Notice of Inventory Completion: Homer Society of Natural History, Pratt Museum, Homer, AK, 52368-52369 [2010-21190]

Download as PDF srobinson on DSKHWCL6B1PROD with NOTICES 52368 Federal Register / Vol. 75, No. 164 / Wednesday, August 25, 2010 / Notices individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Based on the skeletal and dental morphology, as well as accession records, officials of the Memphis Pink Palace Museum have determined that the above-mentioned human remains are Native American. Based on the ceramic styles and construction of pottery related to the sites, but that are not associated funerary objects, the human remains can be associated with the Nodena, Parkin and Walls Phases of the Late Mississippian and protohistoric periods (A.D. 1350–1650). Oral traditional and archeological evidence indicate that the Quapaw occupied and hunted in the central Mississippi Valley, including the modern city of Memphis, TN, for generations prior to European contact. Historical documentation identifies Quapaw villages located on both sides of the Mississippi River in the Central Mississippi Valley as early as the mid– 1500s. Based on historical and archeological evidence, the Bradley site (3CT7) has been identified as Pacaha, the principal town of the Pacaha chiefdom during the DeSoto entrada in Arkansas (A.D. 1541–1543). Linguistic evidence indicates a possible link between the ‘‘Capaha’’ (a.k.a. Pacaha) in a Spanish account, and a late 17th century Quapaw Indian village name ‘‘Kappaha’’ or ‘‘Kappa.’’ French maps and documents (A.D. 1673–1720), indicate that only the Quapaw had villages on both sides of the Mississippi River in eastern Arkansas and western Mississippi, and much of northeastern Arkansas was hunting territory. Therefore, the sites are within the traditional territory of the Quapaw. Descendants of the Quapaw are members of the Quapaw Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma. Finally, the Quapaw Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma, under the NAGPRA process, have previously repatriated Native American human remains and associated funerary objects, and have been determined to be culturally affiliated with the cultural assemblages fround on archeological sites related to Nodena, Parkin and Walls phases. Officials of the Memphis Pink Palace Museum have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of 17 individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of the Memphis Pink Palace Museum also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human VerDate Mar<15>2010 17:48 Aug 24, 2010 Jkt 220001 remains and the Quapaw Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Louella Weaver, Memphis Pink Palace Museum, 3050 Central Ave., Memphis, TN 38111, telephone (901) 320–6322, before September 24, 2010. Repatriation of the human remains to the Quapaw Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma, may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The Memphis Pink Palace Museum is responsible for notifying the Quapaw Tribe of Indians, Oklahoma, that this notice has been published. Dated: August 19, 2010 David Tarler, Acting Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2010–21186 Filed 8–4–10; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Homer Society of Natural History, Pratt Museum, Homer, AK National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains in the possession of the Homer Society of Natural History, Pratt Museum, Homer, AK. The human remains were removed from Kachemak Bay, AK. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Pratt Museum professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Kenaitze Indian Tribe and the Seldovia Village Tribe. In the summers of 1987 and 1988, human remains representing five individuals were removed from the Point West of Halibut Cove Site (SEL– 010), formally known as Calhoun’s Point, in Kachemak Bay, AK. The Pratt Museum sponsored the excavation of PO 00000 Frm 00067 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 SEL–010, an archeological site on private land. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. The Point West of Halibut Cove Site dates to A.D. 1260 – A.D. 1418, and has two components. The site includes a Precontact period Dena’ina house built into a prehistoric Marine Kachemak tradition (Sugpiaq Alutiiq tradition) midden. Two burials were inside the midden. Once the crew determined that they were human, the remains were covered and excavation in that area ceased. No funerary artifacts were seen or removed. The human remains from the excavation in the Pratt Museum are isolates from the middle of a midden that consisted of thousands of animal bones and shell fragments, and some artifacts. As the human remains do not comprise a burial, these artifacts are not considered to be funerary objects. In the 1970s, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were removed from Kachemak Bay, AK. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In the 1980s, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were removed from the surface of a beach on Kachemak Bay, AK, by a private individual. The human remains were given to the education department, but were never accessioned. In 2010, the human remains were found in the education department’s collection. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In the 1990s, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were removed from near Cottonwood Creek Bluff, Kachemak Bay, AK, by a private individual. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. The archeological and documentary evidence are in agreement that the Kachemak Bay was used by both the ancestors of the Seldovia Village (Dena’ina Athabascan and Sugpiaq Alutiiq) and Kenaitze Indian (Dena’ina Athabascan) tribal members. Kachemak Bay is the historically documented territory of both the Seldovia Village Tribe and Kenaitze Indian Tribe. Officials of the Pratt Museum have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of eight individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of the Pratt Museum also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and the E:\FR\FM\25AUN1.SGM 25AUN1 Federal Register / Vol. 75, No. 164 / Wednesday, August 25, 2010 / Notices Kenaitze Indian Tribe and Seldovia Village Tribe. