Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter France Model SA-365N, SA-365N1, AS-365N2, AS-365N3, SA-366G1, EC 155B, EC155B1, SA-365C, SA-365C1, SA-365C2, SA-360C Helicopters, 61980-61982 [2010-24725]

Download as PDF 61980 Federal Register / Vol. 75, No. 194 / Thursday, October 7, 2010 / Rules and Regulations for this AD, follow the procedures in 14 CFR 39.19. Before using any approved AMOC on any airplane to which the AMOC applies, notify your principal maintenance inspector (PMI) or principal avionics inspector (PAI), as appropriate, or lacking a principal inspector, your local Flight Standards District Office. The AMOC approval letter must specifically reference this AD. (3) An AMOC that provides an acceptable level of safety may be used for any repair required by this AD, if it is approved by an Authorized Representative for the Boeing Commercial Airplanes Organization Designation Authorization who has been authorized by the Manager, Seattle ACO, to make those findings. For a repair method to be approved, the repair must meet the certification basis of the airplane, and the approval must specifically refer to this AD. (4) AMOCs approved previously in accordance with AD 90–15–06, Amendment 39–6653; and AD 94–12–09, Amendment 39–8937; are approved as AMOCs for the corresponding provisions of this AD. Material Incorporated by Reference srobinson on DSKHWCL6B1PROD with RULES (r) You must use Boeing Service Bulletin 747–53–2307, Revision 3, dated April 16, 2009, to do the actions required by this AD, unless the AD specifies otherwise. If you accomplish the optional actions specified by this AD, you must use Boeing Service Bulletin 747–53–2307, Revision 3, dated April 16, 2009, to perform those actions, unless the AD specifies otherwise. (1) The Director of the Federal Register approved the incorporation by reference of this service information under 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. (2) For service information identified in this AD, contact Boeing Commercial Airplanes, Attention: Data & Services Management, P.O. Box 3707, MC 2H–65, Seattle, Washington 98124–2207; telephone 206–544–5000, extension 1; fax 206–766– 5680; e-mail me.boecom@boeing.com; Internet https://www.myboeingfleet.com. (3) You may review copies of the service information at the FAA, Transport Airplane Directorate, 1601 Lind Avenue, SW., Renton, Washington. For information on the availability of this material at the FAA, call 425–227–1221. (4) You may also review copies of the service information that is incorporated by reference at the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). For information on the availability of this material at NARA, call 202–741–6030, or go to: http://www.archives.gov/federal_register/ code_of_federal_regulations/ ibr_locations.html. Issued in Renton, Washington, on September 23, 2010. Ali Bahrami, Manager, Transport Airplane Directorate, Aircraft Certification Service. [FR Doc. 2010–25019 Filed 10–6–10; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–13–P VerDate Mar<15>2010 17:58 Oct 06, 2010 Jkt 223001 Federal Aviation Administration Ground Floor, Room W12–140, 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE., Washington, DC. 14 CFR Part 39 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION [Docket No. FAA–2010–0610; Directorate Identifier 2009–SW–47–AD; Amendment 39– 16455; AD 2010–20–20] RIN 2120–AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter France Model SA–365N, SA–365N1, AS–365N2, AS–365N3, SA–366G1, EC 155B, EC155B1, SA–365C, SA–365C1, SA–365C2, SA–360C Helicopters Federal Aviation Administration, DOT. ACTION: Final rule. AGENCY: This amendment supersedes an existing airworthiness directive (AD) for the specified Eurocopter France (Eurocopter) helicopters. That AD requires repetitively inspecting the main gearbox (MGB) planet gear carrier for a crack and replacing any MGB that has a cracked planet gear carrier before further flight. This action requires the same inspections required by the existing AD, but shortens the initial inspection interval. This AD is prompted by the discovery of another crack in a MGB planet gear carrier and additional analysis that indicates that the initial inspection interval must be shortened. The actions specified by this AD are intended to detect a crack in the web of