Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Colorado Museum, Boulder, CO, 52019-52021 [2010-20954]

Download as PDF wwoods2 on DSK1DXX6B1PROD with NOTICES_PART 1 Federal Register / Vol. 75, No. 163 / Tuesday, August 24, 2010 / Notices corrugated ceramics, inhumation burials, cradleboard cranial deformation, grooved stone axes and bone artifacts. The combination of the material culture attributes and a subsistence pattern that included hunting and gathering augmented by maize agriculture helps to recognize an identifiable earlier group. Archeologists have also remarked that there are strong similarities between this earlier group and present-day tribes included in the Western Pueblo ethnographic group, especially including the Hopi Tribe of Arizona and the Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico. The similarities in ceramic traditions, burial practices, architectural forms and settlement patterns have led archeologists to believe that the prehistoric inhabitants of the Mogollon Rim region migrated north and west to the Hopi mesas, and north and east to the Zuni River Valley. Certain objects found in Upland Mogollon archeological sites have been found to have strong resemblances with ritual paraphernalia that are used in continuing religious practices by the Hopi and Zuni. Some petroglyphs on the Fort Apache Indian Reservation have also persuaded archeologists of continuities between the earlier identified group and current-day Western Pueblo people. Biological information from the site of Grasshopper Pueblo, which is located in close proximity to the five sites listed above, supports the view that the prehistoric occupants of the Upland Mogollon region had migrated from various locations to the north and west of the region. The archeological evidence for migration is paralleled by Hopi and Zuni oral traditions. Migration figures prominently in Hopi oral tradition, which refers to the ancient sites, pottery, stone tools, petroglyphs and other artifacts left behind by the ancestors as ‘‘Hopi Footprints.’’ This migration history is complex and detailed and includes traditions relating specific clans to the Mogollon region. Hopi cultural advisors have also identified medicinal and culinary plants at archeological sites in the region. Their knowledge about these plants was passed down to them from the ancestors who inhabited these ancient sites. Migration is also an important attribute of Zuni oral tradition and includes accounts of Zuni ancestors passing through the Upland Mogollon region. The ancient villages mark the routes of these migrations. Zuni cultural advisors remark that the ancient sites were not abandoned. People returned to these VerDate Mar<15>2010 15:00 Aug 23, 2010 Jkt 220001 places from time to time, either to reoccupy them or for the purpose of religious pilgrimages — a practice that has continued to the present-day. Archeologists have found ceramic evidence at shrines in the Upland Mogollon region that confirms these reports. Zuni cultural advisors have names for plants endemic to the Mogollon region which do not grow on the Zuni Reservation. They also have knowledge about traditional medicinal and ceremonial uses for these resources, which has been passed down to them from their ancestors. Furthermore, Hopi and Zuni cultural advisors have recognized that their ancestors may have been co-resident at some of the sites in this region during their ancestral migrations. There are differing points of view regarding the possible presence of Apache people in the Upland Mogollon region during the time that these ancient sites were occupied. Some Apache traditions describe interactions with Ancestral Pueblo people during this time, but according to these stories, Puebloan people and Apache people were regarded as having separate identities. The White Mountain Apache Tribe of the Fort Apache Reservation, Arizona, does not claim cultural affiliation with the human remains and associated funerary objects from these five ancestral Upland Mogollon sites. As reported by Welch and Ferguson (2005), consultations between the White Mountain Apache Tribe of the Fort Apache Reservation, Arizona, and the Navajo Nation, Arizona, New Mexico & Utah; Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; and Pueblo of Laguna, New Mexico, have indicated that that none of these tribes wish to pursue claims of affiliation with sites on White Mountain Apache Tribal lands. Finally, the White Mountain Apache Tribe of the Fort Apache Reservation, Arizona, supports the repatriation of human remains and associated funerary objects from these five ancestral Upland Mogollon sites and is ready to assist the Hopi Tribe of Arizona and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico, in reburial on tribal land. Officials of the Bureau of Indian Affairs and Arizona State Museum have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of 77 individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of the Bureau of Indian Affairs and Arizona State Museum also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 180 objects described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains