Oregon. The refuge was established in 1991 with a donation of 46 acres of tidally muted salt marsh. The approved acquisition refuge boundary totals 1,936 acres and encompasses the northern tip of the Siletz spit, vegetated and unvegetated tidelands of the bay, and a portion of the diked former tidelands of the Siletz River floodplain. Approximately 1,060 acres within the authorized boundary are State-owned tidelands. Currently, refuge lands total 568 acres. The primary need for establishing this refuge was to protect coastal wetland habitats and upland buffers for a variety of waterfowl, shorebirds, marine mammals, endangered species, raptors, songbirds, fish, and other wildlife. The refuge serves to protect the remaining coastal wetlands and uplands adjacent to Siletz Bay from rapidly encroaching development, and management emphasis has been to enhance and restore wetland and upland habitats for a variety of estuarine-dependent fish and wildlife species. Scoping: Preliminary Issues, Concerns, and Opportunities We have identified preliminary issues, concerns, and opportunities that we may address in the CCP. We have briefly summarized these issues below. During public scoping, we may identify additional issues. Bandon Marsh NWR Preliminary Issues: What actions should the Service take to sustain and restore priority species and habitats on this refuge over the next 15 years? Based upon the refuge’s priority fish and wildlife species, which habitats would be monitored and managed to control invasive species? What management options should the refuge consider for restoration of the degraded upland forest and grassland? What possibilities exist for enhancing existing or adding additional wildlife-dependent recreational opportunities, including wildlife observation trails and/or photography points? Which areas/ habitats of the refuge should be managed as undisturbed wildlife sanctuary areas (closed to the public) and which areas should be open to public use? Should the refuge consider PO 00000 Frm 00096 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 changes to the Bandon Marsh NWR waterfowl hunting program? Would allowing hunting and other wildlifedependent recreational uses in new areas (e.g., Ni-les’tun Unit) have detrimental effects on the refuge’s ability to provide adequate undisturbed quality wintering habitat for waterfowl and other wildlife? Is there enough use of the refuge by migrating waterfowl to provide a quality hunting program? Nestucca Bay NWR Preliminary Issues: What actions should the Service take to sustain and restore priority species and habitats on this refuge over the next 15 years? Based upon the refuge’s priority fish and wildlife species, which are the priority habitats to monitor for invasive species, and what is the range of Integrated Pest Management strategies that should be considered to reduce the incidence and spread of invasive species? Should the Service consider restoring some pastures at Nestucca Bay NWR to tidal marsh, and what effect would this have on the refuge’s ability to provide wintering habitat for geese and reduce goose depredation on neighboring private lands? Should the Cannery Hill Unit at Nestucca Bay NWR be managed specifically to restore former coastal prairie, and if so, how much emphasis should be placed on specific needs of the threatened Oregon silverspot butterfly within a larger coastal prairie restoration plan? What options should be considered for the old roadbed through Neskowin Marsh (tsunami escape route) if it is found to be impacting water flows through Neskowin Marsh? Should the Service consider designating Neskowin Marsh as a Research Natural Area? What possibilities exist for adding or enhancing existing wildlife-dependent recreational opportunities on Nestucca Bay NWR? Are existing refuge access points and uses adequate and do they provide a quality experience? Should the refuge consider establishing waterfowl hunting programs at Nestucca Bay NWR? Can the level of migrating waterfowl use on Nestucca Bay NWR support a quality hunting program? Siletz Bay NWR Preliminary Issues: What actions should the Service take to sustain and restore priority species and habitats on this refuge over the next 15 years? Based upon the refuge’s priority fish and wildlife species, which habitats are most important to monitor for invasive species? What partnering possibilities exist for treatment of aquatic invasive species such as smooth cordgrass and New Zealand mud snail? Can wetlands currently hampered by fish passage barriers and other issues be restored, and if so, how should the E:\FR\FM\29NON1.SGM 29NON1 Federal Register / Vol. 75, No. 228 / Monday, November 29, 2010 / Notices Service prioritize them? What opportunities exist for adding or enhancing existing wildlife-dependent recreational opportunities and access points? Which areas of the refuge should be managed as undisturbed sanctuary areas and which areas should be considered for public access? Should the refuge consider establishing a waterfowl hunting program at Siletz Bay NWR? Would waterfowl hunting and other wildlife-dependent recreational activities have detrimental effects on the refuge’s ability to provide adequate undisturbed quality wintering habitat for waterfowl? Is there enough use of the refuge by migrating waterfowl to support a quality hunting program? Should the refuge consider enhancing the currently offered seasonal 73123 opportunities to observe wildlife via guided canoe/kayak excursion through the refuge? Public Meetings We will hold the following public meetings. For more information, contact the person under FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT. Date Time Location November 29, 2010 ............................................................................... 