Amendment of Class E Airspace; Charleston, SC, 67910-67911 [2010-27647]

Download as PDF WReier-Aviles on DSKGBLS3C1PROD with RULES 67910 Federal Register / Vol. 75, No. 213 / Thursday, November 4, 2010 / Rules and Regulations may contain personally identifiable information collected by other federal, state, local, tribal, foreign, or international government agencies. The Secretary of Homeland Security has exempted this system from the following provisions of the Privacy Act, subject to limitations set forth in 5 U.S.C. 552a(c)(3) and (c)(4); (d); (e)(1), (e)(2), (e)(3), (e)(4)(G), (e)(4)(H), (e)(5) and (e)(8); (f); and (g) pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 552a(j)(2). Additionally, the Secretary of Homeland Security has exempted this system from the following provisions of the Privacy Act, subject to limitations set forth in 5 U.S.C. 552a(c)(3); (d); (e)(1), (e)(4)(G), (e)(4)(H); and (f) pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 552a(k)(1), (k)(2) and (k)(5). Exemptions from these particular subsections are justified, on a case-by-case basis to be determined at the time a request is made, for the following reasons: (a) From subsection (c)(3) and (c)(4) (Accounting for Disclosures) because release of the accounting of disclosures could alert the subject of an investigation of an actual or potential criminal, civil, or regulatory violation, to the existence of the investigation; and reveal investigative interest on the part of DHS as well as the recipient agency. Disclosure of the accounting would therefore present a serious impediment to law enforcement efforts and/ or efforts to preserve national security. Disclosure of the accounting would also permit the individual who is the subject of a record to impede the investigation, tamper with witnesses or evidence, and avoid detection or apprehension, which would undermine the entire investigative process. (b) From subsection (d) (Access to Records) because access to the records contained in this system of records could inform the subject of an investigation of an actual or potential criminal, civil, or regulatory violation, to the existence of the investigation, and reveal investigative interest on the part of DHS or another agency. Access to the records could permit the individual who is the subject of a record to impede the investigation, tamper with witnesses or evidence, and avoid detection or apprehension. Amendment of the records could interfere with ongoing investigations and law enforcement activities and would impose an impossible administrative burden by requiring investigations to be continuously reinvestigated. In addition, permitting access and amendment to such information could disclose security-sensitive information that could be detrimental to homeland security. (c) From subsection (e)(1) (Relevancy and Necessity of Information) because in the course of investigations into potential violations of federal law, the accuracy of information obtained or introduced occasionally may be unclear or the information may not be strictly relevant or necessary to a specific investigation. In the interests of effective law enforcement, it is appropriate to retain all information that may aid in establishing patterns of unlawful activity. (d) From subsection (e)(2) (Collection of Information from Individuals) because requiring that information be collected from the subject of an investigation would alert the VerDate Mar<15>2010 14:43 Nov 03, 2010 Jkt 223001 subject as to the nature or existence of an investigation, thereby interfering with the related investigation and law enforcement activities. (e) From subsection (e)(3) (Notice to Subjects) because providing such detailed information would impede law enforcement in that it could compromise investigations by: revealing the existence of an otherwise confidential investigation and thereby providing an opportunity for the subject of an investigation to conceal evidence, alter patterns of behavior, or take other actions that could thwart investigative efforts; revealing the identity of witnesses in investigations thereby providing an opportunity for the subjects of the investigations or others to harass, intimidate, or otherwise interfere with the collection of evidence or other information from such witnesses; or revealing the identity of confidential informants, which would negatively affect the informants’ usefulness in any ongoing or future investigations and discourage members of the public from cooperating as confidential informants in any future investigations. (f) From subsections (e)(4)(G) and (e)(4)(H) (Agency Requirements) and (f) (Agency Rules), because portions of this system are exempt from the individual access provisions of subsection (d) for the reasons noted above, and therefore DHS is not required to establish rules or procedures with respect to such access. Providing notice to individuals with respect to existence of records pertaining to them in this system of records or otherwise setting up procedures pursuant to which individuals may access and view records pertaining to themselves in the system would undermine investigative efforts and reveal the identities of witnesses, potential