the planet gear carrier, which could lead to a MGB seizure and subsequent loss of control of the helicopter. SUMMARY: Effective November 12, 2010. The incorporation by reference of certain publications listed in the regulations is approved by the Director of the Federal Register as of November 12, 2010. ADDRESSES: You may examine the docket that contains this AD, any comments, and other information on the Internet at http://www.regulations.gov, or at the Docket Operations office, West Building Ground Floor, Room W12–140, 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE., Washington, DC. You may get the service information identified in this AD from American Eurocopter Corporation, 2701 Forum Drive, Grand Prairie, Texas 75053–4005, telephone (972) 641–3460, fax (972) 641–3527. Examining the Docket: You may examine the docket that contains this AD, any comments, and other information on the Internet at http:// www.regulations.gov, or at the Docket Operations office, West Building DATES: PO 00000 Frm 00006 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 Gary Roach, Aerospace Engineer, FAA, Regulations and Policy Group, 2601 Meacham Blvd., ASW–111, Fort Worth, Texas 76137; telephone: (817) 222– 5130; fax: 817–222–5961. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: A proposal to amend 14 CFR part 39 by superseding AD 2005–03–09, Amendment 39–13965 (70 FR 7382, February 14, 2005), for the specified Eurocopter France (Eurocopter) model helicopters was published in the Federal Register on June 28, 2010 (75 FR 36581). The action proposed to require shortening the initial inspection required by AD 2005–03–09 from 265 hours time-in-service (TIS) to 35 hours TIS and retaining the 50-hour TIS recurring inspections. That proposal was prompted by the finding of an additional crack in the MGB planet gear carrier of a Eurocopter Model EC 155 helicopter. That crack was caused by a progressive fatigue failure caused by scoring in the blend radius between the pin and the web. An additional analysis indicates that the initial inspection must be shortened. Therefore, this AD shortens the initial inspection from 265 hours time-in-service (TIS) to 35 hours TIS. The recurring 50 hour-TIS inspections would remain the same. The European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA), which is the Technical Agent for France, has issued EASA Emergency Airworthiness Directive No. 2007– 0288–E, dated November 15, 2007. EASA states that cracks were discovered in the web of the MGB planet gear carrier. ‘‘The two affected MGB units had been removed for overhaul/repair, subsequent to the detection of metal chips at the magnetic plugs.’’ Investigation of the first case showed a failure of the head of a screw that secures the sun gear bearing. The screw head was caught by the planet gear/ fixed ring gear/sun gear drive train. The second case was discovered by the manufacturer and did not seem to be associated with any other failure. You may obtain further information by examining the MCAI and any related service information in the AD docket. Related Service Information Eurocopter France has issued the following Emergency Alert Service Bulletins: • No. 05A007, Revision 2, for the Model EC155 helicopters; • No. 05.00.48, Revision 3, for the Model AS365 helicopters; E:\FR\FM\07OCR1.SGM 07OCR1 Federal Register / Vol. 75, No. 194 / Thursday, October 7, 2010 / Rules and Regulations • No. 05.26, Revision 2, for the Model SA360 and SA365 helicopters; and • No. 05.33, Revision 2, for the SA366 helicopters. Each Emergency Alert Service Bulletin (EASB) at the stated revision level is dated November 16, 2009 and describes the discovery of a progressive fatigue failure of the planet gear carrier. The EASBs specify inspecting the MGB planet gear carrier for a crack and removing the MGB and contacting the manufacturer before the next flight if a crack is found. FAA’s Evaluation and Unsafe Condition Determination These products have been approved by the aviation authority of France and are approved for operation in the United States. Pursuant to our bilateral agreement with France, EASA, their technical representative, has notified us of the unsafe condition described in the MCAI AD. We are proposing this AD because we evaluated all information provided by EASA and determined the unsafe