6–9 p.m. .. November 30, 2010 ............................................................................... 6–9 p.m. .. December 2, 2010 ................................................................................. 6–9 p.m. .. Lincoln City Community Center, 2150 NE. Oar Place, Lincoln City, OR 97367. Kiawanda Community Center, 34600 Cape Kiawanda Drive, Pacific City, OR 97135. Bandon Community Center, 1200 11th Street SW., Bandon, OR 97411. BILLING CODE 4310–55–P available for release. The BLM subsequently determined that additional information should have been included in the cumulative impact section of the EA. The BLM will be issuing a revised EA, which will be available for a 30-day comment period upon completion. After the end of the comment period, the BLM will hold a public hearing on the EA, the fair market value and the maximum economic recovery of the proposed leased tract. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Kurt M. Barton, Land Law Examiner, 2850 Youngfield Street, Lakewood, CO 80215 at (303) 239–3714, Kurt_Barton@blm.gov, or Jennifer Maiolo, Mining Engineer, 455 Emerson Street, Craig, CO 81625 at 970–826– 5077, Jennifer_Maiolo@blm.gov. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Helen M. Hankins, State Director. Public Availability of Comments Before including your address, phone number, e-mail address, or other personal identifying information in your comment, you should be aware that your entire comment—including your personal identifying information—may be made publicly available at any time. While you can ask us in your comment to withhold your personal identifying information from public review, we cannot guarantee that we will be able to do so. Dated: October 28, 2010. Theresa E. Rabot, Acting Regional Director, Region 1, Portland, Oregon. [FR Doc. 2010–30063 Filed 11–26–10; 8:45 am] [FR Doc. 2010–29864 Filed 11–26–10; 8:45 am] Bureau of Land Management BILLING CODE 4310–JB–P [LLCO–921000–L13200000–EL0000– LVELC10CC770; COC–74219] DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Notice of Correction to Notice of Availability of the Environmental Assessment and Notice of Public Hearing for the Sage Creek Holdings, LLC, Federal Coal Lease Application, COC–74219 Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Correction. AGENCY: The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is correcting the Notice of Availability of the Environmental Assessment (EA) and Notice of Public Hearing for the Sage Creek Holdings, LLC, Federal Coal Lease Application, COC–74219 published in the Federal Register on August 13, 2010 [75 FR 49512]. The BLM incorrectly stated that the EA was complete and mstockstill on DSKH9S0YB1PROD with NOTICES SUMMARY: VerDate Mar<15>2010 17:57 Nov 26, 2010 Jkt 223001 National Park Service [2462–PYB] Information Collection Sent to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for Approval; OMB Control Number 1024–0022; Backcountry Use Permit National Park Service, Interior. Notice; request for comments. AGENCY: ACTION: We (National Park Service, NPS) have sent an Information Collection Request (ICR) to OMB for review and approval. We summarize the ICR below and describe the nature of the collection and the estimated burden and cost. This ICR is scheduled to expire on November 30, 2010. We may not SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00097 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 conduct or sponsor and a person is not required to respond to a collection of information unless it displays a currently valid OMB control number. However, under OMB regulations, we may continue to conduct or sponsor this information collection while it is pending at OMB. DATES: You must submit comments on or before December 29, 2010. ADDRESSES: Send your comments and suggestions on this information collection to the Desk Officer for the Department of the Interior, Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, OMB, at (202) 395–5806 (fax) or OIRA_DOCKET@OMB.eop.gov (e-mail). Please provide a copy of your comments to Garry Oye, Chief of Wilderness Stewardship Division, National Park Service, 1201 Eye Street NW., (Room 1004), Washington DC 20005; via fax at (202) 371–6623; or via e-mail at Garry_Oye@nps.gov. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: To request additional information about this ICR, contact Garry Oye by mail, fax, or e-mail (see ADDRESSES) or by phone at (202) 513–7090. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: OMB Control Number: 1024–0022. Title: Backcountry Use Permit (36 CFR 1.5, 1.6, and 2.10). Form Number: 10–404A. Type of Request: Extension of a currently approved collection. Description of Respondents: Individuals wishing to use backcountry areas within national parks. Respondent’s Obligation: Required to obtain or retain a benefit. Frequency of Collection: On occasion. Estimated Number of Respondents: 285,000. Estimated Number of Responses: 285,000. Completion Time per Response: 0.083 hours. E:\FR\FM\29NON1.SGM 29NON1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 75, Number 228 (Monday, November 29, 2010)]
[Notices]
[Pages 73121-73123]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2010-30063]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