PO 00000 Frm 00045 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 52019 at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials of the Bureau of Indian Affairs and Arizona State Museum have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and the Hopi Tribe of Arizona and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary objects should contact John McClelland, NAGPRA Coordinator, Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, telephone (520) 626-2950, before September 23, 2010. Repatriation of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Hopi Tribe of Arizona and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico, may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The Arizona State Museum is responsible for notifying the Hopi Tribe of Arizona and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico, that this notice has been published. Dated: August 18, 2010. David Tarler, Acting Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2010–20946 Filed 8–23–10; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Colorado Museum, Boulder, CO National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects in the control of the University of Colorado Museum, Boulder, CO. The human remains were removed from Moffat County, CO. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. E:\FR\FM\24AUN1.SGM 24AUN1 wwoods2 on DSK1DXX6B1PROD with NOTICES_PART 1 52020 Federal Register / Vol. 75, No. 163 / Tuesday, August 24, 2010 / Notices A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the University of Colorado Museum professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Apache Tribe of Oklahoma; Bridgeport Paiute Indian Colony of California; Comanche Nation, Oklahoma; Confederated Tribes of the Goshute Reservation, Nevada and Utah; Death Valley Timbi-Sha Shoshone Band of California; Duckwater Shoshone Tribe of the Duckwater Reservation, Nevada; Ely Shoshone Tribe of Nevada; Fort McDermitt Paiute and Shoshone Tribes of the Fort McDermitt Indian Reservation, Nevada and Oregon; Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Kaibab Band of Paiute Indians of the Kaibab Indian Reservation, Arizona; Kiowa Indian Tribe of Oklahoma; Las Vegas Tribe of Paiute Indians of the Las Vegas Indian Colony, Nevada; Lovelock Paiute Tribe of the Lovelock Indian Colony, Nevada; Moapa Band of Paiute Indians of the Moapa River Indian Reservation, Nevada; Navajo Nation, Arizona, New Mexico & Utah; Northwestern Band of the Shoshoni Nation of Utah (Washakie); Paiute Indian Tribe of Utah (Cedar Band of Paiutes, Kanosh Band of Paiutes, Koosharem Band of Paiutes, and Shivwits Band of Paiutes); PaiuteShoshone Indians of the Bishop Community of the Bishop Colony, California; Paiute-Shoshone Tribe of the Fallon Reservation and Colony, Nevada; Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe of the Pyramid Lake Reservation, Nevada; Reno-Sparks Indian Colony, Nevada; San Juan Southern Paiute Tribe of Arizona; Shoshone Tribe of the Wind River Reservation, Wyoming; ShoshoneBannock Tribes of the Fort Hall Reservation of Idaho; Shoshone Paiute Tribes of the Duck Valley Reservation, Nevada; Skull Valley Band of Goshute Indians, Utah; Southern Ute Indian Tribe of the Southern Ute Reservation, Colorado; Summit Lake Paiute Tribe of Nevada; Susanville Indian Rancheria, California; Te-Moak Tribe of Western Shoshone Indians of Nevada (Four constituent bands: Battle Mountain Band; Elko Band; South Fork Band and Wells Band); Ute Indian Tribe of the Uintah & Ouray Reservation, Utah; Ute Mountain Tribe of the Ute Mountain Reservation, Colorado, New Mexico & Utah; Walker River Paiute Tribe of the Walker River Reservation, Nevada; Winnemucca Indian Colony of Nevada; Yerington Paiute Tribe of the Yerington Colony & Campbell Ranch, Nevada; Yomba Shoshone Tribe of the Yomba Reservation, Nevada; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico. Sometime from the late 1930s through the 1940s, human remains representing VerDate Mar<15>2010 15:00 Aug 23, 2010 Jkt 220001 one individual were removed from Yampa Canyon, Moffat County, CO, by Charlie Mantle. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1939 or 1940, human remains representing one individual were removed from Big Joe Draw, Yampa Canyon, Moffat County, CO, by Charlie Mantle. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In both situations described above, field crews from the University of Colorado Department of Anthropology and the University of Colorado Museum conducted legally permitted excavations throughout much of Yampa Canyon during the late 1930s and throughout the 1940s. The expeditions were directed by Robert F. Burgh, Earl H. Morris, and Charles Scoggin. Much of this work occurred either within or close to present-day Dinosaur National Monument. However, catalogue records suggest that the human remains were given to the excavators by Charlie Mantle, a private property owner. Mantle’s private land holdings were later added to Dinosaur National Monument. There is a clear gift agreement from Charlie Mantle to the museum. Based on biological evidence, Mr. Mantle’s apparent extensive knowledge of the Native