Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA, 58424-58425 [2010-23921]

Download as PDF 58424 Federal Register / Vol. 75, No. 185 / Friday, September 24, 2010 / Notices srobinson on DSKHWCL6B1PROD with NOTICES agencies, including whether the information will have practical utility; (b) the accuracy of our estimate of the burden (hours and cost) of the collection of information, including the validity of the methodology and assumptions used; (c) ways we could enhance the quality, utility and clarity of the information to be collected; and (d) ways we could minimize the burden of the collection of the information on the respondents, such as through the use of automated collection techniques or other forms of information technology. Please note that an agency may not sponsor or conduct, and an individual need not respond to, a collection of information unless it has a valid OMB Control Number. It is our policy to make all comments available to the public for review at the location listed in the ADDRESSES section during the hours of 9 a.m.–5 p.m., Eastern Time, Monday through Friday except for legal holidays. Before including your address, phone number, e-mail address or other personally identifiable information, be advised that your entire comment—including your personally identifiable information— may be made public at any time. While you may request that we withhold your personally identifiable information, we cannot guarantee that we will be able to do so. III. Data OMB Control Number: 1076–0135. Title: Reporting System for Public Law 102–477 Demonstration Project. Brief Description of Collection: Public Law 102–477 authorizes tribal governments to integrate federallyfunded employment, training and related services programs into a single, coordinated, comprehensive delivery plan. Interior has made available a single universal format for Statistical Reports for tribal governments to report on integrated activities undertaken within their projects, and a single universal format for Financial Reports for tribal governments to report on all project expenditures. Respondents that participate in Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) must provide additional information on these forms. Type of Review: Extension without change of a currently approved collection. Respondents: Indian tribes participating in Public Law 102–477. Number of Respondents: 65 grantees representing 265 Indian tribes. Total Number of Responses: 230. Frequency of Response: Each respondent must supply the information for the Financial Status Report and Public Law 102–477 Demonstration VerDate Mar<15>2010 16:12 Sep 23, 2010 Jkt 220001 Project Statistical Report once. Approximately 35 of the respondents participant in TANF and must also provide information associated with that program. Estimated Time per Response: Ranges from 2 to 40 hours. Estimated Total Annual Hour Burden: 3,840 hours. Estimated Total Annual Non-Hour Cost Burden: $325. Dated: September 20, 2010. Alvin Foster, Acting Chief Information Officer—Indian Affairs . [FR Doc. 2010–23913 Filed 9–23–10; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4310–4J–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate cultural items in the possession of the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, aka Eastern Washington State Historical Society, Spokane, WA, that meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the cultural items. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. The funerary objects described below were excavated by Donald Collier, Alfred E. Hudson and Arlo Ford due to the construction of the Grand Coulee Dam and its reservoir (Lake Roosevelt) whose waters would soon cover the area. This undertaking was known as ‘‘The Columbian Basin Archaeological Survey’’ or the ‘‘Collier, Hudson, and Ford Project.’’ It was a multiinstitutional venture involving the Eastern Washington State Historical Society (now Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture), University of Washington, and the State College of Washington (now Washington State University). It was also a multi-agency venture involving the Bureau of Reclamation, Bureau of Indian Affairs, PO 00000 Frm 00078 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Civilian Conservation Corps, and the Works Project Administration (including the National Youth Administration). In 1940, the Eastern Washington State Historical Society became the repository for the collection, as mandated by the Bureau of Reclamation. Portions of the land from which the funerary objects derive were non-Federal lands, and other portions were Federal lands at the time of removal. Moreover, the Federal lands fell under the management authority of several different agencies. Consequently, there has been a question of control over the collection. After several years of research, the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture has been unable to determine additional specifics regarding the control of each site. Therefore, absent additional information, the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture is assuming responsibility under NAGPRA with regard to publishing this Notice and repatriating the unassociated funerary objects to the culturally affiliated tribe. During the period July 1939 September 1940, funerary objects were systematically removed from Site 2 (45– LI–27), Lincoln County, WA, by Donald Collier, Alfred E. Hudson and Arlo Ford due to the construction of the Grand Coulee Dam and its reservoir (Lake Roosevelt), and they were accessioned by the museum in 1940 (EWSHS Accession ι1027). The three unassociated