witnesses, and confidential informants. (g) From subsection (e)(5) (Collection of Information) because in the collection of information for law enforcement purposes it is impossible to determine in advance what information is accurate, relevant, timely, and complete. Compliance with (e)(5) would preclude DHS agents from using their investigative training and exercise of good judgment to both conduct and report on investigations. (h) From subsection (e)(8) (Notice on Individuals) because compliance would interfere with DHS’ ability to obtain, serve, and issue subpoenas, warrants and other law enforcement mechanisms that may be filed under seal, and could result in disclosure of investigative techniques, procedures, and evidence. (i) From subsection (g) (Civil Remedies) to the extent that the system is exempt from other specific subsections of the Privacy Act relating to individuals’ rights to access and amend their records contained in the system. Therefore, DHS is not required to establish rules or procedures pursuant to which individuals may seek a civil remedy for the agency’s refusals to amend a record; refusal to comply with a request for access to records; failure to maintain accurate, relevant, timely, and complete records; or failure to otherwise comply with an individual’s right to access or amend records. * PO 00000 * * Frm 00002 * Fmt 4700 * Sfmt 4700 Dated: October 6, 2010. Mary Ellen Callahan, Chief Privacy Officer, Department of Homeland Security. [FR Doc. 2010–27830 Filed 11–3–10; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 9110–9B–P DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 [Docket No. FAA–2010–0817; Airspace Docket No. 10–ASO–31] Amendment of Class E Airspace; Charleston, SC Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. AGENCY: This action amends Class E Airspace at Charleston, SC, by removing the East Cooper Airport from the airspace description. The East Cooper Airport has been renamed Mt. Pleasant Regional Airport-Faison Field, Mt. Pleasant, SC, and established under separate rulemaking. This amendment is necessary for the safe navigation of our National Airspace System. DATES: Effective 0901 UTC, December 6, 2010. The Director of the Federal Register approves this incorporation by reference action under title 1, Code of Federal Regulations, part 51, subject to the annual revision of FAA Order 7400.9 and publication of conforming amendments. SUMMARY: FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Melinda Giddens, Operations Support Group, Eastern Service Center, Federal Aviation Administration, P.O. Box 20636, Atlanta, Georgia 30320; telephone (404) 305–5610. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: History The airspace description for Charleston, SC, is a combination of the Charleston AFB/International Airport, the Charleston Executive Airport, and the East Cooper Airport. The East Cooper Airport has been renamed Mt. Pleasant Regional Airport-Faison Field, Mt. Pleasant, SC, and separate rulemaking has been established for the airport (75 FR 16335). To eliminate confusion, all references to the East Cooper Airport is being removed from the legal description of Class E airspace, Charleston, SC. The Rule This amendment to Title 14, Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) part 71 E:\FR\FM\04NOR1.SGM 04NOR1 Federal Register / Vol. 75, No. 213 / Thursday, November 4, 2010 / Rules and Regulations WReier-Aviles on DSKGBLS3C1PROD with RULES amends the Class E airspace extending upward from 700 feet above the surface at Charleston, SC, by removing the East Cooper Airport from the legal description. Since this is an administrative change that does not involve a change in the dimensions or operating requirements for that airspace, notice and public procedures under 5 U.S.C. 553(b) are unnecessary. The Class E airspace designations are published in Paragraph 6005 of FAA order 7400.9U, signed August 18, 2010, and effective September 15, 2010, which is incorporated by reference in 14 CFR 71.1. The Class E airspace designations listed in this document will be published subsequently in the Order. The FAA has determined that this regulation only involves an established body of technical regulations for which frequent and routine amendments are necessary to keep them operationally current, is non-controversial and unlikely to result in adverse or negative comments. It, therefore, (1) is not a ‘‘significant regulatory action’’ under Executive Order 12866; (2) is not a ‘‘significant rule’’ under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of a Regulatory Evaluation as the anticipated impact is so minimal. Since this is a routine matter that will only affect air traffic procedures and air navigation, it is certified that this rule, when promulgated, will not have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small entities under the criteria of the Regulatory Flexibility Act. The FAA’s authority to issue rules regarding aviation safety is found in Title 49 of the United States Code. Subtitle I, Section 106 describes the authority of the FAA Administrator. Subtitle VII, Aviation Programs, describes in more detail the scope of the agency’s