Notice of Intent To Request New Information Collection, 63798-63800 [2010-26083]

Download as PDF 63798 Notices Federal Register Vol. 75, No. 200 Monday, October 18, 2010 This section of the FEDERAL REGISTER contains documents other than rules or proposed rules that are applicable to the public. Notices of hearings and investigations, committee meetings, agency decisions and rulings, delegations of authority, filing of petitions and applications and agency statements of organization and functions are examples of documents appearing in this section. ADMINISTRATIVE CONFERENCE OF THE UNITED STATES Notice of Public Meeting of the Committee on Administration Administrative Conference of the United States. ACTION: Notice of meeting. AGENCY: Notice is hereby given that the Administrative Conference of the United States will host a public meeting of the Committee on Administration of the Assembly of the Conference on Wednesday, November 3, 2010 from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. to consider a report examining the application of ethics rules to employees of government contractors. To facilitate public participation, the Administrative Conference is inviting public comment on the report to be considered at the meeting, to be submitted in writing no later than October 29, 2010. DATES: Meeting to be held November 3, 2010. Comments must be received by October 29, 2010. ADDRESSES: Meeting to be held at Administrative Conference of the United States, Suite 706 South, 1120 20th Street, NW., Washington, DC 20036. Submit comments to either of the following: (1) E-mail: Comments@acus.gov, with ‘‘Ethics Rules’’ in the subject line; or (2) Mail: Ethics Rules Comments, Administrative Conference of the United States, Suite 706 South, 1120 20th Street, NW., Washington, DC 20036. SUMMARY: mstockstill on DSKH9S0YB1PROD with NOTICES FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Reeve T. Bull, Designated Federal Officer, Administrative Conference of the United States, Suite 706 South, 1120 20th Street, NW., Washington, DC 20036; Telephone 202–480–2080. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Administrative Conference of the United States (ACUS) is charged with developing recommendations for the VerDate Mar<15>2010 16:45 Oct 15, 2010 Jkt 223001 improvement of Federal administrative procedures (5 U.S.C. 591). The Conference has engaged a Professor of Law at Washington University in St. Louis School of Law, Kathleen Clark, to research and prepare a report regarding whether ethics regulations analogous to those applicable to government employees should apply to government contractors and, if so, how such regulations should be imposed (the ‘‘Ethics Report’’). A copy of the Ethics Report will be available at http://www.acus.gov. The Committee on Administration has been tasked with reviewing this report and developing recommendations for consideration by the Assembly of the Conference. From 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. on November 3, 2010, the Committee on Administration will hold a meeting to consider the Ethics Report and formulate appropriate recommendations in response thereto. This meeting will be open to the public and may end prior to 4 p.m. if business is concluded prior to that time. Members of the public are invited to attend the meeting in person, subject to space limitations, and the Conference will also provide remote public access to the meeting. Anyone who wishes to attend the meeting in person is asked to RSVP to Comments@acus.gov. Remote access information will be posted on the Conference’s Web site, http:// www.acus.gov, by no later than October 29, 2010, and will also be available by the same date by calling the phone number listed above. Members of the public who attend the Committee’s meeting may be permitted to speak only at the discretion of the Committee Chair, with unanimous approval of the Committee. The Conference welcomes the attendance of the public and will make every effort to accommodate persons with physical disabilities or special needs. If you need special accommodations due to a disability, please inform the Designated Federal Officer no later than 7 days in advance of the meeting using the contact information provided above. Members of the public may submit written comments on the report to either of the addresses listed above no later than October 29, 2010. All comments will be delivered to the Designated Federal Officer listed on this notice. The Designated Federal Officer will post all PO 00000 Frm 00001 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 comments that relate to the report on the Conference’s Web site after the close of the comments period. Dated: October 13, 2010. Paul R. Verkuil, Chairman. [FR Doc. 2010–26162 Filed 10–15–10; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 6110–01–P DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Economic Research Service Notice of Intent To Request New Information Collection Economic Research Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice and request for comments. AGENCY: In accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, this notice invites the general public and other public agencies to send comments regarding any aspect of this proposed information collection. This is a new collection to develop a Sampling Frame of Farm to School efforts. DATES: Written comments on this notice must be received on or before December 17, 2010 to be assured of consideration. ADDRESSES: Address all comments concerning this notice to Katherine Ralston, Food Economics Division, Economic Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, 1800 M St., NW., Room N2163, Washington, DC 20036–5801. Comments may also be submitted via fax to the attention of Katherine Ralston at 202–694–5663 or via e-mail to kralston@ers.usda.gov. Comments will also be accepted through the Federal eRulemaking Portal. Go to http://www.regulations.gov, and follow the online instructions for submitting comments electronically. All written comments will be open for public inspection at the office of the Economic Research Service during regular business hours (8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday) at 1800 M St., NW., Room N2163, Washington, DC 20036–5801. All responses to this notice will be summarized and included in the request for Office of Management and Budget approval. All comments will be a matter of public record. Comments are invited on: (a) Whether the proposed collection of information is necessary for the SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\18OCN1.SGM 18OCN1 Federal Register / Vol. 75, No. 200 / Monday, October 18, 2010 / Notices proper performance of the functions of the agency, including whether the information shall have practical utility; (b) the accuracy of the agency’s estimate of the burden of the proposed collection of information, including the validity of the methodology and assumptions used; (c) ways to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; and (d) ways to minimize the burden of the collection of information on those who are to respond, including use of appropriate automated, electronic, mechanical, or other technological collection techniques or other forms of information technology. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: For further information contact Katherine Ralston at the address in the preamble. Tel. 202–694–5463. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Census Survey of Farm to School Initiatives. OMB Number: 0536–XXXX. Expiration Date: Three years from the date of approval. Type of Request: New collection. mstockstill on DSKH9S0YB1PROD with NOTICES Abstract The Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008, also known as the 2008 Farm Bill, amended the National School Lunch Act to allow institutions receiving funds through that act and the Child Nutrition Act of 1966 to apply a geographic preference to the procurement of unprocessed locally grown or locally raised agricultural products. This amendment provides local institutions more flexibility and increases opportunities for USDA to promote local foods in the school meal programs. While this part of the 2008 Farm Bill has yet to be funded, USDA has taken action to explore the issue through the Farm to School Initiative. USDA recognizes the growing interest among school districts and communities to incorporate regionally and locally produced farm foods into school nutrition programs supported by USDA. USDA school nutrition programs include the National School Lunch Program (NSLP), the School Breakfast Program (SBP), the Special Milk Program (SMP), which funds milk for students without access to other meal programs, and the Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program (FFVP), which funds the purchase of fresh fruits and vegetables provided as free snacks to students in selected schools with the States’ highest percentages of students certified for free and reduced price meals. USDA is supporting Farm to School efforts through a number of initiatives, and continues to look for ways to help VerDate Mar<15>2010 16:45 Oct 15, 2010 Jkt 223001 facilitate this important connection. In late 2009, USDA established ‘‘Know Your Farmer, Know Your Food,’’ an initiative which focuses on the importance of understanding where our food comes from and how it gets to our plates. In response to the growing demand for Farm to School activities, the ‘‘USDA Farm to School Team’’ was developed out of the ‘‘Know Your Farmer, Know Your Food’’ Initiative. Successful Farm to School efforts have the potential to benefit multiple stakeholders, including the schools, the farmers, and the children. Through these efforts, schools are able to bring fresh, locally grown foods to school meal programs, while local farmers are able to attract new business by selling fruits and vegetables to schools in their area. In addition, activities surrounding Farm to School often help children learn essential lessons about how farm fresh produce is grown and its role in a nutritious, healthful diet. Introducing local farm products in both the classroom and the cafeteria allows children to experience the value and appeal of a diet rich in fresh