funerary objects are one abalone pendant and two projectile points. During the period July 1939 September 1940, funerary objects were systematically removed from Site 7A (45–FE–7), Ferry County, WA, by Collier, Hudson and Ford due to the construction of the Grand Coulee Dam and its reservoir (Lake Roosevelt), and they were accessioned by the museum in 1940 (EWSHS Accession #1027). The 42 unassociated funerary objects are 7 beaver tooth dice, 1 bone awl pendant, 27 dentalia beads, 4 copper pendants, 1 copper bracelet, 1 projectile point and 1 bone awl. During the period July 1939 September 1940, funerary objects were systematically removed from Site 24 (45–FE–24), Ferry County, WA, by Collier, Hudson and Ford due to the construction of the Grand Coulee Dam and its reservoir (Lake Roosevelt), and they were accessioned by the museum in 1940 (EWSHS Accession #1027). The 92 unassociated funerary objects are 7 wooden burial markers , 1 dentalia fragment, 5 glass beads, 9 perforated bear claws, 1 carved beaver tooth, 3 copper bells, 1 lot of burial fill, 22 dentalia beads, 2 buckskin or leather E:\FR\FM\24SEN1.SGM 24SEN1 srobinson on DSKHWCL6B1PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 75, No. 185 / Friday, September 24, 2010 / Notices fragments, 2 antler digging sticks, 1 abalone shell pendant, 2 scrapers, 2 bone awls, 1 piece of matting, 1 flake, 2 dentalia necklace fragments, 1 small box of dentalia beads, 1 bone needle, 1 copper pendant, 18 rolled copper beads, 6 dentalium, 1 piece of cordage, 1 long jadeite celt and 1 chipped flint fragment. During the period July 1939 September 1940, funerary objects were systematically removed from Site 46 (45–Stevens–46), Stevens County, WA, by Collier, Hudson and Ford due to the construction of the Grand Coulee Dam and its reservoir (Lake Roosevelt), and they were accessioned by the museum in 1940 (EWSHS Accession #1027). The 78 unassociated funerary objects are 6 pieces worked bone, 1 jadeite chip, 1 jadeite celt, 44 bone implements, 3 stone pipes, 3 projectile points, 3 schist scrapers, 1 mussel shell, 1 antler wedge, 1 slate needle, 1 slate pendant, 1 pipe fragment, 1 bone awl, 1 slate object, 1 lot of turgite paint material, 1 arrow shaft smoother, 2 hematite pieces, 3 knives, 1 spear point, 1 antler and 1 antler horn implement. During the period July 1939 September 1940, funerary objects were systematically removed from Site 47 (45–ST–47), Stevens County, WA, by Collier, Hudson and Ford due to the construction of the Grand Coulee Dam and its reservoir (Lake Roosevelt), and they were accessioned by the museum in 1940 (EWSHS Accession #1027). The 64 unassociated funerary objects are 1 copper bracelet, 7 projectile points, 6 bone combs, 1 bone implement, 1 bone spearpoint, 2 bone whistles, 27 bone awls, 2 copper and shell pendants, 1 spear point, 1 carved stone pipe, 1 jadeite celt, 1 jadeite adze, 2 bone ornaments (possible combs), 1 bone flute fragment, 1 coiled basket, 1 turquoise pendant, 1 dentalia, 2 abalone pendants, 3 glass beads and 1 arrow shaft smoother. The unassociated funerary objects described above are consistent with cultural items typically found in context with Native American burials in eastern Washington State. Furthermore, accession numbers, as well as field notes and journal entries, indicate that the cultural items were found in connection with human remains. Extensive museum documentation, the geographic locations of the sites, burial patterns, and consultation from the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Indian Reservation, Washington, verify that the cultural items were removed from sites that are within the aboriginal territory of the bands of Indians that now make up the Confederated Tribes of VerDate Mar<15>2010 16:12 Sep 23, 2010 Jkt 220001 the Colville Indian Reservation, Washington. Officials of the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(B), the 279 cultural items described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony and are believed, by a preponderance of the evidence, to have been removed from a specific burial site of a Native American individual. Officials of the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the unassociated funerary objects and the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Indian Reservation, Washington. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believe themselves to be culturally affiliated with the unassociated funerary objects should contact Mr. Michael Holloman, Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA 99201, telephone (509) 363–5337, before October 25, 2010. Repatriation of the unassociated funerary objects to the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Indian Reservation, Washington, may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture is responsible for notifying The Confederated Tribes of the Colville Indian Reservation, Washington, that this notice has been published. Dated: September 10, 2010 Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2010–23921 Filed 9–23–10; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. AGENCY: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate cultural items in the possession of the American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY, that meets the definition of unassociated funerary objects under 25 U.S.C. 3001. PO 00000 Frm 00079 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 58425 This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the cultural items. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. In 1902, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were collected by Dr. Ales Hrdlicka from a cave in the vicinity of Sacaton, Pinal County, AZ, while Dr. Hrdlicka was a member of the Hyde Expedition, sponsored by the American Museum of Natural History. No known individual was identified. This individual has been identified as Native American based on the American Museum of Natural History’s catalog entry describing the remains as a ‘‘Pima ... medicine man.’’ The two associated funerary objects were a pair of metal spurs. In 2006, the human remains and the metal spurs were repatriated to the Gila River Indian Community. Subsequently, the American Museum of Natural History discovered among its collections additional funerary objects associated with this repatriated individual, but not previously reported. Therefore, these additional funerary objects are now considered to be unassociated. The 32 unassociated funerary objects are elements of 1 percussion musket (a barrel and trigger and a percussion lock); 1 leather bullet pouch and its contents (12 metal ball bullets, 3 spent percussion caps, 1 shell casing, 3 glass marbles, 1 piece of cloth and 1 lot of paper scraps); 1 metal flask; 1 teacup; 1 saucer; 1 pressed metal spoon; 2 blue glass beads; 2 claws and 1 piece of sewn rawhide. The metal flask is painted green and has a knotted cloth plug. The tea cup and saucer are white glazed ceramic. The two beads are made of blue glass. The two claws are from a jaguar. The rawhide piece is sewn with a rawhide thong. The geographic location is consistent with the post-contact territory of the Pima, who are represented by the Ak Chin Indian Community of the Maricopa (Ak Chin) Indian Reservation, Arizona; the Gila River Indian Community of the Gila River Indian Reservation, Arizona; and the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community of the Salt River Reservation, Arizona. The presence of items such as metal spurs, a rifle and white ceramic teacup suggest a post-contact date for this burial. Officials of the American Museum of Natural History have determined that, E:\FR\FM\24SEN1.SGM 24SEN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 75, Number 185 (Friday, September 24, 2010)]
[Notices]
[Pages 58424-58425]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2010-23921]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service


Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Northwest Museum 
of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

    Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves 
Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent 
to repatriate cultural items in the possession of the Northwest Museum 
of Arts & Culture, aka Eastern Washington State Historical Society, 
Spokane, WA, that meet the definition of unassociated funerary objects 
under 25 U.S.C. 3001.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The 
determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the cultural 
items. The National Park Service is not responsible for the 
determinations in this notice.
    The funerary objects described below were excavated by Donald 
Collier, Alfred E. Hudson and Arlo Ford due to the construction of the 
Grand Coulee Dam and its reservoir (Lake Roosevelt) whose waters would 
soon cover the area. This undertaking was known as ``The Columbian 
Basin Archaeological Survey'' or the ``Collier, Hudson, and Ford 
Project.'' It was a multi-institutional venture involving the Eastern 
Washington State Historical Society (now Northwest Museum of Arts & 
Culture), University of Washington, and the State College of Washington 
(now Washington State University). It was also a multi-agency venture 
involving the Bureau of Reclamation, Bureau of Indian Affairs, Civilian 
Conservation Corps, and the Works Project Administration (including the 
National Youth Administration). In 1940, the Eastern Washington State 
Historical Society became the repository for the collection, as 
mandated by the Bureau of Reclamation. Portions of the land from which 
the funerary objects derive were non-Federal lands, and other portions 
were Federal lands at the time of removal. Moreover, the Federal lands 
fell under the management authority of several different agencies. 
Consequently, there has been a question of control over the collection. 
After several years of research, the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture 
has been unable to determine additional specifics regarding the control 
of each site. Therefore, absent additional information, the Northwest 
Museum of Arts & Culture is assuming responsibility under NAGPRA with 
regard to publishing this Notice and repatriating the unassociated 
funerary objects to the culturally affiliated tribe.
    During the period July 1939 - September 1940, funerary objects were 
systematically removed from Site 2 (45-LI-27), Lincoln County, WA, by 
Donald Collier, Alfred E. Hudson and Arlo Ford due to the construction 
of the Grand Coulee Dam and its reservoir (Lake Roosevelt), and they 
were accessioned by the museum in 1940 (EWSHS Accession 1027). 
The three unassociated funerary objects are one abalone pendant and two 
projectile points.
    During the period July 1939 - September 1940, funerary objects were 
systematically removed from Site 7A (45-FE-7), Ferry County, WA, by 
Collier, Hudson and Ford due to the construction of the Grand Coulee 
Dam and its reservoir (Lake Roosevelt), and they were accessioned by 
the museum in 1940 (EWSHS Accession 1027). The 42 unassociated 
funerary objects are 7 beaver tooth dice, 1 bone awl pendant, 27 
dentalia beads, 4 copper pendants, 1 copper bracelet, 1 projectile 
point and 1 bone awl.