authority. This rulemaking is promulgated under the authority described in Subtitle VII, Part A, Subpart I, Section 40103. Under that section, the FAA is charged with prescribing regulations to assign the use of airspace necessary to ensure the safety of aircraft and the efficient use of airspace. This regulation is within the scope of that authority as it amends controlled airspace at Charleston, SC. Lists of Subjects in 14 CFR Part 71 Airspace, Incorporation by reference, Navigation (air). Adoption of the Amendment In consideration of the foregoing, the Federal Aviation Administration amends 14 CFR Part 71 as follows: VerDate Mar<15>2010 16:46 Nov 03, 2010 Jkt 223001 PART 71—DESIGNATION OF CLASS A, B, C, D, AND E AIRSPACE AREAS; AIR TRAFFIC SERVICE ROUTES; AND REPORTING POINTS 1. The authority citation for Part 71 continues to read as follows: ■ Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g); 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959– 1963 Comp., p. 389. § 71.1 [Amended] 2. The incorporation by reference in 14 CFR 71.1 of Federal Aviation Administration Order 7400.9U, Airspace Designations and Reporting Points, signed August 18, 2010, and effective September 15, 2010, is amended as follows: ■ Paragraph 6005 Class E airspace areas extending upward from 700 feet or more above the surface of the earth. * * * * * ASO SC E5 Charleston, SC [Amended] Charleston AFB/International Airport, SC (Lat. 32°53′56″ N., long. 80°02′26″ W.) Charleston Executive Airport (Lat. 32°42′04″ N., long. 80°00′09″ W.) That airspace extending upward from 700 feet above the surface within a 10-mile radius of Charleston AFB/International Airport and within a 7-mile radius of Charleston Executive Airport. Issued in College Park, Georgia, on October 19, 2010. Mark D. Ward, Manager, Operations Support Group, Eastern Service Center, Air Traffic Organization. [FR Doc. 2010–27647 Filed 11–3–10; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–13–P DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 [Docket No. FAA–2010–0052; Airspace Docket No. 10–AEA–19] Amendment of Class E Airspace; Jeannette, PA Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. AGENCY: This action amends Class E Airspace at Jeannette, PA. Jeannette District Hospital will no longer be using the heliport therefore reference to the Jeannette District Hospital Heliport in the legal description is being removed. The boundaries, altitudes and operating requirements will not change. DATES: Effective 0901 UTC, December 6, 2010. The Director of the Federal Register approves this incorporation by reference SUMMARY: PO 00000 Frm 00003 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 67911 action under title 1, Code of Federal Regulations, part 51, subject to the annual revision of FAA, Order 7400.9 and publication of conforming amendments. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Richard Horrocks, Operations Support Group, Eastern Service Center, Federal Aviation Administration, P.O. Box 20636, Atlanta, Georgia 30320; telephone (404) 305–5588. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: History The Point in Space in the legal description of the Class E airspace area for Jeannette, PA serves both the Monsour Medical Center Heliport and the Jeannette District Hospital Heliport. The FAA is removing reference only to the Jeannette District Hospital Heliport. This change does not affect the boundaries, altitudes, or operating requirements of the airspace, therefore, notice and public procedures under 5 U.S.C. 553(b) are unnecessary. The Rule This amendment to Title 14, Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) part 71 amends the Class E airspace extending upward from 700 feet above the surface at Jeannette, PA, by removing the Jeannette District Hospital Heliport reference from the legal description. The Point in Space within the legal description will continue to serve Monsour Medical Center Heliport. The Class E airspace designations are published in Paragraph 6005 of FAA order 7400.9U, signed August 18, 2010, and effective September 15, 2010, which is incorporated by reference in 14 CFR 71.1. The Class E airspace designations listed in this document will be published subsequently in the Order. The FAA has determined that this regulation only involves an established body of technical regulations for which frequent and routine amendments are necessary to keep them operationally current, is non-controversial and unlikely to result in adverse or negative comments. It, therefore, (1) is not a ‘‘significant regulatory action’’ under Executive Order 12866; (2) is not a ‘‘significant rule’’ under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of a Regulatory Evaluation as the anticipated impact is so minimal. Since this is a routine matter that will only affect air traffic procedures and air navigation, it is certified that this rule, when promulgated, will not have a significant economic impact on a substantial E:\FR\FM\04NOR1.SGM 04NOR1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 75, Number 213 (Thursday, November 4, 2010)]
[Rules and Regulations]
[Pages 67910-67911]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2010-27647]


