National Natural Landmark Designations, 69120-69121 [2010-28426]

Download as PDF 69120 Federal Register / Vol. 75, No. 217 / Wednesday, November 10, 2010 / Notices Improvement Standards Insulation: Crawl Space .............. Duct Sealing ................................ Skylight Replacement .................. Door Replacement ...................... Storm Doors ................................ Storm Windows ........................... Heating System Gas/Propane/Oil Boiler/Furnace. Air Conditioner ............................. Geothermal .................................. Water Heater ............................... (gas, propane, electric, tank less) Water Heater (solar) .................... Fuel Cells and Micro turbine Systems. Solar Panels (Photovoltaic Systems). Wind Turbine Residential ............ Roofs Metal & Asphalt ................ (BPI Reference: https://www.bpi.org/standards.aspx) Crawl space insulation or basement wall and rim joist insulation that is installed in accordance with BPI standards or other procedures approved by the Secretary and— (A) covers at least 500 square feet of crawl space or basement wall and adds at least— (i) R–19 of cavity insulation or R–15 of continuous insulation to existing crawl space insulation; or (ii) R–13 of cavity insulation or R–10 of continuous insulation to basement walls; and (B) fully covers the rim joist with at least R–10 of new continuous or R–13 of cavity insulation. (BPI Reference: https://www.bpi.org/standards.aspx) Duct sealing or replacement and sealing that— (A) is installed in accordance with BPI standards or other procedures approved by the Secretary; and (B) in the case of duct replacement and sealing, replaces and seals at least 50 percent of a distribution system of the home. (BPI Reference: https://www.bpi.org/standards.aspx) Reference: https://www1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/windowsvolumepurchase/ Skylight replacement that meets most recent Energy Star specifications. Door replacement that meets most recent Energy Star specifications. Storm doors that— • meet the most recent Energy Star specifications Storm windows that— • meet the requirements for low-e storm windows under the Department of Energy Windows Volume Purchase Program Heating system replacement that meets most recent Energy Star specifications. Air-source air conditioner or air-source heat pump replacement with a new unit that meets most recent Energy Star specifications. Heating or cooling system replacement with an Energy Star qualified geothermal heat pump that meets Tier 2 efficiency requirements and that is installed in accordance with ANSI/ACCA Standard 5 QI–2007. Replacement of a natural gas, propane, or electric water heater that meets most recent Energy Star specifications. Solar water heating property must be Energy Star Qualified, or certified by the Solar Rating and Certification Corporation or by comparable entity endorsed by the state in which the system is installed. Efficiency of at least 30% and must have a capacity of at least 0.5 kW. Photovoltaic systems must provide electricity for the residence, and must meet applicable fire and electrical code requirement. A wind turbine collects kinetic energy from the wind and converts it to electricity that is compatible with a home’s electrical system, and has a nameplate capacity of no more than 100 kilowatts. Metal or asphalt roofs that meet most recent Energy Star specifications. [FR Doc. 2010–28015 Filed 11–9–10; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4210–67–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Natural Landmark Designations National Park Service, Department of the Interior. ACTION: Public Notice of National Natural Landmark Designations. AGENCY: On January 16, 2009, then Secretary of the Interior Dirk Kempthorne designated the following National Natural Landmarks: Big Bone Lick, Boone County, Kentucky; Cave Without a Name, Kendall County, Texas; Chazy Fossil Reef, Grand Isle County, Vermont and Clinton County, New York; and Nottingham Park Serpentine Barrens, Chester County, PA FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Dr. Margaret Brooks, National Natural Landmark Program Manager, at 520– 791–6470. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Secretary of the Interior established the emcdonald on DSK2BSOYB1PROD with NOTICES SUMMARY: VerDate Mar<15>2010 18:25 Nov 09, 2010 Jkt 223001 National Natural Landmarks Program in 1962, under the authority of the Historic Sites Act of 1935 (16 U.S.C. 461 et seq.). The National Park Service manages this program using regulations found at 36 CFR part 62. Potential natural landmarks are identified in studies by the NPS and from other sources, evaluated by expert natural scientists, and if determined nationally significant, designated as landmarks by the Secretary of the Interior. When designated, a landmark is included in the National Registry of Natural Landmarks, which currently lists 586 National Natural Landmarks nationwide. Of the 586 listed landmarks, half are administered solely by public agencies; i.e., Federal, State, county or municipal governments. Nearly one-third are owned solely by private parties. National Natural Landmark designation is not a land withdrawal, does not change the ownership of an area, does not dictate activity, and does not imply a right of public access. However, Federal agencies should consider impacts to the unique properties of these nationally significant PO 00000 Frm 00075 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 areas in carrying out their responsibilities under the National Environmental Policy Act (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.). Designation could result in State or local planning or land use implications. National Natural Landmark preservation is made possible by the long-term, voluntary commitments of public and private owners to protect the outstanding values of the areas. Information on the National Natural Landmarks Program can be found in 36 CFR part 62 or on the Internet at https://www.nature.nps.gov/ nnl. Site Descriptions: The Big Bone Lick site is located within the State of Kentucky, southwest of Cincinnati, Ohio, and is unique in the Interior Low Plateaus for its combination of salt springs and associated late Pleistocene bone beds. Many types of animals, especially large herbivores, were attracted to the springs for salt, and became mired in the mud. The site became a burial ground over time. Layers of disarticulated bones have been uncovered to depths of 30 feet. The site has been referred to as a major New World fossil locality, and E:\FR\FM\10NON1.SGM 10NON1 Federal Register / Vol. 75, No. 217 / Wednesday, November 10, 2010 / Notices plays an important role in the development of scientific thought on the concept of extinction and the relationship of geology/paleontology. Cave Without a Name is