Fish and Wildlife Service

[FWS-R1-R-2010-N230; 10137-1265-0000 S3]


Bandon Marsh, Nestucca Bay, and Siletz Bay National Wildlife 
Refuges, Coos, Tillamook, and Lincoln Counties, OR; Comprehensive 
Conservation Plan and Environmental Assessment

AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice of Intent; announcement of three public open house 
meetings; request for comments.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), intend to 
prepare a comprehensive conservation plan (CCP) for the Bandon Marsh, 
Nestucca Bay, and Siletz Bay National Wildlife Refuges (NWRs), in or 
near the towns of Bandon, Pacific City, Neskowin, and Lincoln City, 
Oregon. We will also prepare an environmental assessment (EA) to 
evaluate the potential effects of various CCP alternatives. We provide 
this notice in compliance with our CCP policy to advise other Federal 
and State agencies, Tribes, and the public of our intentions and to 
obtain suggestions and information on the scope of issues to consider 
during the planning process. We are also announcing public meetings and 
requesting public comments.

DATES: To ensure consideration, please send your written comments by 
December 31, 2010. We will hold public meetings to begin the CCP 
planning process; see Public Meetings under SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION 
for dates, times, and locations.

ADDRESSES: Send your comments or requests for more information by any 
of the following methods:
    E-mail: oregoncoastCCP@fws.gov. Include ``Bandon Marsh, Nestucca 
Bay, and Siletz Bay CCP'' in the subject line of the message.
    Fax: Attn: Project Leader, 541-867-4551.
    U.S. Mail: Oregon Coast National Wildlife Refuge Complex, 2127 SE. 
Marine Science Drive, Newport, OR 97365.
    In-Person Drop-off: You may drop off comments during regular 
business hours at the above address.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Roy W. Lowe, Project Leader, Oregon 
Coast National Wildlife Refuge Complex, 2127 SE. Marine Science Drive, 
Newport, OR 97365; phone (541) 867-4550, and fax (541) 867-4551.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

Introduction

    With this notice, we initiate our process for developing a CCP for 
Bandon Marsh, Nestucca Bay, and Siletz Bay National Wildlife Refuges in 
Coos, Tillamook, and Lincoln Counties, Oregon. This notice complies 
with our CCP policy to (1) advise other Federal and State agencies, 
Tribes, and the public of our intention to conduct detailed planning on 
these refuges, and (2) obtain suggestions and information on the scope 
of issues to consider in the environmental document and during 
development of the CCP.

Background

The CCP Process

    The National Wildlife Refuge System Administration Act of 1966 (16 
U.S.C. 668dd-668ee) (Refuge Administration Act), as amended by the 
National Wildlife Refuge System Improvement Act of 1997, requires us to 
develop a CCP for each national wildlife refuge. The purpose for 
developing a CCP is to provide refuge managers with a 15-year plan for 
achieving refuge purposes and contributing toward the mission of the 
National Wildlife Refuge System, consistent with sound principles of 
fish and wildlife management, conservation, legal mandates, and our 
policies. We will review and update the CCP at least every 15 years in 
accordance with the Refuge Administration Act.
    Each unit of the National Wildlife Refuge System was established 
for specific purposes. These purposes are the foundation for developing 
and prioritizing the conservation and management goals and objectives 
for each refuge within the National Wildlife Refuge System, and 
determining compatible public uses for each refuge. The planning 
process is a way for us and the public to evaluate management goals and 
objectives for refuge wildlife, plant, and habitat conservation, while 
providing for wildlife-dependent recreation opportunities that are 
compatible with the refuge's establishing purposes and the mission of 
the National Wildlife Refuge System.
    Our CCP process provides participation opportunities for Tribal, 
State, and local governments; agencies; organizations; and the public. 
At this time we encourage input in the form of issues, concerns, ideas, 
and suggestions for the future management of Bandon Marsh, Nestucca 
Bay, and Siletz Bay Refuges.
    We will conduct an environmental review of this project and prepare 
an EA in accordance with the requirements of the National Environmental 
Policy Act of 1969, as amended (NEPA) (42 U.S.C.