fruits and vegetables. Many Farm to School activities include bringing students to farms and farmers into classrooms, as well as creating school gardens that both teach students about agriculture and support the meal program. While anecdotal evidence and case studies suggest that Farm to School activities improve students’ nutrition and local economies, more representative objective research to measure these benefits and identify factors associated with success and costeffectiveness are hampered by the lack of data. Surveys of school food authorities (SFAs) have included questions to indicate whether the SFA purchases locally, but the surveys have not included questions about the nature of the activities, and the samples of SFAs have not been large enough to yield a sufficient sample of SFAs implementing Farm to School activities for statistical analysis. The information to be collected by the Farm to School Census Survey is necessary to develop a stratified sampling frame for more detailed future surveys. Currently, the National Farm to School Network, through the Urban and Environmental Policy Institute at Occidental College, maintains the only national database of Farm to School initiatives. This database is created by information entered by programs directly on to the National Farm to School Network’s Web site, and as a result is not a complete representation of Farm to School activity in the country. The Census Survey will contact PO 00000 Frm 00002 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 63799 50 State agriculture departments, 50 State education departments, 50 State Farm to School coordinators, and 50 State cooperative extension offices to develop a list of school districts involved in Farm to School activities and their contact information. School districts identified on this list will be contacted to the following collect information on key characteristics: ♦ Contact information, including county, school district name and zip code. ♦ School nutrition programs available in the SFA or school (NSLP, SBP, SMP, and/or FFVP). ♦ When the efforts started. ♦ Types of activities: Æ Local foods week or harvest of the month. Æ Use of geographic preference in procurement. Æ Direct local procurement for meals and/or snacks, including snacks supported by the Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program. Æ Use of commodity dollars for locally sourced items through State Farm to School program. Æ Requests for local sourcing through Department of Defense produce procurement (DoD Fresh). Æ School gardens for snacks, meals or other use. Æ Curriculum and classroom education out of classroom activities, farm tours. Æ Agriscience programs. ♦ Number of schools participating. ♦ Number of children participating, if not all. ♦ Number of farmers/distributors supplying local product. ♦ Most common foods purchased locally. ♦ Requirement of Good Agriculture Practices (GAP) certification. ♦ Level of external grant funding received specific for Farm to School related efforts. Information on other potential stratification characteristics will be obtained by matching data from the Common Core Data to the database of SFAs implementing Farm to School activities and other geo-coded data. Data collection instruments will be kept as simple and respondent-friendly as possible. Responses are voluntary and will be made publicly available only with permission of the respondent. Affected Public: Respondent groups include: (1) State agriculture department officials, (2) State education department officials, (3) State cooperative extension officials, (4) State Farm to School coordinators, and (5) local Farm to School coordinators. Estimated Number of Respondents: The estimated number of respondents E:\FR\FM\18OCN1.SGM 18OCN1 63800 Federal Register / Vol. 75, No. 200 / Monday, October 18, 2010 / Notices for the sampling frame includes: (1) 50 State agriculture department representatives, (2) 50 State department of education representatives, (3) 50 State cooperative extension representatives, (4) up to 50 State Farm to School coordinators, and (5) up to 1,000 local Farm to School coordinators. Ninety percent of each group is expected to respond. Estimates of the percentages of respondents who will agree to complete the interview are based on previous experience with developing the currently available database of farm to school initiatives. Estimated Number of Responses per Respondent: 20 for State-level respondents, 10 for local-level respondents. Estimated responses per respondent are as follows: Up to 200 State officials will be asked to identify local school districts which participate in Farm to School activities and provide contact information. An average of 20 school districts per respondent will be identified. An estimated 1,000 school districts will be contacted to obtain information on 10 key characteristics. (Note: identified school districts will overlap, so that redundant phone information serves as validation). Estimated Total Responses: 14,000. Estimated Time per Response: We estimate the time per response as 0.05 hours (3 minutes) for State-level