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DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

Federal Aviation Administration

14 CFR Part 71

[Docket No. FAA-2010-0817; Airspace Docket No. 10-ASO-31]


Amendment of Class E Airspace; Charleston, SC

AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT.

ACTION: Final rule.

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SUMMARY: This action amends Class E Airspace at Charleston, SC, by 
removing the East Cooper Airport from the airspace description. The 
East Cooper Airport has been renamed Mt. Pleasant Regional Airport-
Faison Field, Mt. Pleasant, SC, and established under separate 
rulemaking. This amendment is necessary for the safe navigation of our 
National Airspace System.

DATES: Effective 0901 UTC, December 6, 2010. The Director of the 
Federal Register approves this incorporation by reference action under 
title 1, Code of Federal Regulations, part 51, subject to the annual 
revision of FAA Order 7400.9 and publication of conforming amendments.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Melinda Giddens, Operations Support 
Group, Eastern Service Center, Federal Aviation Administration, P.O. 
Box 20636, Atlanta, Georgia 30320; telephone (404) 305-5610.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

History

    The airspace description for Charleston, SC, is a combination of 
the Charleston AFB/International Airport, the Charleston Executive 
Airport, and the East Cooper Airport. The East Cooper Airport has been 
renamed Mt. Pleasant Regional Airport-Faison Field, Mt. Pleasant, SC, 
and separate rulemaking has been established for the airport (75 FR 
16335). To eliminate confusion, all references to the East Cooper 
Airport is being removed from the legal description of Class E 
airspace, Charleston, SC.

The Rule

    This amendment to Title 14, Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) 
part 71

[[Page 67911]]

amends the Class E airspace extending upward from 700 feet above the 
surface at Charleston, SC, by removing the East Cooper Airport from the 
legal description. Since this is an administrative change that does not 
involve a change in the dimensions or operating requirements for that 
airspace, notice and public procedures under 5 U.S.C. 553(b) are 
unnecessary.
    The Class E airspace designations are published in Paragraph 6005 
of FAA order 7400.9U, signed August 18, 2010, and effective September 
15, 2010, which is incorporated by reference in 14 CFR 71.1. The Class 
E airspace designations listed in this document will be published 
subsequently in the Order.
    The FAA has determined that this regulation only involves an 
established body of technical regulations for which frequent and 
routine amendments are necessary to keep them operationally current, is 
non-controversial and unlikely to result in adverse or negative 
comments. It, therefore, (1) is not a ``significant regulatory action'' 
under Executive Order 12866; (2) is not a ``significant rule'' under 
DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 
1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of a Regulatory Evaluation 
as the anticipated impact is so minimal. Since this is a routine matter 
that will only affect air traffic procedures and air navigation, it is 
certified that this rule, when promulgated, will not have a significant 
economic impact on a substantial number of small entities under the 
criteria of the Regulatory Flexibility Act.
    The FAA's authority to issue rules regarding aviation safety is 
found in Title 49 of the United States Code. Subtitle I, Section 106 
describes the authority of the FAA Administrator. Subtitle VII, 
Aviation Programs, describes in more detail the scope of the agency's 
authority.
    This rulemaking is promulgated under the authority described in 
Subtitle VII, Part A, Subpart I, Section 40103. Under that section, the 
FAA is charged with prescribing regulations to assign the use of 
airspace necessary to ensure the safety of aircraft and the efficient 
use of airspace. This regulation is within the scope of that authority 
as it amends controlled airspace at Charleston, SC.

Lists of Subjects in 14 CFR Part 71

    Airspace, Incorporation by reference, Navigation (air).

Adoption of the Amendment

    In consideration of the foregoing, the Federal Aviation 
Administration amends 14 CFR Part 71 as follows:

PART 71--DESIGNATION OF CLASS A, B, C, D, AND E AIRSPACE AREAS; AIR 
TRAFFIC SERVICE ROUTES; AND REPORTING POINTS

0
1. The authority citation for Part 71 continues to read as follows:

    Authority:  49 U.S.C. 106(g); 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 
24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389.


Sec.  71.1  [Amended]

0
2. The incorporation by reference in 14 CFR 71.1 of Federal Aviation 
Administration Order 7400.9U, Airspace Designations and Reporting 
Points, signed August 18, 2010, and effective September 15, 2010, is 
amended as follows:

Paragraph 6005 Class E airspace areas extending upward from 700 
feet or more above the surface of the earth.

* * * * *

ASO SC E5 Charleston, SC [Amended]

Charleston AFB/International Airport, SC
    (Lat. 32[deg]53'56'' N., long. 80[deg]02'26'' W.)
Charleston Executive Airport
    (Lat. 32[deg]42'04'' N., long. 80[deg]00'09'' W.)

    That airspace extending upward from 700 feet above the surface 
within a 10-mile radius of Charleston AFB/International Airport and 
within a 7-mile radius of Charleston Executive Airport.

    Issued in College Park, Georgia, on October 19, 2010.
Mark D. Ward,
Manager, Operations Support Group, Eastern Service Center, Air Traffic 
Organization.
[FR Doc. 2010-27647 Filed 11-3-10; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4910-13-P