American sites on his land and his collecting interests, and the interests of the excavators, the human remains are reasonably believed to be Native American. Officials of the University of Colorado Museum have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of two individuals of Native American ancestry. Lastly, officials of the University of Colorado Museum have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), a relationship of shared group identity cannot reasonably be traced between the Native American human remains and any present-day Indian tribe. The Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Review Committee (Review Committee) is responsible for recommending specific actions for disposition of culturally unidentifiable human remains. In October 2009, the University of Colorado Museum requested that the Review Committee recommend disposition of the culturally unidentifiable human remains to the Ute Mountain Tribe of the Ute Mountain Reservation, Colorado, New Mexico & Utah, based on Ute aboriginal land claims, supported by oral tradition, as well as the support of other Indian PO 00000 Frm 00046 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 tribes that were consulted. The Comanche Nation, Oklahoma; Hopi Tribe of Arizona; and Susanville Indian Rancheria, California, signed the disposition agreement in support of the disposition to the Ute Mountain Tribe. Furthermore, none of the Indian tribes consulted objected to the determination of the ‘‘culturally unidentifiable’’ status by the University of Colorado Museum and the disposition to the Ute Mountain Tribe of the Ute Mountain Reservation, Colorado, New Mexico & Utah. The Review Committee considered the proposal at its October 30–31, 2009, meeting and recommended the disposition of the human remains to the Ute Mountain Tribe of the Ute Mountain Reservation, Colorado, New Mexico & Utah. The Secretary of the Interior agreed with the Review Committee’s recommendation. An April 19, 2010, letter from the Designated Federal Officer, writing on behalf of the Secretary of the Interior, transmitted the authorization for the University of Colorado Museum to effect disposition of the physical remains of the culturally unidentifiable individuals to the Ute Mountain Tribe of the Ute Mountain Reservation, Colorado, New Mexico & Utah, contingent on the publication of a Notice of Inventory Completion in the Federal Register. This notice fulfills that requirement. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Steve Lekson, Curator of Anthropology, University of Colorado Museum, in care of Jan Bernstein, Bernstein & Associates, 1041 Lafayette St., Denver, CO 80218, telephone (303) 894–0648, before September 23, 2010. Disposition of the human remains to the Ute Mountain Tribe of the Ute Mountain Reservation, Colorado, New Mexico & Utah, may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The University of Colorado Museum is responsible for notifying the Apache Tribe of Oklahoma; Bridgeport Paiute Indian Colony of California; Comanche Nation, Oklahoma; Confederated Tribes of the Goshute Reservation, Nevada and Utah; Death Valley Timbi-Sha Shoshone Band of California; Duckwater Shoshone Tribe of the Duckwater Reservation, Nevada; Ely Shoshone Tribe of Nevada; Fort McDermitt Paiute and Shoshone Tribes of the Fort McDermitt Indian Reservation, Nevada and Oregon; Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Kaibab Band of Paiute Indians of the Kaibab Indian Reservation, Arizona; Kiowa Indian Tribe of Oklahoma; Las Vegas Tribe of Paiute Indians of the Las Vegas Indian Colony, Nevada; Lovelock Paiute Tribe of the Lovelock Indian Colony, Nevada; E:\FR\FM\24AUN1.SGM 24AUN1 Federal Register / Vol. 75, No. 163 / Tuesday, August 24, 2010 / Notices Moapa Band of Paiute Indians of the Moapa River Indian Reservation, Nevada; Navajo Nation, Arizona, New Mexico & Utah; Northwestern Band of the Shoshoni Nation of Utah (Washakie); Paiute Indian Tribe of Utah; Paiute-Shoshone Indians of the Bishop Community of the Bishop Colony, California; Paiute-Shoshone Tribe of the Fallon Reservation and Colony, Nevada; Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe of the Pyramid Lake Reservation, Nevada; Reno-Sparks Indian Colony, Nevada; San Juan Southern Paiute Tribe of Arizona; Shoshone Tribe of the Wind River Reservation, Wyoming; ShoshoneBannock Tribes of the Fort Hall Reservation of Idaho; Shoshone Paiute Tribes of the Duck Valley Reservation, Nevada; Skull Valley Band of Goshute Indians, Utah; Southern Ute Indian Tribe of the Southern Ute Reservation, Colorado; Summit Lake Paiute Tribe of Nevada; Susanville Indian Rancheria, California; Te-Moak Tribe of Western Shoshone Indians of Nevada; Ute Indian Tribe of the Uintah & Ouray Reservation, Utah; Ute Mountain Tribe of the Ute Mountain Reservation, Colorado, New Mexico & Utah; Walker River Paiute Tribe of the Walker River Reservation, Nevada; Winnemucca Indian Colony of Nevada; Yerington Paiute Tribe of the Yerington Colony & Campbell Ranch, Nevada; Yomba Shoshone Tribe of the Yomba Reservation, Nevada; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico, that this notice has been published. Dated: August 18, 2010. David Tarler, Acting Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2010–20954 Filed 8–23–10; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: New York University College of Dentistry, New York, NY National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: wwoods2 on DSK1DXX6B1PROD with NOTICES_PART 1 ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains in the possession of the New York University College of Dentistry, New York, NY. The human remains were removed from Port Clarence, Nome County, AK. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative VerDate Mar<15>2010 15:00 Aug 23, 2010 Jkt 220001 responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by New York University College of Dentistry professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Native Village of Brevig Mission and Native Village of Teller. At an unknown date, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were removed from an unidentified site at Port Clarence, Nome County, AK, by an unknown individual. By 1924, the human remains were donated to the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation by Mrs. George Heye. In 1956, the human remains were transferred to Dr. Theodore Kazamiroff, New York University College of Dentistry (NYUCD #334). No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Museum of the American Indian records list the origin of the human remains as Port Clarence, AK, which is located on the Seward Peninsula. The morphology of the human remains is consistent with Native American ancestry. In the late 19th century, Edward William Nelson, Smithsonian Institution naturalist, observed burials in the region. The human remains were placed in wooden boxes that were elevated onto poles. The boxes or poles were marked with totems to which tools or other necessary items were attached. The boxes were exposed and highly visible to collectors. Based on the preservation observed in excavations on the Seward Peninsula, it is likely that the human remains are associated with the Western Thule tradition, and postdate A.D. 1000. In the Western Thule tradition, the people of the Seward Peninsula were highly localized, with differences in their lifeways based on the particular resources available in their territory. Localization may have occurred alongside the development of geopolitical boundaries. Port Clarence was focused on whaling, and was part of the Sinrarmiut or Port Clarence territory of Inupiaq speakers at the time of European contact. Today, the descendants of the people of Port Clarence are represented by the Native Villages of Brevig Mission and Teller. Both communities made seasonal use of Port Clarence in the 20th century, and tribal representatives have identified PO 00000 Frm 00047 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 52021 Port Clarence as part of their ancestral territory. Officials of New York University College of Dentistry have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of one individual of Native American ancestry. Officials of New York University College of Dentistry also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and the Native Village of Brevig Mission and Native Village of Teller. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Dr. Louis Terracio, New York University College of Dentistry, 345 East 24th St., New York, NY 10010, telephone (212) 998–9917, before September 23, 2010. Repatriation of the human remains to the Native Village of Brevig Mission and Native Village of Teller may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The New York University College of Dentistry is responsible for notifying the Native Village of Brevig Mission and Native Village of Teller that this notice has been published. Dated: August 18, 2010. David Tarler, Acting Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2010–20950 Filed 8–23–10; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: New York University College of Dentistry, New York, NY National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains in the possession of the New York University College of Dentistry, New York, NY. The human remains were removed from an unknown location. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native E:\FR\FM\24AUN1.SGM 24AUN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 75, Number 163 (Tuesday, August 24, 2010)]
[Notices]
[Pages 52019-52021]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2010-20954]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service


Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Colorado Museum, 
Boulder, CO

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

    Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves 
Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the 
completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary 
objects in the control of the University of Colorado Museum, Boulder, 
CO. The human remains were removed from Moffat County, CO.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The 
determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible 
for the determinations in this notice.