respondents to provide contact information for each school district within the state, and 0.25 hours (15 minutes) per question for local-level respondents to provide information on each key characteristic, on average. These estimates of respondent burden are based on experience with previous data collection efforts for Farm to School initiatives. Estimated Total Burden on Respondents: 2,700 hours. See the table below for the estimated total annual burden for each instrument. REPORTING BURDEN Estimated number of respondents Description Responses per respondent Total annual responses Estimated average number of hours per response Estimated total annual hours of response burden Request for programs in the state ....................................... Key Characteristics .............................................................. 200 1,000 20 10 4,000 10,000 .05 .25 200 2,500 Total responding burden ............................................... 1,200 ........................ 14,000 ........................ 2,700 Dated: September 15, 2010. Katherine R. Smith, Administrator, Economic Research Service. [FR Doc. 2010–26083 Filed 10–15–10; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3410–18–P DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Information Collection; Commercial Use of the Woodsy Owl Symbol AGENCY: ACTION: Forest Service, USDA. Notice; request for comment. In accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, the Forest Service is seeking comments from all interested individuals and organizations on the currently approved information collection, Commercial Use of the Woodsy Owl Symbol. SUMMARY: Comments must be received in writing on or before December 17, 2010 to be assured of consideration. Comments received after that date will be considered to the extent practicable. mstockstill on DSKH9S0YB1PROD with NOTICES DATES: Comments concerning this notice should be addressed to the Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Office of the Conservation Education Program, Program Manager National Symbols, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW., Mail Stop 1147, Washington, DC 20250–1147. ADDRESSES: VerDate Mar<15>2010 16:45 Oct 15, 2010 Jkt 223001 Comments also may be submitted via e-mail to ivelez@fs.fed.us. The public may inspect comments received at the Office of Conservation Education Program, Room 1C, U.S. Forest Service, Yates Building, 201 14th Street, SW., Washington, DC. Visitors are urged to call ahead to 202–205–5681 to facilitate entrance into the building. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Iris Velez, Program Manager National Symbols, Office of Conservation Education Program, at 202–205–5681. Individuals who use telecommunication devices for the deaf (TDD) may call the Federal Relay Service (FRS) at 1–800– 877–8339 between 8 a.m. and 8 p.m., Eastern Standard Time, Monday through Friday. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Commercial Use of the Woodsy Owl Symbol. OMB Number: 0596–0087. Expiration Date of Approval: 04/30/2011. Type of Request: Extension of a currently approved collection. Abstract: The Woodsy Owl-Smokey Bear Act of 1974 established the Woodsy Owl symbol and slogan, authorizes the Secretary of Agriculture to manage the use of the slogan and symbol, authorizes the licensing of the symbol for commercial use, and provides for continued protection of the symbol. Part 272 of Title 36 of the Code of Federal Regulations authorizes the Chief of the Forest Service to approve PO 00000 Frm 00003 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 commercial use of the Woodsy Owl symbol and to collect royalty fees. Commercial use includes replicating Woodsy Owl symbol or logo on items, such as tee shirts, mugs, pins, figurines, ornaments, stickers, and toys and using the image and or slogan of the icon in motion pictures, documentaries, television magazine stories, and books, magazines, and other for-profit paper products. Woodsy Owl is America’s symbol for the conservation of the environment. The public service campaign slogans associated with Woodsy Owl are ‘‘Give a Hoot, Don’t Pollute’’ and ‘‘Lend a Hand, Care for the Land.’’ The mission statement of the Woodsy Owl’s conservation campaign is to help young children discover the natural world and join in life-long actions to care for that world. The USDA Forest Service National Symbols Program Manager will use the collected information to determine if the applicant will receive a license or renewal of an existing license and the associated royalty fees. Information collected includes, but is not limited to, tenure of business or non-profit organization, current or planned products, physical location, projected sales volume, and marketing plans. Licensees submit quarterly reports, which include: 1. A list of each item sold with the Woodsy Owl symbol. 2. Projected sales of each item. E:\FR\FM\18OCN1.SGM 18OCN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 75, Number 200 (Monday, October 18, 2010)]
[Notices]
[Pages 63798-63800]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2010-26083]


