Airports/Locations: Special Operating Restrictions, 61612-61613 [2010-25102]

Download as PDF 61612 Federal Register / Vol. 75, No. 193 / Wednesday, October 6, 2010 / Rules and Regulations WReier-Aviles on DSKGBLS3C1PROD with RULES controlled airspace at San Clemente, CA (75 FR 42014). Interested parties were invited to participate in this rulemaking effort by submitting written comments on the proposal to the FAA. No comments were received. Subsequent to publication, the FAA found the geographic coordinates of the airport needed to be adjusted. This action makes the adjustment. With the exception of editorial changes, and the changes described above, this rule is the same as that proposed in the NPRM. Class E airspace designations are published in paragraph 6004, of FAA Order 7400.9U dated August 18, 2010, and effective September 15, 2010, which is incorporated by reference in 14 CFR Part 71.1. The Class E airspace designations listed in this document will be published subsequently in that Order. The Rule This action amends Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) Part 71 by amending Class E airspace designated as an extension to a Class D surface area, at San Clemente Island NALF (Fredrick Sherman Field), San Clemente, CA. The San Clemente Island NDB has been decommissioned, and the NDB approach canceled. This action will also update the geographic coordinates of the airport to coincide with the FAA’s National Aeronautical Navigation Services. This action is necessary for the safety and management of IFR operations. The FAA has determined this regulation only involves an established body of technical regulations for which frequent and routine amendments are necessary to keep them operationally current. Therefore, this regulation: (1) Is not a ‘‘significant regulatory action’’ under Executive Order 12866; (2) is not a ‘‘significant rule’’ under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of a regulatory evaluation as the anticipated impact is so minimal. Since this is a routine matter that will only affect air traffic procedures and air navigation, it is certified this rule, when promulgated, will not have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small entities under the criteria of the Regulatory Flexibility Act. The FAA’s authority to issue rules regarding aviation safety is found in Title 49 of the U.S. Code. Subtitle 1, Section 106 discusses the authority of the FAA Administrator. Subtitle VII, Aviation Programs, describes in more detail the scope of the agency’s authority. This rulemaking is promulgated under the authority described in Subtitle VII, Part VerDate Mar<15>2010 15:06 Oct 05, 2010 Jkt 223001 A, Subpart I, Section 40103. Under that section, the FAA is charged with prescribing regulations to assign the use of airspace necessary to ensure the safety of aircraft and the efficient use of airspace. This regulation is within the scope of that authority as it amends controlled airspace at San Clemente Island NALF (Fredrick Sherman Field), San Clemente, CA. Issued in Seattle, Washington, on September 23, 2010. Lori Andriesen, Acting Manager, Operations Support Group, Western Service Center. List of Subjects in 14 CFR Part 71 Federal Aviation Administration Airspace, Incorporation by reference, Navigation (air). 14 CFR Part 91 Adoption of the Amendment In consideration of the foregoing, the Federal Aviation Administration amends 14 CFR Part 71 as follows: ■ PART 71—DESIGNATION OF CLASS A, B, C, D AND E AIRSPACE AREAS; AIR TRAFFIC SERVICE ROUTES; AND REPORTING POINTS 1. The authority citation for 14 CFR Part 71 continues to read as follows: ■ Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959– 1963 Comp., p. 389. § 71.1 [Amended] 2. The incorporation by reference in 14 CFR Part 71.1 of the Federal Aviation Administration Order 7400.9U, Airspace Designations and Reporting Points, dated August 18, 2010, and effective September 15, 2010 is amended as follows: ■ Paragraph 6004 Class E airspace Designated as an Extension to a Class D Surface Area. * * * AWP CA E4 * * San Clemente, CA [Modified] San Clemente Island NALF (Fredrick Sherman Field), CA (Lat. 33°01′22″ N., long. 118°35′19″ W.) San Clemente Island TACAN (Lat. 33°01′37″ N., long. 118°34′46″ W.) That airspace extending upward from the surface within 2.6 miles each side of the San Clemente Island TACAN 334° radial extending from the 4.3-mile radius of San Clemente Island NALF (Fredrick Sherman Field) to Control 1177L, and within 1.8 miles each side of the 064° bearing from San Clemente Island NALF (Fredrick Sherman Field) extending from the 4.3-mile radius to 9 miles northeast. This Class E airspace area is effective during the specific dates and times established in advance by a Notice to Airmen. The effective date and time will thereafter be continuously published in the Airport/Facility Directory. PO 00000 Frm 00024 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 [FR Doc. 2010–24799 Filed 10–5–10; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–13–P DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION [Docket No. FAA–2010–0995; Amendment No. 91–319] Airports/Locations: Special Operating Restrictions Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule; technical amendment. AGENCY: The FAA is amending its airports and locations special operating restrictions regulation to clarify a minor discrepancy in terminology. This amendment standardizes the language used to describe the altitude at which aircraft operating within 30 nautical miles of the listed airports are required to be equipped with an altitude encoding transponder. This action is not making any substantive changes to the regulation. DATES: Effective: October 6, 2010. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ellen Crum, Air Traffic Systems Operations, Airspace and Rules Group, 800 Independence Ave. SW., Washington, DC 20591; telephone (202) 267–8783; e-mail ellen.crum@faa.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: SUMMARY: Background On November 30, 1999 (64 FR 66768), the FAA published a final rule that revised 14 CFR part 91. In the final rule, § 91.215(b)(2) states ‘‘* * *from the surface upward to 10,000 MSL* * *’’ The corresponding text in section 1 of Appendix D should be consistent in describing the altitude as ‘‘MSL’’ but inadvertently was changed from MSL to ‘‘above the surface.’’ Therefore, this action will correct this inconsistency and change the phrase from ‘‘above the surface’’ to ‘‘MSL’’ in section 1 of Appendix D. As this rule simply corrects an inconsistency in the terminology used to describe altitudes, good cause exists for adopting this amendment without public notice or comment as provided under 5 U.S.C. 553(b). Furthermore, the FAA finds that good cause exists pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 553(d) for making E:\FR\FM\06OCR1.SGM 06OCR1 Federal Register / Vol. 75, No. 193 / Wednesday, October 6, 2010 / Rules and Regulations this rule effective within less than 30 days. List of Subjects in 14 CFR Part 91 Air traffic control, Aircraft, Airmen, Airports, Aviation safety. The Amendment In consideration of the foregoing, the Federal Aviation Administration amends Chapter I of Title 14, Code of Federal Regulations, as follows: ■ PART 91—GENERAL OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES 1. The authority citation for part 91 continues to read as follows: ■ Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g), 1155, 40103, 40113, 40120, 44101, 44111, 44701, 44704, 44709, 44711, 44712, 44715, 44716, 44717, 44722, 46306, 46315, 46316, 46504, 46506– 46507, 47122, 47508, 47528–47531, articles 12 and 29 of the Convention on International Civil Aviation (61 Stat. 1180). 