condition exists and is likely to exist or develop on other products of these same type designs. This AD requires inspecting the MGB planet gear carrier for a crack and replacing the MGB before further flight if a crack is found. The actions must be accomplished by following the specified portions of the EASBs described previously. Differences Between This Proposed AD and the MCAI AD The MCAI AD references the service information rather than stating compliance times as we have done in this AD. Unlike the MCAI AD, we have structured our compliance times based on a 250-hour TIS threshold. Also, this AD does not require you to report cracks in the planet gear carrier to the manufacturer. Comments Interested persons have been afforded an opportunity to participate in the making of this amendment. No comments were received on the proposal or the FAA’s determination of the cost to the public. The FAA has determined that air safety and the public interest require the adoption of the rule as proposed. Costs of Compliance We estimate that this AD will affect 145 helicopters of U.S. registry. We also estimate that it will take about 1 workhour per helicopter for each borescope inspection and 12 work-hours for each visual inspection. Replacing the MGB, if necessary, will take about 16 workhours. The average labor rate is $85 per work-hour. Required parts will cost about $66,780 per MGB. Based on these figures, we estimate the cost of this AD on U.S. operators is $3,486,760, assuming that a borescope inspection is done on the entire fleet 12 times a year, that no visual inspections are done, and that 49 MGBs are replaced. Regulatory Findings We have determined that this AD will not have federalism implications under Executive Order 13132. This AD will not have a substantial direct effect on the States, on the relationship between the national Government and the States, or on the distribution of power and responsibilities among the various levels of government. For the reasons discussed above, I certify that the regulation: 1. Is not a ‘‘significant regulatory action’’ under Executive Order 12866; 2. Is not a ‘‘significant rule’’ under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); and 3. Will not have a significant economic impact, positive or negative, on a substantial number of small entities under the criteria of the Regulatory Flexibility Act. We prepared an economic evaluation of the estimated costs to comply with this AD. See the AD docket to examine the economic evaluation. Authority for This Rulemaking Title 49 of the United States Code specifies the FAA’s authority to issue rules on aviation safety. Subtitle I, section 106, describes the authority of the FAA Administrator. Subtitle VII, Aviation Programs, describes in more 61981 detail the scope of the Agency’s authority. We are issuing this rulemaking under the authority described in subtitle VII, part A, subpart III, section 44701, ‘‘General requirements.’’ Under that section, Congress charges the FAA with promoting safe flight of civil aircraft in air commerce by prescribing regulations for practices, methods, and procedures the Administrator finds necessary for safety in air commerce. This regulation is within the scope of that authority because it addresses an unsafe condition that is likely to exist or develop on products identified in this rulemaking action. List of Subjects in 14 CFR Part 39 Air transportation, Aircraft, Aviation safety, Incorporation by reference, Safety. Adoption of the Amendment Accordingly, under the authority delegated to me by the Administrator, the FAA amends 14 CFR part 39 as follows: ■ PART 39—AIRWORTHINESS DIRECTIVES 1. The authority citation for part 39 continues to read as follows: ■ Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40113, 44701. § 39.13 [Amended] 2. Section 39.13 is amended by removing Amendment 39–13965 (70 FR 7382, February 14, 2005), and by adding a new airworthiness directive (AD), Amendment 39–16455, to read as follows: ■ 2010–20–20 Eurocopter France: Amendment 39–16455; Docket No. FAA–2010–0610; Directorate Identifier 2009–SW–47–AD. Supersedes AD 2005– 03–09; Amendment 39–13965; Docket No. FAA–2005–20294; Directorate Identifier 2004–SW–39–AD. Applicability: Model EC 155B, EC155B1, SA–360C, SA–365C, SA–365C1, SA–365C2, SA–365N, SA–365N1, AS–365N2, AS 365 