=======================================================================
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

Economic Research Service


Notice of Intent To Request New Information Collection

AGENCY: Economic Research Service, USDA.

ACTION: Notice and request for comments.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: In accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, this 
notice invites the general public and other public agencies to send 
comments regarding any aspect of this proposed information collection. 
This is a new collection to develop a Sampling Frame of Farm to School 
efforts.

DATES: Written comments on this notice must be received on or before 
December 17, 2010 to be assured of consideration.

ADDRESSES: Address all comments concerning this notice to Katherine 
Ralston, Food Economics Division, Economic Research Service, U.S. 
Department of Agriculture, 1800 M St., NW., Room N2163, Washington, DC 
20036-5801. Comments may also be submitted via fax to the attention of 
Katherine Ralston at 202-694-5663 or via e-mail to 
kralston@ers.usda.gov. Comments will also be accepted through the 
Federal eRulemaking Portal. Go to http://www.regulations.gov, and 
follow the online instructions for submitting comments electronically.
    All written comments will be open for public inspection at the 
office of the Economic Research Service during regular business hours 
(8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday) at 1800 M St., NW., Room 
N2163, Washington, DC 20036-5801.
    All responses to this notice will be summarized and included in the 
request for Office of Management and Budget approval. All comments will 
be a matter of public record. Comments are invited on: (a) Whether the 
proposed collection of information is necessary for the

[[Page 63799]]

proper performance of the functions of the agency, including whether 
the information shall have practical utility; (b) the accuracy of the 
agency's estimate of the burden of the proposed collection of 
information, including the validity of the methodology and assumptions 
used; (c) ways to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the 
information to be collected; and (d) ways to minimize the burden of the 
collection of information on those who are to respond, including use of 
appropriate automated, electronic, mechanical, or other technological 
collection techniques or other forms of information technology.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: For further information contact 
Katherine Ralston at the address in the preamble. Tel. 202-694-5463.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:
    Title: Census Survey of Farm to School Initiatives.
    OMB Number: 0536-XXXX.
    Expiration Date: Three years from the date of approval.
    Type of Request: New collection.

Abstract

    The Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008, also known as the 
2008 Farm Bill, amended the National School Lunch Act to allow 
institutions receiving funds through that act and the Child Nutrition 
Act of 1966 to apply a geographic preference to the procurement of 
unprocessed locally grown or locally raised agricultural products. This 
amendment provides local institutions more flexibility and increases 
opportunities for USDA to promote local foods in the school meal 
programs. While this part of the 2008 Farm Bill has yet to be funded, 
USDA has taken action to explore the issue through the Farm to School 
Initiative. USDA recognizes the growing interest among school districts 
and communities to incorporate regionally and locally produced farm 
foods into school nutrition programs supported by USDA. USDA school 
nutrition programs include the National School Lunch Program (NSLP), 
the School Breakfast Program (SBP), the Special Milk Program (SMP), 
which funds milk for students without access to other meal programs, 
and the Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program (FFVP), which funds the 
purchase of fresh fruits and vegetables provided as free snacks to 
students in selected schools with the States' highest percentages of 
students certified for free and reduced price meals.
    USDA is supporting Farm to School efforts through a number of 
initiatives, and continues to look for ways to help facilitate this 
important connection. In late 2009, USDA established ``Know Your 
Farmer, Know Your Food,'' an initiative which focuses on the importance 
of understanding where our food comes from and how it gets to our 
plates. In response to the growing demand for Farm to School 
activities, the ``USDA Farm to School Team'' was developed out of the 
``Know Your Farmer, Know Your Food'' Initiative.
    Successful Farm to School efforts have the potential to benefit 
multiple stakeholders, including the schools, the farmers, and the 
children. Through these efforts, schools are able to bring fresh, 
locally grown foods to school meal programs, while local farmers are 
able to attract new business by selling fruits and vegetables to 
schools in their area. In addition, activities surrounding Farm to 
School often help children learn essential lessons about how farm fresh 
produce is grown and its role in a nutritious, healthful diet. 
Introducing local farm products in both the classroom and the cafeteria 
allows children to experience the value and appeal of a diet rich in 
fresh fruits and vegetables. Many Farm to School activities include 
bringing students to farms and farmers into classrooms, as well as 
creating school gardens that both teach students about agriculture and 
support the meal program.
    While anecdotal evidence and case studies suggest that Farm to 
School activities improve students' nutrition and local economies, more 
representative objective research to measure these benefits and 
identify factors associated with success and cost-effectiveness are 
hampered by the lack of data. Surveys of school food authorities (SFAs) 
have included questions to indicate whether the SFA purchases locally, 
but the surveys have not included questions about the nature of the 
activities, and the samples of SFAs have not been large enough to yield 
a sufficient sample of SFAs implementing Farm to School activities for 
statistical analysis.
    The information to be collected by the Farm to School Census Survey 
is necessary to develop a stratified sampling frame for more detailed 
future surveys. Currently, the National Farm to School Network, through 
the Urban and Environmental Policy Institute at Occidental College, 
maintains the only national database of Farm to School initiatives. 
This database is created by information entered by programs directly on 
to the National Farm to School Network's Web site, and as a result is 
not a complete representation of Farm to School activity in the 
country. The Census Survey will contact 50 State agriculture 
departments, 50 State education departments, 50 State Farm to School 
coordinators, and 50 State cooperative extension offices to develop a 
list of school districts involved in Farm to School activities and 
their contact information. School districts identified on this list 
will be contacted to the following collect information on key 
characteristics:
    [diams] Contact information, including county, school district name 
and zip code.
    [diams] School nutrition programs available in the SFA or school 
(NSLP, SBP, SMP, and/or FFVP).
    [diams] When the efforts started.
    [diams] Types of activities:
     [cir] Local foods week or harvest of the month.
     [cir] Use of geographic preference in procurement.
     [cir] Direct local procurement for meals and/or snacks, including 
snacks supported by the Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program.
     [cir] Use of commodity dollars for locally sourced items through 
State Farm to School program.
     [cir] Requests for local sourcing through Department of Defense 
produce procurement (DoD Fresh).
     [cir] School gardens for snacks, meals or other use.
     [cir] Curriculum and classroom education out of classroom 
activities, farm tours.
     [cir] Agriscience programs.
    [diams] Number of schools participating.
    [diams] Number of children participating, if not all.
    [diams] Number of farmers/distributors supplying local product.
    [diams] Most common foods purchased locally.
    [diams] Requirement of Good Agriculture Practices (GAP) 
certification.
    [diams] Level of external grant funding received specific for Farm 
to School related efforts.
    Information on other potential stratification characteristics will 
be obtained by matching data from the Common Core Data to the database 
of SFAs implementing Farm to School activities and other geo-coded 
data.
    Data collection instruments will be kept as simple and respondent-
friendly as possible. Responses are voluntary and will be made publicly 
available only with permission of the respondent.
    Affected Public: Respondent groups include: (1) State agriculture 
department officials, (2) State education department officials, (3) 
State cooperative extension officials, (4) State Farm to School 
coordinators, and (5) local Farm to School coordinators.
    Estimated Number of Respondents: The estimated number of 
respondents