[[Page 73122]]

4321 et seq.); NEPA regulations (40 CFR parts 1500-1508); other 
appropriate Federal laws and regulations; and our policies and 
procedures for compliance with those laws and regulations.

Bandon Marsh, Nestucca Bay, and Siletz Bay National Wildlife Refuges

    Bandon Marsh NWR was established in 1983, with the acquisition of 
289 acres of salt marsh, mudflats, and tidal sloughs. The Bandon Marsh 
Unit is located near the mouth of the Coquille River, with 
approximately 75 percent of the Unit within the city limits of Bandon, 
Oregon. The 582-acre Ni-les'tun Unit, established in 2000, includes 400 
acres of historic salt marsh that is currently being restored to tidal 
action. The Ni-les'tun Unit is located on the east side of Highway 101 
on the north bank of the Coquille River. The total land base of Bandon 
Marsh NWR is 889 acres.
    The purpose for establishing Bandon Marsh NWR was ``for the 
preservation and enhancement of the highly significant wildlife habitat 
of the area known as Bandon Marsh, in the estuary of the Coquille River 
* * * for the protection of migratory waterfowl, numerous species of 
shorebirds, and fish, including Chinook and silver salmon, and to 
provide opportunity for wildlife-oriented recreation and nature study 
on the marsh * * *'' (95 Stat. 1709, dated Dec 29, 1981). The Ni-
les'tun Unit was added to Bandon Marsh NWR in order to (1) protect and 
restore intertidal marsh, freshwater marsh, and riparian areas to 
provide a diversity of habitats for migratory birds, including 
waterfowl, shorebirds, wading birds, and songbirds; (2) restore 
intertidal marsh habitat for anadromous fish such as the threatened 
coho salmon, chinook, chum salmon, steelhead, and cutthroat trout; (3) 
protect and restore habitat for species listed under the Endangered 
Species Act as threatened or endangered; and (4) provide wildlife-
dependent public use opportunities compatible with refuge purposes.
    Nestucca Bay NWR is located near Pacific City and Neskowin in 
Tillamook County, Oregon. The refuge was established in 1991 with the 
acquisition of a 384-acre dairy farm, and has since expanded to 818.5 
acres. The primary need for establishing Nestucca Bay NWR was to 
protect high-quality coastal habitats for dusky Canada geese and 
threatened Aleutian Canada geese (delisted in 2001); other endangered 
and threatened species; and a variety of other migratory waterfowl, 
shorebirds, raptors, songbirds, anadromous fish, and other wildlife 
while preserving part of Oregon's biodiversity. In 2002, the refuge was 
expanded to include the Neskowin Marsh Unit (222.6 acres acquired), 
located about 2.5 miles south of the Nestucca Bay Refuge Unit near the 
community of Neskowin, Oregon. Neskowin Marsh incorporates unique 
freshwater wetland and bog habitats and wildlife resources not found 
within the initial refuge boundary.
    Siletz Bay NWR is located near Lincoln City on the central coast of 
Oregon. The refuge was established in 1991 with a donation of 46 acres 
of tidally muted salt marsh. The approved acquisition refuge boundary 
totals 1,936 acres and encompasses the northern tip of the Siletz spit, 
vegetated and unvegetated tidelands of the bay, and a portion of the 
diked former tidelands of the Siletz River floodplain. Approximately 
1,060 acres within the authorized boundary are State-owned tidelands. 
Currently, refuge lands total 568 acres. The primary need for 
establishing this refuge was to protect coastal wetland habitats and 
upland buffers for a variety of waterfowl, shorebirds, marine mammals, 
endangered species, raptors, songbirds, fish, and other wildlife. The 
refuge serves to protect the remaining coastal wetlands and uplands 
adjacent to Siletz Bay from rapidly encroaching development, and 
management emphasis has been to enhance and restore wetland and upland 
habitats for a variety of estuarine-dependent fish and wildlife 
species.