N3, and SA–366G1 helicopters, certificated in any category. Compliance: Required as indicated. srobinson on DSKHWCL6B1PROD with RULES For a main gearbox (MGB) that has: Inspect: (1) Less than 250 hours time-in-service (TIS) since new or last overhaul. (2) 250 or more hours TIS since new or last overhaul. On or before the MGB reaches 35 hours TIS, unless accomplished previously, and thereafter at intervals not to exceed 50 hours TIS. Within 15 hours TIS, unless accomplished previously, and thereafter at intervals not to exceed 50 hours TIS. To detect a crack in the web of the planet gear carrier, which could lead to a MGB seizure and subsequent loss of control of the helicopter, accomplish the following: VerDate Mar<15>2010 17:58 Oct 06, 2010 Jkt 223001 (a) Either borescope inspect the web of the MGB planet gear carrier for a crack in accordance with the Operational Procedure, paragraphs 2.B.2. through 2.B.2.a.1, of PO 00000 Frm 00007 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 Eurocopter Emergency Alert Service Bulletin (EASB) No. 05A007, Revision 2; No. 05.00.48, Revision 3; No. 05.26, Revision 2; or No. 05.33, Revision 2; as applicable to E:\FR\FM\07OCR1.SGM 07OCR1 61982 Federal Register / Vol. 75, No. 194 / Thursday, October 7, 2010 / Rules and Regulations your model helicopter, or visually inspect the MGB planet gear carrier in accordance with the Operational Procedure, paragraphs 2.B.3. through paragraph 2.B.3.a.1, of the EASB applicable to your model helicopter. Each EASB at the stated revision level is dated November 16, 2009. (b) If a crack is found in the planet gear carrier, replace the MGB with an airworthy MGB before further flight. (c) To request a different method of compliance or a different compliance time for this AD, follow the procedures in 14 CFR 39.19. Contact the Manager, Safety Management Group, FAA, Attn: Gary Roach, Aviation Safety Engineer, Rotorcraft Directorate, FAA, 2601 Meacham Blvd., Fort Worth, Texas 76137, telephone (817) 222– 5130, fax (817) 222–5961, for information about previously approved alternative methods of compliance. (d) The Joint Aircraft System/Component (JASC) Code is 6320: Main Rotor Gearbox. (e) The inspections shall be done in accordance with the specified portions of Eurocopter Emergency Alert Service Bulletin No. 05A007, Revision 2, No. 05.00.48, Revision 3, No. 05.26, Revision 2, or No. 05.33, Revision 2. Each service bulletin at the stated revision level is dated November 16, 2009. The Director of the Federal Register approved this incorporation by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained from American Eurocopter Corporation, 2701 Forum Drive, Grand Prairie, Texas 75053– 4005, telephone (972) 641–3460, fax (972) 641–3527. Copies may be inspected at the FAA, Office of the Regional Counsel, Southwest Region, 2601 Meacham Blvd., Room 663, Fort Worth, Texas, or at the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). For information on the availability of this material at NARA, call 202–741–6030, or go to: http:// www.archives.gov/federal_register/ code_of_federal_regulations/ ibr_locations.html. (f) This amendment becomes effective on November 12, 2010. Note: The subject of this AD is addressed in European Aviation Safety Agency AD No. 2007–0288–E, dated November 15, 2007. Issued in Fort Worth, Texas, on September 22, 2010. Mark R. Schilling, Acting Manager, Rotorcraft Directorate, Aircraft Certification Service. [FR Doc. 2010–24725 Filed 10–6–10; 8:45 am] srobinson on DSKHWCL6B1PROD with RULES BILLING CODE 4910–13–P VerDate Mar<15>2010 17:58 Oct 06, 2010 Jkt 223001 DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 [Docket No. FAA–2010–0474; Directorate Identifier 2009–NM–056–AD; Amendment 39–16465; AD 2010–21–05] RIN 2120–AA64 Airworthiness Directives; BAE Systems (Operations) Limited Model 4101 Airplanes Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Final rule. AGENCY: We are superseding an existing airworthiness directive (AD) for the products listed above. This AD results from mandatory continuing airworthiness information (MCAI) originated by an aviation authority of another country to identify and correct an unsafe condition on an aviation product. The MCAI describes the unsafe condition as: SUMMARY: During ground manoeuvring, prolonged operation with either engine in the