[[Page 52020]]

    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the 
University of Colorado Museum professional staff in consultation with 
representatives of the Apache Tribe of Oklahoma; Bridgeport Paiute 
Indian Colony of California; Comanche Nation, Oklahoma; Confederated 
Tribes of the Goshute Reservation, Nevada and Utah; Death Valley Timbi-
Sha Shoshone Band of California; Duckwater Shoshone Tribe of the 
Duckwater Reservation, Nevada; Ely Shoshone Tribe of Nevada; Fort 
McDermitt Paiute and Shoshone Tribes of the Fort McDermitt Indian 
Reservation, Nevada and Oregon; Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Kaibab Band of 
Paiute Indians of the Kaibab Indian Reservation, Arizona; Kiowa Indian 
Tribe of Oklahoma; Las Vegas Tribe of Paiute Indians of the Las Vegas 
Indian Colony, Nevada; Lovelock Paiute Tribe of the Lovelock Indian 
Colony, Nevada; Moapa Band of Paiute Indians of the Moapa River Indian 
Reservation, Nevada; Navajo Nation, Arizona, New Mexico & Utah; 
Northwestern Band of the Shoshoni Nation of Utah (Washakie); Paiute 
Indian Tribe of Utah (Cedar Band of Paiutes, Kanosh Band of Paiutes, 
Koosharem Band of Paiutes, and Shivwits Band of Paiutes); Paiute-
Shoshone Indians of the Bishop Community of the Bishop Colony, 
California; Paiute-Shoshone Tribe of the Fallon Reservation and Colony, 
Nevada; Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe of the Pyramid Lake Reservation, 
Nevada; Reno-Sparks Indian Colony, Nevada; San Juan Southern Paiute 
Tribe of Arizona; Shoshone Tribe of the Wind River Reservation, 
Wyoming; Shoshone-Bannock Tribes of the Fort Hall Reservation of Idaho; 
Shoshone Paiute Tribes of the Duck Valley Reservation, Nevada; Skull 
Valley Band of Goshute Indians, Utah; Southern Ute Indian Tribe of the 
Southern Ute Reservation, Colorado; Summit Lake Paiute Tribe of Nevada; 
Susanville Indian Rancheria, California; Te-Moak Tribe of Western 
Shoshone Indians of Nevada (Four constituent bands: Battle Mountain 
Band; Elko Band; South Fork Band and Wells Band); Ute Indian Tribe of 
the Uintah & Ouray Reservation, Utah; Ute Mountain Tribe of the Ute 
Mountain Reservation, Colorado, New Mexico & Utah; Walker River Paiute 
Tribe of the Walker River Reservation, Nevada; Winnemucca Indian Colony 
of Nevada; Yerington Paiute Tribe of the Yerington Colony & Campbell 
Ranch, Nevada; Yomba Shoshone Tribe of the Yomba Reservation, Nevada; 
and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico.
    Sometime from the late 1930s through the 1940s, human remains 
representing one individual were removed from Yampa Canyon, Moffat 
County, CO, by Charlie Mantle. No known individual was identified. No 
associated funerary objects are present.
    In 1939 or 1940, human remains representing one individual were 
removed from Big Joe Draw, Yampa Canyon, Moffat County, CO, by Charlie 
Mantle. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary 
objects are present.
    In both situations described above, field crews from the University 
of Colorado Department of Anthropology and the University of Colorado 
Museum conducted legally permitted excavations throughout much of Yampa 
Canyon during the late 1930s and throughout the 1940s. The expeditions 
were directed by Robert F. Burgh, Earl H. Morris, and Charles Scoggin. 
Much of this work occurred either within or close to present-day 
Dinosaur National Monument. However, catalogue records suggest that the 
human remains were given to the excavators by Charlie Mantle, a private 
property owner. Mantle's private land holdings were later added to 
Dinosaur National Monument. There is a clear gift agreement from 
Charlie Mantle to the museum. Based on biological evidence, Mr. 
Mantle's apparent extensive knowledge of the Native American sites on 
his land and his collecting interests, and the interests of the 
excavators, the human remains are reasonably believed to be Native 
American.
    Officials of the University of Colorado Museum have determined 
that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described above 
represent the physical remains of two individuals of Native American 
ancestry. Lastly, officials of the University of Colorado Museum have 
determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), a relationship of 
shared group identity cannot reasonably be traced between the Native 
American human remains and any present-day Indian tribe.
    The Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Review 
Committee (Review Committee) is responsible for recommending specific 
actions for disposition of culturally unidentifiable human remains. In 
October 2009, the University of Colorado Museum requested that the 
Review Committee recommend disposition of the culturally unidentifiable 
human remains to the Ute Mountain Tribe of the Ute Mountain 
Reservation, Colorado, New Mexico & Utah, based on Ute aboriginal land 
claims, supported by oral tradition, as well as the support of other 
Indian tribes that were consulted. The Comanche Nation, Oklahoma; Hopi 
Tribe of Arizona; and Susanville Indian Rancheria, California, signed 
the disposition agreement in support of the disposition to the Ute 
Mountain Tribe. Furthermore, none of the Indian tribes consulted 
objected to the determination of the ``culturally unidentifiable'' 
status by the University of Colorado Museum and the disposition to the 
Ute Mountain Tribe of the Ute Mountain Reservation, Colorado, New 
Mexico & Utah.