2. Amend Appendix D to Part 91 by revising section 1 introductory text to read as follows: ■ Appendix D to Part 91—Airports/ Locations: Special Operating Restrictions Section 1. Locations at which the requirements of § 91.215(b)(2) and § 91.225(d)(2) apply. The requirements of §§ 91.215(b)(2) and 91.225(d)(2) apply below 10,000 feet MSL within a 30-nautical-mile radius of each location in the following list. * * * * * Issued in Washington, DC, on October 1, 2010. Pamela Hamilton-Powell, Director, Office of Rulemaking. [FR Doc. 2010–25102 Filed 10–5–10; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–13–P DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 21 CFR Part 1306 [Docket No. DEA–339S] Role of Authorized Agents in Communicating Controlled Substance Prescriptions to Pharmacies Drug Enforcement Administration, Department of Justice. ACTION: Statement of policy. WReier-Aviles on DSKGBLS3C1PROD with RULES AGENCY: The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) is issuing this statement of policy to provide guidance under existing law regarding the proper role of a duly authorized agent of a DEA-registered individual practitioner VerDate Mar<15>2010 15:06 Oct 05, 2010 Jkt 223001 Legal Authority DEA implements and enforces Titles II and III of the Comprehensive Drug Abuse Prevention and Control Act of 1970, often referred to as the Controlled Substances Act (CSA) and the Controlled Substances Import and Export Act (CSIEA) (21 U.S.C. 801–971), as amended. DEA publishes the implementing regulations for these statutes in title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), parts 1300 through 1321. These regulations are designed to ensure that there is a sufficient supply of controlled substances for legitimate medical, scientific, research, and industrial purposes and to deter the diversion of controlled substances to illegal purposes. Controlled substances are drugs that have a potential for abuse and dependence; these include substances classified as opioids, stimulants, depressants, hallucinogens, anabolic steroids, and drugs that are immediate precursors of these classes of substances. The CSA mandates that DEA establish a closed system of control for manufacturing, distributing, and dispensing controlled substances. Any person who manufactures, distributes, dispenses, imports, exports, or conducts research or chemical analysis with controlled substances must register with DEA (unless exempt) and comply with the applicable requirements for the activity. Background Drug Enforcement Administration SUMMARY: in connection with the communication of a controlled substance prescription to a pharmacy. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mark W. Caverly, Chief, Liaison and Policy Section, Office of Diversion Control, Drug Enforcement Administration, 8701 Morrissette Drive, Springfield, VA 22152; telephone (202) 307–7297. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Under longstanding Federal law, controlled substances are strictly regulated to ensure a sufficient supply for legitimate medical, scientific, research, and industrial purposes and to deter diversion of controlled substances to illegal purposes. The substances are regulated because of their potential for abuse and likelihood to cause dependence when abused and because of their serious and potentially unsafe nature if not used under proper circumstances. To minimize the likelihood that pharmaceutical controlled substances would be diverted into illicit channels, Congress established under the CSA a closed system of drug distribution for PO 00000 Frm 00025 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 61613 legitimate handlers of controlled substances. The foundation of this system is the concept of registration. The only persons who may lawfully manufacture, distribute and dispense controlled substances under the CSA are those who have obtained a DEA registration authorizing them to do so. 21 U.S.C. 822. Thus, the prescribing of controlled substances may be carried out only by those practitioners who have obtained a DEA registration authorizing such activity. To be eligible for a DEA registration as a practitioner under the CSA, one must be a physician, dentist, veterinarian, hospital, or other person licensed, registered, or otherwise permitted by the United States or the State in which he or she practices to dispense controlled substances in the course of professional practice. 21 U.S.C. 802(21), 823(f). Thus, State licensure to prescribe controlled substances is generally a prerequisite to obtaining a DEA registration to do so. The term ‘‘individual practitioner’’ excludes institutions such as hospitals, which are themselves DEA registrants and are permitted to administer and dispense, but not prescribe, controlled substances under their registration. 21 CFR 1300.01(b)(17). By longstanding statutory requirement, a valid prescription issued by a DEA-registered practitioner is required for dispensing a controlled substance. To be effective (i.e., valid), a prescription for a controlled substance must be issued for a legitimate medical purpose by a practitioner acting in the usual course of professional practice. United States v. Moore, 423 U.S. 122 (1975); 21 CFR 1306.04(a). Thus, the practitioner must determine that a prescription for a controlled substance is for a legitimate medical purpose. While the core responsibilities pertaining to prescribing controlled substances may not be delegated to anyone else, an individual practitioner may authorize an agent to perform a limited role in communicating such prescriptions to a pharmacy in order to make the prescription process more efficient. Nonetheless, it is important to understand that any agency relationship must also preserve the requirement that medical determinations to prescribe controlled substances be made by a practitioner only, not by an agent. Accordingly, this statement of policy outlines DEA’s existing statutory and regulatory requirements as to the proper role of duly authorized agents of individual practitioners. DEA anticipates the utilization of electronic prescribing by practitioners for E:\FR\FM\06OCR1.SGM 06OCR1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 75, Number 193 (Wednesday, October 6, 2010)]
[Rules and Regulations]
[Pages 61612-61613]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2010-25102]