restricted range between 82% and 90% RPM [revolutions per minute] will result in damage [e.g., cracking of the blade or hub] to the propeller assembly that could eventually result in the release of a propeller blade. * * * EASA [European Aviation Safety Agency] AD 2007–0268 [which corresponds to FAA AD 2008–13–02, amendment 39– 15565] was issued to require the installation of a Propeller Warning Placard and implementation of a corresponding Aircraft Flight Manual (AFM) limitation instructing the flight crew to taxi with the condition lever at FLIGHT in order to minimise the time spent by the engines in the restricted range. BAE Systems has now developed a Propeller Speed Warning System * * *. * * * * * A released propeller blade could result in engine failure and loss of control of the airplane. We are issuing this AD to require actions to correct the unsafe condition on these products. DATES: This AD becomes effective November 12, 2010. The Director of the Federal Register approved the incorporation by reference of a certain publication listed in this AD as of November 12, 2010. The Director of the Federal Register approved the incorporation by reference of certain other publications listed in this AD as of July 24, 2008 (73 FR 34847, June 19, 2008). ADDRESSES: You may examine the AD docket on the Internet at http:// www.regulations.gov or in person at the U.S. Department of Transportation, PO 00000 Frm 00008 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 Docket Operations, M–30, West Building Ground Floor, Room W12–140, 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE., Washington, DC. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Todd Thompson, Aerospace Engineer, International Branch, ANM–116, Transport Airplane Directorate, FAA, 1601 Lind Avenue, SW., Renton, Washington 98057–3356; telephone (425) 227–1175; fax (425) 227–1149. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Discussion We issued a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) to amend 14 CFR part 39 to include an AD that would apply to the specified products. That NPRM was published in the Federal Register on May 10, 2010 (75 FR 25785), and proposed to supersede AD 2008– 13–02, amendment 39–15565 (73 FR 34847), June 19, 2008. That NPRM proposed to correct an unsafe condition for the specified products. Since we issued AD 2008–13–02, inadvertent high RPMs taxiing operations have been reported to have caused stress to the propeller blades, which can result in dangerous blade cracks. The European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA), which is the Technical Agent for the Member States of the European Community, has issued EASA Airworthiness Directive 2009–0038, dated February 18, 2009 (referred to after this as ‘‘the MCAI’’), to correct an unsafe condition for the specified products. The MCAI states: During ground manoeuvring, prolonged operation with either engine in the restricted range between 82% and 90% RPM [revolutions per minute] will result in damage [e.g., cracking of the blade or hub] to the propeller assembly that could eventually result in the release of a propeller blade. To correct this unsafe condition, EASA AD 2007–0268 [which corresponds to FAA AD 2008–13–02, amendment 39–15565] was issued to require the installation of a Propeller Warning Placard and implementation of a corresponding Aircraft Flight Manual (AFM) limitation, instructing the flight crew to taxi with the condition lever at FLIGHT in order to minimise the time spent by the engines in the restricted range. BAE Systems has now developed a Propeller Speed Warning System, the embodiment of which will allow taxiing with the condition lever at TAXI, through the introduction of a revised Flight Manual Limitation. For the reasons described above, this EASA AD retains the requirements of EASA AD 2007–0268, which is superseded, and requires the installation of a Propeller Speed Warning System. A released propeller blade could result in engine failure and loss of control of the airplane. You may obtain E:\FR\FM\07OCR1.SGM 07OCR1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 75, Number 194 (Thursday, October 7, 2010)]
[Rules and Regulations]
[Pages 61980-61982]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2010-24725]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