[[Page 63800]]

for the sampling frame includes: (1) 50 State agriculture department 
representatives, (2) 50 State department of education representatives, 
(3) 50 State cooperative extension representatives, (4) up to 50 State 
Farm to School coordinators, and (5) up to 1,000 local Farm to School 
coordinators. Ninety percent of each group is expected to respond. 
Estimates of the percentages of respondents who will agree to complete 
the interview are based on previous experience with developing the 
currently available database of farm to school initiatives.
    Estimated Number of Responses per Respondent: 20 for State-level 
respondents, 10 for local-level respondents. Estimated responses per 
respondent are as follows: Up to 200 State officials will be asked to 
identify local school districts which participate in Farm to School 
activities and provide contact information. An average of 20 school 
districts per respondent will be identified. An estimated 1,000 school 
districts will be contacted to obtain information on 10 key 
characteristics. (Note: identified school districts will overlap, so 
that redundant phone information serves as validation).
    Estimated Total Responses: 14,000.
    Estimated Time per Response: We estimate the time per response as 
0.05 hours (3 minutes) for State-level respondents to provide contact 
information for each school district within the state, and 0.25 hours 
(15 minutes) per question for local-level respondents to provide 
information on each key characteristic, on average. These estimates of 
respondent burden are based on experience with previous data collection 
efforts for Farm to School initiatives.
    Estimated Total Burden on Respondents: 2,700 hours. See the table 
below for the estimated total annual burden for each instrument.

                                                Reporting Burden
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                     Estimated
                                     Estimated                                       Estimated     total annual
           Description               number of     Responses per   Total annual   average number     hours of
                                    respondents     respondent       responses     of hours per      response
                                                                                     response         burden
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Request for programs in the                  200              20           4,000             .05             200
 state..........................
Key Characteristics.............           1,000              10          10,000             .25           2,500
                                 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total responding burden.....           1,200  ..............          14,000  ..............           2,700
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


    Dated: September 15, 2010.
Katherine R. Smith,
Administrator, Economic Research Service.
[FR Doc. 2010-26083 Filed 10-15-10; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 3410-18-P