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the Native American human remains should contact Dr. Cusack-McVeigh, Pratt Museum, 3779 Bartlett St., Homer, AK 99603, telephone (907) 235–8635, ext. 36, before September 24, 2010. Repatriation of the human remains to the Kenaitze Indian Tribe and the Seldovia Village Tribe may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The Pratt Museum is responsible for notifying the Kenaitze Indian Tribe and the Seldovia Village Tribe that this notice has been published. Dated: August 19, 2010 David Tarler, Acting Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2010–21190 Filed 8–24–10; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, Portland, OR National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: srobinson on DSKHWCL6B1PROD with NOTICES Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and an associated funerary object in the possession of the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, Portland, OR. The human remains were removed from an area in the vicinity of The Dalles, OR. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary object. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains and associated funerary object was made by Oregon Museum of Science and Industry professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. In the 1930s or early 1940s, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were removed from an area VerDate Mar<15>2010 17:48 Aug 24, 2010 Jkt 220001 in the vicinity of the city of The Dalles, Wasco County, OR, by Alonzo Hancock. Mr. Hancock removed the remains after they had been excavated during construction work on the south side of a roadcut. The exact location of the road is unclear from museum records. Mr. Hancock donated the human remains to the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry in 1946. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. The human remains have been identified as Native American based on observable dental traits and museum documentation that refers to the human remains as ‘‘Chinook.’’ In the 1930s, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were removed from an area in the vicinity of the city of The Dalles, Wasco County, OR, by an unknown individual. The exact location of the area is unclear from museum records. The human remains were donated to the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry by an unknown individual sometime between the 1940s and the 1970s. No known individual was identified. The one associated funerary object is a copper earring. The human remains have been identified as Native American based on observable dental traits and the type of associated funerary object. The Dalles, OR, is within the traditional territory of the present-day Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon, which is composed of Wasco, Warm Springs, and Paiute bands and tribes. The Columbia River-based Wasco were the easternmost group of Chinookan-speaking Indians. The Sahaptin-speaking Warm Springs bands lived along the Columbia’s tributaries. The Paiutes speak a Shoshonean dialect and traditionally lived in southeastern Oregon. The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon peoples also traditionally shared this area with the fourteen Sahaptin-, Salish-, and Chinookan-speaking tribes and bands of the present-day Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Washington. The traditional territory of the Yakama included the Washington side of the Columbia River between the eastern slopes of the Cascade Range and the lower Yakima River watershed. Officials of the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of two individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry also have determined that, pursuant to 25 PO 00000 Frm 00068 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 52369 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the one object described above is reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials of the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary object and the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon and the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Indian Nation, Washington. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary object should contact Lori Erickson, Curator, Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, 1945 SE Water Ave., Portland, OR 97214, telephone (503) 797–4582, before September 24, 2010. Repatriation of the human remains and associated funerary object to the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon and the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Washington, may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The Oregon Museum of Science and Industry is responsible for notifying the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon and the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Washington, that this notice has been published. Dated: August 19, 2010 David Tarler, Acting Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2010–21188 Filed 8–24–10; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Wisconsin Historical Society, Museum Division, Madison, WI National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and an associated funerary object in the possession of the Wisconsin Historical Society (aka State Historical Society of Wisconsin), Museum Division, Madison, WI. The human remains and associated funerary E:\FR\FM\25AUN1.SGM 25AUN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 75, Number 164 (Wednesday, August 25, 2010)]
[Notices]
[Pages 52368-52369]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2010-21190]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service