Federal Aviation Administration

14 CFR Part 39

[Docket No. FAA-2010-0610; Directorate Identifier 2009-SW-47-AD; 
Amendment 39-16455; AD 2010-20-20]
RIN 2120-AA64


Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter France Model SA-365N, SA-
365N1, AS-365N2, AS-365N3, SA-366G1, EC 155B, EC155B1, SA-365C, SA-
365C1, SA-365C2, SA-360C Helicopters

AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration, DOT.

ACTION: Final rule.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: This amendment supersedes an existing airworthiness directive 
(AD) for the specified Eurocopter France (Eurocopter) helicopters. That 
AD requires repetitively inspecting the main gearbox (MGB) planet gear 
carrier for a crack and replacing any MGB that has a cracked planet 
gear carrier before further flight. This action requires the same 
inspections required by the existing AD, but shortens the initial 
inspection interval. This AD is prompted by the discovery of another 
crack in a MGB planet gear carrier and additional analysis that 
indicates that the initial inspection interval must be shortened. The 
actions specified by this AD are intended to detect a crack in the web 
of the planet gear carrier, which could lead to a MGB seizure and 
subsequent loss of control of the helicopter.

DATES: Effective November 12, 2010.
    The incorporation by reference of certain publications listed in 
the regulations is approved by the Director of the Federal Register as 
of November 12, 2010.

ADDRESSES: You may examine the docket that contains this AD, any 
comments, and other information on the Internet at http://www.regulations.gov, or at the Docket Operations office, West Building 
Ground Floor, Room W12-140, 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE., Washington, 
DC.
    You may get the service information identified in this AD from 
American Eurocopter Corporation, 2701 Forum Drive, Grand Prairie, Texas 
75053-4005, telephone (972) 641-3460, fax (972) 641-3527.
    Examining the Docket: You may examine the docket that contains this 
AD, any comments, and other information on the Internet at http://www.regulations.gov, or at the Docket Operations office, West Building 
Ground Floor, Room W12-140, 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE., Washington, 
DC.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Gary Roach, Aerospace Engineer, FAA, 
Regulations and Policy Group, 2601 Meacham Blvd., ASW-111, Fort Worth, 
Texas 76137; telephone: (817) 222-5130; fax: 817-222-5961.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: A proposal to amend 14 CFR part 39 by 
superseding AD 2005-03-09, Amendment 39-13965 (70 FR 7382, February 14, 
2005), for the specified Eurocopter France (Eurocopter) model 
helicopters was published in the Federal Register on June 28, 2010 (75 
FR 36581). The action proposed to require shortening the initial 
inspection required by AD 2005-03-09 from 265 hours time-in-service 
(TIS) to 35 hours TIS and retaining the 50-hour TIS recurring 
inspections. That proposal was prompted by the finding of an additional 
crack in the MGB planet gear carrier of a Eurocopter Model EC 155 
helicopter. That crack was caused by a progressive fatigue failure 
caused by scoring in the blend radius between the pin and the web. An 
additional analysis indicates that the initial inspection must be 
shortened. Therefore, this AD shortens the initial inspection from 265 
hours time-in-service (TIS) to 35 hours TIS. The recurring 50 hour-TIS 
inspections would remain the same.
    The European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA), which is the Technical 
Agent for France, has issued EASA Emergency Airworthiness Directive No. 
2007-0288-E, dated November 15, 2007. EASA states that cracks were 
discovered in the web of the MGB planet gear carrier. ``The two 
affected MGB units had been removed for overhaul/repair, subsequent to 
the detection of metal chips at the magnetic plugs.'' Investigation of 
the first case showed a failure of the head of a screw that secures the 
sun gear bearing. The screw head was caught by the planet gear/fixed 
ring gear/sun gear drive train. The second case was discovered by the 
manufacturer and did not seem to be associated with any other failure. 
You may obtain further information by examining the MCAI and any 
related service information in the AD docket.

Related Service Information

    Eurocopter France has issued the following Emergency Alert Service 
Bulletins:
     No. 05A007, Revision 2, for the Model EC155 helicopters;
     No. 05.00.48, Revision 3, for the Model AS365 helicopters;

[[Page 61981]]

     No. 05.26, Revision 2, for the Model SA360 and SA365 
helicopters; and
     No. 05.33, Revision 2, for the SA366 helicopters.

Each Emergency Alert Service Bulletin (EASB) at the stated revision 
level is dated November 16, 2009 and describes the discovery of a 
progressive fatigue failure of the planet gear carrier. The EASBs 
specify inspecting the MGB planet gear carrier for a crack and removing 
the MGB and contacting the manufacturer before the next flight if a 
crack is found.