    The Review Committee considered the proposal at its October 30-31, 
2009, meeting and recommended the disposition of the human remains to 
the Ute Mountain Tribe of the Ute Mountain Reservation, Colorado, New 
Mexico & Utah. The Secretary of the Interior agreed with the Review 
Committee's recommendation. An April 19, 2010, letter from the 
Designated Federal Officer, writing on behalf of the Secretary of the 
Interior, transmitted the authorization for the University of Colorado 
Museum to effect disposition of the physical remains of the culturally 
unidentifiable individuals to the Ute Mountain Tribe of the Ute 
Mountain Reservation, Colorado, New Mexico & Utah, contingent on the 
publication of a Notice of Inventory Completion in the Federal 
Register. This notice fulfills that requirement.
    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Steve 
Lekson, Curator of Anthropology, University of Colorado Museum, in care 
of Jan Bernstein, Bernstein & Associates, 1041 Lafayette St., Denver, 
CO 80218, telephone (303) 894-0648, before September 23, 2010. 
Disposition of the human remains to the Ute Mountain Tribe of the Ute 
Mountain Reservation, Colorado, New Mexico & Utah, may proceed after 
that date if no additional claimants come forward.
    The University of Colorado Museum is responsible for notifying the 
Apache Tribe of Oklahoma; Bridgeport Paiute Indian Colony of 
California; Comanche Nation, Oklahoma; Confederated Tribes of the 
Goshute Reservation, Nevada and Utah; Death Valley Timbi-Sha Shoshone 
Band of California; Duckwater Shoshone Tribe of the Duckwater 
Reservation, Nevada; Ely Shoshone Tribe of Nevada; Fort McDermitt 
Paiute and Shoshone Tribes of the Fort McDermitt Indian Reservation, 
Nevada and Oregon; Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Kaibab Band of Paiute Indians 
of the Kaibab Indian Reservation, Arizona; Kiowa Indian Tribe of 
Oklahoma; Las Vegas Tribe of Paiute Indians of the Las Vegas Indian 
Colony, Nevada; Lovelock Paiute Tribe of the Lovelock Indian Colony, 
Nevada;

[[Page 52021]]

Moapa Band of Paiute Indians of the Moapa River Indian Reservation, 
Nevada; Navajo Nation, Arizona, New Mexico & Utah; Northwestern Band of 
the Shoshoni Nation of Utah (Washakie); Paiute Indian Tribe of Utah; 
Paiute-Shoshone Indians of the Bishop Community of the Bishop Colony, 
California; Paiute-Shoshone Tribe of the Fallon Reservation and Colony, 
Nevada; Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe of the Pyramid Lake Reservation, 
Nevada; Reno-Sparks Indian Colony, Nevada; San Juan Southern Paiute 
Tribe of Arizona; Shoshone Tribe of the Wind River Reservation, 
Wyoming; Shoshone-Bannock Tribes of the Fort Hall Reservation of Idaho; 
Shoshone Paiute Tribes of the Duck Valley Reservation, Nevada; Skull 
Valley Band of Goshute Indians, Utah; Southern Ute Indian Tribe of the 
Southern Ute Reservation, Colorado; Summit Lake Paiute Tribe of Nevada; 
Susanville Indian Rancheria, California; Te-Moak Tribe of Western 
Shoshone Indians of Nevada; Ute Indian Tribe of the Uintah & Ouray 
Reservation, Utah; Ute Mountain Tribe of the Ute Mountain Reservation, 
Colorado, New Mexico & Utah; Walker River Paiute Tribe of the Walker 
River Reservation, Nevada; Winnemucca Indian Colony of Nevada; 
Yerington Paiute Tribe of the Yerington Colony & Campbell Ranch, 
Nevada; Yomba Shoshone Tribe of the Yomba Reservation, Nevada; and Zuni 
Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico, that this notice has been 
published.

    Dated: August 18, 2010.
David Tarler,
Acting Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2010-20954 Filed 8-23-10; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-S