Notice of Inventory Completion: Homer Society of Natural History, 
Pratt Museum, Homer, AK

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

    Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves 
Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the 
completion of an inventory of human remains in the possession of the 
Homer Society of Natural History, Pratt Museum, Homer, AK. The human 
remains were removed from Kachemak Bay, AK.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The 
determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible 
for the determinations in this notice.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Pratt Museum 
professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Kenaitze 
Indian Tribe and the Seldovia Village Tribe.

    In the summers of 1987 and 1988, human remains representing five 
individuals were removed from the Point West of Halibut Cove Site (SEL-
010), formally known as Calhoun's Point, in Kachemak Bay, AK. The Pratt 
Museum sponsored the excavation of SEL-010, an archeological site on 
private land. No known individuals were identified. No associated 
funerary objects are present.
    The Point West of Halibut Cove Site dates to A.D. 1260 - A.D. 1418, 
and has two components. The site includes a Precontact period Dena'ina 
house built into a prehistoric Marine Kachemak tradition (Sugpiaq 
Alutiiq tradition) midden. Two burials were inside the midden. Once the 
crew determined that they were human, the remains were covered and 
excavation in that area ceased. No funerary artifacts were seen or 
removed. The human remains from the excavation in the Pratt Museum are 
isolates from the middle of a midden that consisted of thousands of 
animal bones and shell fragments, and some artifacts. As the human 
remains do not comprise a burial, these artifacts are not considered to 
be funerary objects.
    In the 1970s, human remains representing a minimum of one 
individual were removed from Kachemak Bay, AK. No known individual was 
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    In the 1980s, human remains representing a minimum of one 
individual were removed from the surface of a beach on Kachemak Bay, 
AK, by a private individual. The human remains were given to the 
education department, but were never accessioned. In 2010, the human 
remains were found in the education department's collection. No known 
individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    In the 1990s, human remains representing a minimum of one 
individual were removed from near Cottonwood Creek Bluff, Kachemak Bay, 
AK, by a private individual. No known individual was identified. No 
associated funerary objects are present.
    The archeological and documentary evidence are in agreement that 
the Kachemak Bay was used by both the ancestors of the Seldovia Village 
(Dena'ina Athabascan and Sugpiaq Alutiiq) and Kenaitze Indian (Dena'ina 
Athabascan) tribal members. Kachemak Bay is the historically documented 
territory of both the Seldovia Village Tribe and Kenaitze Indian Tribe.
    Officials of the Pratt Museum have determined that, pursuant to 25 
U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described above represent the 
physical remains of eight individuals of Native American ancestry. 
Officials of the Pratt Museum also have determined that, pursuant to 25 
U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that 
can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and 
the

[[Page 52369]]

Kenaitze Indian Tribe and Seldovia Village Tribe.
    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with the Native American human remains should 
contact Dr. Cusack-McVeigh, Pratt Museum, 3779 Bartlett St., Homer, AK 
99603, telephone (907) 235-8635, ext. 36, before September 24, 2010. 
Repatriation of the human remains to the Kenaitze Indian Tribe and the 
Seldovia Village Tribe may proceed after that date if no additional 
claimants come forward.
    The Pratt Museum is responsible for notifying the Kenaitze Indian 
Tribe and the Seldovia Village Tribe that this notice has been 
published.

    Dated: August 19, 2010
David Tarler,
Acting Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2010-21190 Filed 8-24-10; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-S