FAA's Evaluation and Unsafe Condition Determination

    These products have been approved by the aviation authority of 
France and are approved for operation in the United States. Pursuant to 
our bilateral agreement with France, EASA, their technical 
representative, has notified us of the unsafe condition described in 
the MCAI AD. We are proposing this AD because we evaluated all 
information provided by EASA and determined the unsafe condition exists 
and is likely to exist or develop on other products of these same type 
designs. This AD requires inspecting the MGB planet gear carrier for a 
crack and replacing the MGB before further flight if a crack is found. 
The actions must be accomplished by following the specified portions of 
the EASBs described previously.

Differences Between This Proposed AD and the MCAI AD

    The MCAI AD references the service information rather than stating 
compliance times as we have done in this AD. Unlike the MCAI AD, we 
have structured our compliance times based on a 250-hour TIS threshold. 
Also, this AD does not require you to report cracks in the planet gear 
carrier to the manufacturer.

Comments

    Interested persons have been afforded an opportunity to participate 
in the making of this amendment. No comments were received on the 
proposal or the FAA's determination of the cost to the public. The FAA 
has determined that air safety and the public interest require the 
adoption of the rule as proposed.

Costs of Compliance

    We estimate that this AD will affect 145 helicopters of U.S. 
registry. We also estimate that it will take about 1 work-hour per 
helicopter for each borescope inspection and 12 work-hours for each 
visual inspection. Replacing the MGB, if necessary, will take about 16 
work-hours. The average labor rate is $85 per work-hour. Required parts 
will cost about $66,780 per MGB. Based on these figures, we estimate 
the cost of this AD on U.S. operators is $3,486,760, assuming that a 
borescope inspection is done on the entire fleet 12 times a year, that 
no visual inspections are done, and that 49 MGBs are replaced.

Regulatory Findings

    We have determined that this AD will not have federalism 
implications under Executive Order 13132. This AD will not have a 
substantial direct effect on the States, on the relationship between 
the national Government and the States, or on the distribution of power 
and responsibilities among the various levels of government.
    For the reasons discussed above, I certify that the regulation:
    1. Is not a ``significant regulatory action'' under Executive Order 
12866;
    2. Is not a ``significant rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies 
and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); and
    3. Will not have a significant economic impact, positive or 
negative, on a substantial number of small entities under the criteria 
of the Regulatory Flexibility Act.
    We prepared an economic evaluation of the estimated costs to comply 
with this AD. See the AD docket to examine the economic evaluation.

Authority for This Rulemaking

    Title 49 of the United States Code specifies the FAA's authority to 
issue rules on aviation safety. Subtitle I, section 106, describes the 
authority of the FAA Administrator. Subtitle VII, Aviation Programs, 
describes in more detail the scope of the Agency's authority.
    We are issuing this rulemaking under the authority described in 
subtitle VII, part A, subpart III, section 44701, ``General 
requirements.'' Under that section, Congress charges the FAA with 
promoting safe flight of civil aircraft in air commerce by prescribing 
regulations for practices, methods, and procedures the Administrator 
finds necessary for safety in air commerce. This regulation is within 
the scope of that authority because it addresses an unsafe condition 
that is likely to exist or develop on products identified in this 
rulemaking action.

List of Subjects in 14 CFR Part 39

    Air transportation, Aircraft, Aviation safety, Incorporation by 
reference, Safety.

Adoption of the Amendment

0
Accordingly, under the authority delegated to me by the Administrator, 
the FAA amends 14 CFR part 39 as follows:

PART 39--AIRWORTHINESS DIRECTIVES

0
1. The authority citation for part 39 continues to read as follows:

    Authority:  49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40113, 44701.

Sec.  39.13  [Amended]

0
2. Section 39.13 is amended by removing Amendment 39-13965 (70 FR 7382, 
February 14, 2005), and by adding a new airworthiness directive (AD), 
Amendment 39-16455, to read as follows:

2010-20-20 Eurocopter France: Amendment 39-16455; Docket No. FAA-
2010-0610; Directorate Identifier 2009-SW-47-AD. Supersedes AD 2005-
03-09; Amendment 39-13965; Docket No. FAA-2005-20294; Directorate 
Identifier 2004-SW-39-AD.