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DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

Federal Aviation Administration

14 CFR Part 91

[Docket No. FAA-2010-0995; Amendment No. 91-319]


Airports/Locations: Special Operating Restrictions

AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT.

ACTION: Final rule; technical amendment.

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SUMMARY: The FAA is amending its airports and locations special 
operating restrictions regulation to clarify a minor discrepancy in 
terminology. This amendment standardizes the language used to describe 
the altitude at which aircraft operating within 30 nautical miles of 
the listed airports are required to be equipped with an altitude 
encoding transponder. This action is not making any substantive changes 
to the regulation.

DATES: Effective: October 6, 2010.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ellen Crum, Air Traffic Systems 
Operations, Airspace and Rules Group, 800 Independence Ave. SW., 
Washington, DC 20591; telephone (202) 267-8783; e-mail 
ellen.crum@faa.gov.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: 

Background

    On November 30, 1999 (64 FR 66768), the FAA published a final rule 
that revised 14 CFR part 91. In the final rule, Sec.  91.215(b)(2) 
states ``* * *from the surface upward to 10,000 MSL* * *'' The 
corresponding text in section 1 of Appendix D should be consistent in 
describing the altitude as ``MSL'' but inadvertently was changed from 
MSL to ``above the surface.'' Therefore, this action will correct this 
inconsistency and change the phrase from ``above the surface'' to 
``MSL'' in section 1 of Appendix D.
    As this rule simply corrects an inconsistency in the terminology 
used to describe altitudes, good cause exists for adopting this 
amendment without public notice or comment as provided under 5 U.S.C. 
553(b). Furthermore, the FAA finds that good cause exists pursuant to 5 
U.S.C. 553(d) for making

[[Page 61613]]

this rule effective within less than 30 days.

List of Subjects in 14 CFR Part 91

    Air traffic control, Aircraft, Airmen, Airports, Aviation safety.

The Amendment

0
In consideration of the foregoing, the Federal Aviation Administration 
amends Chapter I of Title 14, Code of Federal Regulations, as follows:

PART 91--GENERAL OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES

0
1. The authority citation for part 91 continues to read as follows:

    Authority:  49 U.S.C. 106(g), 1155, 40103, 40113, 40120, 44101, 
44111, 44701, 44704, 44709, 44711, 44712, 44715, 44716, 44717, 
44722, 46306, 46315, 46316, 46504, 46506-46507, 47122, 47508, 47528-
47531, articles 12 and 29 of the Convention on International Civil 
Aviation (61 Stat. 1180).


0
2. Amend Appendix D to Part 91 by revising section 1 introductory text 
to read as follows:

Appendix D to Part 91--Airports/Locations: Special Operating 
Restrictions

    Section 1. Locations at which the requirements of Sec.  
91.215(b)(2) and Sec.  91.225(d)(2) apply. The requirements of 
Sec. Sec.  91.215(b)(2) and 91.225(d)(2) apply below 10,000 feet MSL 
within a 30-nautical-mile radius of each location in the following 
list.
* * * * *


    Issued in Washington, DC, on October 1, 2010.
Pamela Hamilton-Powell,
Director, Office of Rulemaking.
[FR Doc. 2010-25102 Filed 10-5-10; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4910-13-P