Scoping: Preliminary Issues, Concerns, and Opportunities

    We have identified preliminary issues, concerns, and opportunities 
that we may address in the CCP. We have briefly summarized these issues 
below. During public scoping, we may identify additional issues.
    Bandon Marsh NWR Preliminary Issues: What actions should the 
Service take to sustain and restore priority species and habitats on 
this refuge over the next 15 years? Based upon the refuge's priority 
fish and wildlife species, which habitats would be monitored and 
managed to control invasive species? What management options should the 
refuge consider for restoration of the degraded upland forest and 
grassland? What possibilities exist for enhancing existing or adding 
additional wildlife-dependent recreational opportunities, including 
wildlife observation trails and/or photography points? Which areas/
habitats of the refuge should be managed as undisturbed wildlife 
sanctuary areas (closed to the public) and which areas should be open 
to public use? Should the refuge consider changes to the Bandon Marsh 
NWR waterfowl hunting program? Would allowing hunting and other 
wildlife-dependent recreational uses in new areas (e.g., Ni-les'tun 
Unit) have detrimental effects on the refuge's ability to provide 
adequate undisturbed quality wintering habitat for waterfowl and other 
wildlife? Is there enough use of the refuge by migrating waterfowl to 
provide a quality hunting program?
    Nestucca Bay NWR Preliminary Issues: What actions should the 
Service take to sustain and restore priority species and habitats on 
this refuge over the next 15 years? Based upon the refuge's priority 
fish and wildlife species, which are the priority habitats to monitor 
for invasive species, and what is the range of Integrated Pest 
Management strategies that should be considered to reduce the incidence 
and spread of invasive species? Should the Service consider restoring 
some pastures at Nestucca Bay NWR to tidal marsh, and what effect would 
this have on the refuge's ability to provide wintering habitat for 
geese and reduce goose depredation on neighboring private lands? Should 
the Cannery Hill Unit at Nestucca Bay NWR be managed specifically to 
restore former coastal prairie, and if so, how much emphasis should be 
placed on specific needs of the threatened Oregon silverspot butterfly 
within a larger coastal prairie restoration plan? What options should 
be considered for the old roadbed through Neskowin Marsh (tsunami 
escape route) if it is found to be impacting water flows through 
Neskowin Marsh? Should the Service consider designating Neskowin Marsh 
as a Research Natural Area? What possibilities exist for adding or 
enhancing existing wildlife-dependent recreational opportunities on 
Nestucca Bay NWR? Are existing refuge access points and uses adequate 
and do they provide a quality experience? Should the refuge consider 
establishing waterfowl hunting programs at Nestucca Bay NWR? Can the 
level of migrating waterfowl use on Nestucca Bay NWR support a quality 
hunting program?
    Siletz Bay NWR Preliminary Issues: What actions should the Service 
take to sustain and restore priority species and habitats on this 
refuge over the next 15 years? Based upon the refuge's priority fish 
and wildlife species, which habitats are most important to monitor for 
invasive species? What partnering possibilities exist for treatment of 
aquatic invasive species such as smooth cordgrass and New Zealand mud 
snail? Can wetlands currently hampered by fish passage barriers and 
other issues be restored, and if so, how should the

[[Page 73123]]

Service prioritize them? What opportunities exist for adding or 
enhancing existing wildlife-dependent recreational opportunities and 
access points? Which areas of the refuge should be managed as 
undisturbed sanctuary areas and which areas should be considered for 
public access? Should the refuge consider establishing a waterfowl 
hunting program at Siletz Bay NWR? Would waterfowl hunting and other 
wildlife-dependent recreational activities have detrimental effects on 
the refuge's ability to provide adequate undisturbed quality wintering 
habitat for waterfowl? Is there enough use of the refuge by migrating 
waterfowl to support a quality hunting program? Should the refuge 
consider enhancing the currently offered seasonal opportunities to 
observe wildlife via guided canoe/kayak excursion through the refuge?

Public Meetings

    We will hold the following public meetings. For more information, 
contact the person under FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                  Date                               Time                                                  Location
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
November 29, 2010.......................  6-9 p.m..................  Lincoln City Community Center, 2150 NE. Oar Place, Lincoln City, OR 97367.
November 30, 2010.......................  6-9 p.m..................  Kiawanda Community Center, 34600 Cape Kiawanda Drive, Pacific City, OR 97135.
December 2, 2010........................  6-9 p.m..................  Bandon Community Center, 1200 11th Street SW., Bandon, OR 97411.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Public Availability of Comments

    Before including your address, phone number, e-mail address, or 
other personal identifying information in your comment, you should be 
aware that your entire comment--including your personal identifying 
information--may be made publicly available at any time. While you can 
ask us in your comment to withhold your personal identifying 
information from public review, we cannot guarantee that we will be 
able to do so.

    Dated: October 28, 2010.
Theresa E. Rabot,
Acting Regional Director, Region 1, Portland, Oregon.
[FR Doc. 2010-30063 Filed 11-26-10; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4310-55-P