    Applicability: Model EC 155B, EC155B1, SA-360C, SA-365C, SA-
365C1, SA-365C2, SA-365N, SA-365N1, AS-365N2, AS 365 N3, and SA-
366G1 helicopters, certificated in any category.
    Compliance: Required as indicated.

------------------------------------------------------------------------
   For a main gearbox (MGB) that has:                Inspect:
------------------------------------------------------------------------
(1) Less than 250 hours time-in-service  On or before the MGB reaches 35
 (TIS) since new or last overhaul.        hours TIS, unless accomplished
                                          previously, and thereafter at
                                          intervals not to exceed 50
                                          hours TIS.
(2) 250 or more hours TIS since new or   Within 15 hours TIS, unless
 last overhaul.                           accomplished previously, and
                                          thereafter at intervals not to
                                          exceed 50 hours TIS.
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    To detect a crack in the web of the planet gear carrier, which 
could lead to a MGB seizure and subsequent loss of control of the 
helicopter, accomplish the following:
    (a) Either borescope inspect the web of the MGB planet gear 
carrier for a crack in accordance with the Operational Procedure, 
paragraphs 2.B.2. through 2.B.2.a.1, of Eurocopter Emergency Alert 
Service Bulletin (EASB) No. 05A007, Revision 2; No. 05.00.48, 
Revision 3; No. 05.26, Revision 2; or No. 05.33, Revision 2; as 
applicable to

[[Page 61982]]

your model helicopter, or visually inspect the MGB planet gear 
carrier in accordance with the Operational Procedure, paragraphs 
2.B.3. through paragraph 2.B.3.a.1, of the EASB applicable to your 
model helicopter. Each EASB at the stated revision level is dated 
November 16, 2009.
    (b) If a crack is found in the planet gear carrier, replace the 
MGB with an airworthy MGB before further flight.
    (c) To request a different method of compliance or a different 
compliance time for this AD, follow the procedures in 14 CFR 39.19. 
Contact the Manager, Safety Management Group, FAA, Attn: Gary Roach, 
Aviation Safety Engineer, Rotorcraft Directorate, FAA, 2601 Meacham 
Blvd., Fort Worth, Texas 76137, telephone (817) 222-5130, fax (817) 
222-5961, for information about previously approved alternative 
methods of compliance.
    (d) The Joint Aircraft System/Component (JASC) Code is 6320: 
Main Rotor Gearbox.
    (e) The inspections shall be done in accordance with the 
specified portions of Eurocopter Emergency Alert Service Bulletin 
No. 05A007, Revision 2, No. 05.00.48, Revision 3, No. 05.26, 
Revision 2, or No. 05.33, Revision 2. Each service bulletin at the 
stated revision level is dated November 16, 2009. The Director of 
the Federal Register approved this incorporation by reference in 
accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be 
obtained from American Eurocopter Corporation, 2701 Forum Drive, 
Grand Prairie, Texas 75053-4005, telephone (972) 641-3460, fax (972) 
641-3527. Copies may be inspected at the FAA, Office of the Regional 
Counsel, Southwest Region, 2601 Meacham Blvd., Room 663, Fort Worth, 
Texas, or at the National Archives and Records Administration 
(NARA). For information on the availability of this material at 
NARA, call 202-741-6030, or go to: http://www.archives.gov/federal_register/code_of_federal_regulations/ibr_locations.html.
    (f) This amendment becomes effective on November 12, 2010.

    Note:  The subject of this AD is addressed in European Aviation 
Safety Agency AD No. 2007-0288-E, dated November 15, 2007.


    Issued in Fort Worth, Texas, on September 22, 2010.
Mark R. Schilling,
Acting Manager, Rotorcraft Directorate, Aircraft Certification Service.
[FR Doc. 2010-24725 Filed 10-6-10; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4910-13-P