    During the period July 1939 - September 1940, funerary objects were 
systematically removed from Site 24 (45-FE-24), Ferry County, WA, by 
Collier, Hudson and Ford due to the construction of the Grand Coulee 
Dam and its reservoir (Lake Roosevelt), and they were accessioned by 
the museum in 1940 (EWSHS Accession 1027). The 92 unassociated 
funerary objects are 7 wooden burial markers , 1 dentalia fragment, 5 
glass beads, 9 perforated bear claws, 1 carved beaver tooth, 3 copper 
bells, 1 lot of burial fill, 22 dentalia beads, 2 buckskin or leather

[[Page 58425]]

fragments, 2 antler digging sticks, 1 abalone shell pendant, 2 
scrapers, 2 bone awls, 1 piece of matting, 1 flake, 2 dentalia necklace 
fragments, 1 small box of dentalia beads, 1 bone needle, 1 copper 
pendant, 18 rolled copper beads, 6 dentalium, 1 piece of cordage, 1 
long jadeite celt and 1 chipped flint fragment.
    During the period July 1939 - September 1940, funerary objects were 
systematically removed from Site 46 (45-Stevens-46), Stevens County, 
WA, by Collier, Hudson and Ford due to the construction of the Grand 
Coulee Dam and its reservoir (Lake Roosevelt), and they were 
accessioned by the museum in 1940 (EWSHS Accession 1027). The 
78 unassociated funerary objects are 6 pieces worked bone, 1 jadeite 
chip, 1 jadeite celt, 44 bone implements, 3 stone pipes, 3 projectile 
points, 3 schist scrapers, 1 mussel shell, 1 antler wedge, 1 slate 
needle, 1 slate pendant, 1 pipe fragment, 1 bone awl, 1 slate object, 1 
lot of turgite paint material, 1 arrow shaft smoother, 2 hematite 
pieces, 3 knives, 1 spear point, 1 antler and 1 antler horn implement.
    During the period July 1939 - September 1940, funerary objects were 
systematically removed from Site 47 (45-ST-47), Stevens County, WA, by 
Collier, Hudson and Ford due to the construction of the Grand Coulee 
Dam and its reservoir (Lake Roosevelt), and they were accessioned by 
the museum in 1940 (EWSHS Accession 1027). The 64 unassociated 
funerary objects are 1 copper bracelet, 7 projectile points, 6 bone 
combs, 1 bone implement, 1 bone spearpoint, 2 bone whistles, 27 bone 
awls, 2 copper and shell pendants, 1 spear point, 1 carved stone pipe, 
1 jadeite celt, 1 jadeite adze, 2 bone ornaments (possible combs), 1 
bone flute fragment, 1 coiled basket, 1 turquoise pendant, 1 dentalia, 
2 abalone pendants, 3 glass beads and 1 arrow shaft smoother.
    The unassociated funerary objects described above are consistent 
with cultural items typically found in context with Native American 
burials in eastern Washington State. Furthermore, accession numbers, as 
well as field notes and journal entries, indicate that the cultural 
items were found in connection with human remains. Extensive museum 
documentation, the geographic locations of the sites, burial patterns, 
and consultation from the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Indian 
Reservation, Washington, verify that the cultural items were removed 
from sites that are within the aboriginal territory of the bands of 
Indians that now make up the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Indian 
Reservation, Washington.
    Officials of the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture have determined 
that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(B), the 279 cultural items 
described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or 
near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of 
the death rite or ceremony and are believed, by a preponderance of the 
evidence, to have been removed from a specific burial site of a Native 
American individual. Officials of the Northwest Museum of Arts & 
Culture also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there 
is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably 
traced between the unassociated funerary objects and the Confederated 
Tribes of the Colville Indian Reservation, Washington.
    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believe themselves 
to be culturally affiliated with the unassociated funerary objects 
should contact Mr. Michael Holloman, Northwest Museum of Arts & 
Culture, Spokane, WA 99201, telephone (509) 363-5337, before October 
25, 2010. Repatriation of the unassociated funerary objects to the 
Confederated Tribes of the Colville Indian Reservation, Washington, may 
proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward.
    The Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture is responsible for notifying 
The Confederated Tribes of the Colville Indian Reservation, Washington, 
that this notice has been published.

    Dated: September 10, 2010
Sherry Hutt,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2010-23921 Filed 9-23-10; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-S