located outside of Boerne, Texas, and is significant for some of the largest and best examples of speleothems in the Edwards Plateau region. Blue speleothems found in the cave are the only ones known to exist in Texas and are exceedingly rare nationally. The cave also contains a rich fauna and significant paleontological deposits. The Chazy Fossil Reef is a surface exposure of an Ordovician fossil reef, approximately 450 million years old. It is significant as the oldest known occurrence of a biologically diverse fossil reef, the earliest appearance of fossil coral in a reef environment, and the first documented example of the ecological principle of faunal succession. The Nottingham Park Serpentine Barrens site is an outstanding example of the serpentine barren natural feature in the Piedmont Upland region. This feature is characterized by thin soils that are high in concentrations of metals which are toxic to many plant species. The site supports shallow serpentine soils, rock outcrops, and unique vegetation communities, including serpentine grasslands and open savanna that contain rare and endemic species. The site is within a county park and is actively used for science and education. Dated: December 22, 2009. Herbert C. Frost, Associate Director, Natural Resource Stewardship and Science. Editorial Note: This document was received in the Office of the Federal Register on November 5, 2010. [FR Doc. 2010–28426 Filed 11–9–10; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service emcdonald on DSK2BSOYB1PROD with NOTICES [2608–VFF] Information Collection Sent to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for Approval; OMB Control Number 1024–0252; The Interagency Access and Senior Pass Application Processes National Park Service, Interior. Notice; request for comments. AGENCY: ACTION: We (National Park Service) have sent an Information Collection Request (ICR) to OMB for review and approval. We summarize the ICR below SUMMARY: VerDate Mar<15>2010 18:25 Nov 09, 2010 Jkt 223001 and describe the nature of the collection and the estimated burden and cost. This ICR is scheduled to expire on February 28, 2011. We may not conduct or sponsor, and a person is not required to respond to, a collection of information unless it displays a currently valid OMB control number. Under OMB regulations, we may continue to conduct or sponsor this information collection while it is pending at OMB. DATES: You must submit comments on or before December 10, 2010. ADDRESSES: Send your comments and suggestions on this information collection to the Desk Officer for the Department of the Interior, Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, OMB, at (202) 395–5806 (fax) or OIRA_DOCKET@OMB.eop.gov (e-mail). Please provide a copy of your comments to NPS, WASO Recreation Fee Program Office, 1849 C St. NW, (2608), Washington, DC 20240; phone: (202) 513–7096; e-mail: brandon_flint@nps.gov, or by fax at (202) 371–2401. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: To request additional information about this ICR, contact Brandon Flint by mail, fax, or e-mail (see ADDRESSES) or by telephone at (202) 513–7096. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: OMB Control Number: 1024–0252. Title: The Interagency Access and Senior Pass Application Processes. Form Number: None. Type of Request: Revision of a current approved collection. Description of Respondents: Individuals applying for free access passes to multiple agency recreational areas based on disability or age. Respondent’s Obligation: Required to obtain or retain benefits. Frequency of Collection: Once per respondent. Estimated Number of Respondents: 100,900. Estimated Number of Responses: 100,900. Completion Time per Response: 69,730 @ 5minutes (0.083 hours) and 31,170 @ 10 minutes (0.167 hours). Estimated Annual Burden Hours: 11,006. Estimated Annual Nonhour Burden Cost: $19,949. Abstract: The America the Beautiful— the National Parks and Federal Recreational Lands Access Pass and Senior Passes are free, lifetime Passes issued by the Bureau of Land Management, the Bureau of Reclamation, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the U.S. Forest Service, and the National Park Service. The Interagency Access Pass is available to citizens or PO 00000 Frm 00076 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 9990 69121 persons domiciled in the United States, regardless of age, who have a medical determination and documentation of permanent disability. The Interagency Senior Pass is available to citizens or persons domiciled in the United States who are 62 years of age or older. In the past, the processes to obtain these Passes required in-person application. The proposed revision to current policy creates processes for applicants to obtain either Pass through the mail. Standard Operating Procedures have been updated to reflect the change to allow applicants to submit applications by mail along with photo copies of identification verifying U.S. residency or citizenship and documentation of disability for the Interagency Access Pass or U.S. residency or citizenship, and age for the Interagency Senior Pass. The process for obtaining an Interagency Access or Senior Pass in person is not changing. Comments: On June 9, 2010, we published in the Federal Register (75 FR 32810–32811) a notice of our intent to request that OMB renew this information collection. In that notice, we solicited comments for 60 days, ending on August 9, 2010. We did not receive any comments in response to that notice. We again invite comments concerning this information collection on: • Whether or not the collection of information is necessary, including whether or not the information will have practical utility; • The accuracy of our estimate of the burden for this collection of information; • Ways to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; and • Ways to minimize the burden of the collection of information on respondents. Comments you submit in response to this notice are a matter of public record. Before including your address, phone number, e-mail address, or other personal identifying information in your comment, you should be aware that your entire comment, including your personal identifying information, may be made publicly available at any time. While you can ask OMB in your comment to withhold your personal identifying information from public review, we cannot guarantee it will be done. Dated: November 5, 2010. Robert Gordon, NPS, Information Collection Clearance Officer. [FR Doc. 2010–28429 Filed 11–9–10; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–52–P E:\FR\FM\10NON1.SGM 10NON1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 75, Number 217 (Wednesday, November 10, 2010)]
[Notices]
[Pages 69120-69121]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2010-28426]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR


National Natural Landmark Designations

AGENCY: National Park Service, Department of the Interior.

ACTION: Public Notice of National Natural Landmark Designations.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: On January 16, 2009, then Secretary of the Interior Dirk 
Kempthorne designated the following National Natural Landmarks: Big 
Bone Lick, Boone County, Kentucky; Cave Without a Name, Kendall County, 
Texas; Chazy Fossil Reef, Grand Isle County, Vermont and Clinton 
County, New York; and Nottingham Park Serpentine Barrens, Chester 
County, PA

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Dr. Margaret Brooks, National Natural 
Landmark Program Manager, at 520-791-6470.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Secretary of the Interior established 
the National Natural Landmarks Program in 1962, under the authority of 
the Historic Sites Act of 1935 (16 U.S.C. 461 et seq.). The National 
Park Service manages this program using regulations found at 36 CFR 
part 62. Potential natural landmarks are identified in studies by the 
NPS and from other sources, evaluated by expert natural scientists, and 
if determined nationally significant, designated as landmarks by the 
Secretary of the Interior. When designated, a landmark is included in 
the National Registry of Natural Landmarks, which currently lists 586 
National Natural Landmarks nationwide. Of the 586 listed landmarks, 
half are administered solely by public agencies; i.e., Federal, State, 
county or municipal governments. Nearly one-third are owned solely by 
private parties.
    National Natural Landmark designation is not a land withdrawal, 
does not change the ownership of an area, does not dictate activity, 
and does not imply a right of public access. However, Federal agencies 
should consider impacts to the unique properties of these nationally 
significant areas in carrying out their responsibilities under the 
National Environmental Policy Act (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.). Designation 
could result in State or local planning or land use implications. 
National Natural Landmark preservation is made possible by the long-
term, voluntary commitments of public and private owners to protect the 
outstanding values of the areas. Information on the National Natural 
Landmarks Program can be found in 36 CFR part 62 or on the Internet at 
https://www.nature.nps.gov/nnl.
    Site Descriptions:
    The Big Bone Lick site is located within the State of Kentucky, 
southwest of Cincinnati, Ohio, and is unique in the Interior Low 
Plateaus for its combination of salt springs and associated late 
Pleistocene bone beds. Many types of animals, especially large 
herbivores, were attracted to the springs for salt, and became mired in 
the mud. The site became a burial ground over time. Layers of 
disarticulated bones have been uncovered to depths of 30 feet. The site 
has been referred to as a major New World fossil locality, and

[[Page 69121]]

plays an important role in the development of scientific thought on the 
concept of extinction and the relationship of geology/paleontology.
    Cave Without a Name is located outside of Boerne, Texas, and is 
significant for some of the largest and best examples of speleothems in 
the Edwards Plateau region. Blue speleothems found in the cave are the 
only ones known to exist in Texas and are exceedingly rare nationally. 
The cave also contains a rich fauna and significant paleontological 
deposits.
    The Chazy Fossil Reef is a surface exposure of an Ordovician fossil 
reef, approximately 450 million years old. It is significant as the 
oldest known occurrence of a biologically diverse fossil reef, the 
earliest appearance of fossil coral in a reef environment, and the 
first documented example of the ecological principle of faunal 
succession.
    The Nottingham Park Serpentine Barrens site is an outstanding 
example of the serpentine barren natural feature in the Piedmont Upland 
region. This feature is characterized by thin soils that are high in 
concentrations of metals which are toxic to many plant species. The 
site supports shallow serpentine soils, rock outcrops, and unique 
vegetation communities, including serpentine grasslands and open 
savanna that contain rare and endemic species. The site is within a 
county park and is actively used for science and education.

    Dated: December 22, 2009.
Herbert C. Frost,
Associate Director, Natural Resource Stewardship and Science.

    Editorial Note: This document was received in the Office of the 
Federal Register on November 5, 2010.
[FR Doc. 2010-28426 Filed 11-9-10; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE P