Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, 52023 [2010-20940]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 75, No. 163 / Tuesday, August 24, 2010 / Notices at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials of the Field Museum of Natural History have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and the associated funerary objects and the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary objects should contact Helen Robbins, Repatriation Director, Field Museum of Natural History, 1400 S. Lake Shore Dr., Chicago, IL 60605, telephone (312) 665– 7317, before September 23, 2010. Repatriation of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon, may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The Field Museum is responsible for notifying the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, Washington; Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon; Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon; Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Washington; and the Nez Perce Tribe, Idaho, that this notice has been published. Dated: August 18, 2010. David Tarler, Acting Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2010–20948 Filed 8–23–10; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of Washington, Seattle, WA National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: wwoods2 on DSK1DXX6B1PROD with NOTICES_PART 1 ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains in the possession of the Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum (Burke Museum), University of Washington, Seattle, WA. The human remains were removed from the vicinity of Salem, Marion County, OR. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative VerDate Mar<15>2010 15:00 Aug 23, 2010 Jkt 220001 responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Burke Museum professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde Community of Oregon and the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. At an unknown date prior to 1930, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were removed from the vicinity of Salem, in Marion County, OR. These human remains were acquired by the Burke Museum through an exchange in 1930 (Burke Museum Accn. #2391). No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. The human remains are determined to be consistent with Native American morphology, as evidenced through cranial deformation and presence of wormian bones. Information available in the original accession files helped affirm the determination. Historical documentation indicates that the Willamette Valley area surrounding Salem, OR, was occupied by the Kalapuyan speaking people (Ruby and Brown 1986, Swanton 1952, and Zenk 1990). The Northern subdivision, the Yamhill, and the Central subdivision, the Sanitiam, were the primary aboriginal occupants in the vicinity of Salem. By the terms of the Kalapuya Treaty of 1855, the Kalapuyan people were moved to the Grand Ronde Reservation (Ruby and Brown 1986). Descendents of the Kalapuyan speaking people are now represented by the Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde Community of Oregon. The Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde Community of Oregon include at least 26 tribes and bands whose ancestral homelands span across western Oregon, southwestern Washington, and northern California. The Grand Ronde tribes and bands include the Rogue River, Umpqua, Chasta, Kalapuya, Molala, Clackamas, Salmon River, Tillamook, and Nestucca, as well as many other groups. At the time of contact, the various tribal groups spoke approximately 30 dialects of the Athabascan, Chinookan, Kalapuyan, Takelman, Molalan, Sahaptin, Salishan, and Shastan language families. In 1855, the U.S. Government forcibly relocated the Grand Ronde peoples to the Grand Ronde Reservation at the headwaters of PO 00000 Frm 00049 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 52023 the South Yamhill River in Yamhill and Polk Counties, OR. Officials of the Burke Museum have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of one individual of Native American ancestry. Officials of the Burke Museum also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and the Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde Community of Oregon. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Dr. Peter Lape, Burke Museum, University of Washington, Box 353010, Seattle, WA 98195, telephone (206) 685–3849, before September 23, 2010. Repatriation of the human remains to the Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde Community of Oregon may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The Burke Museum is responsible for notifying the Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde Community of Oregon and the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon that this notice has been published. Dated: August 18, 2010. David Tarler, Acting Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2010–20940 Filed 8–23–10; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area Advisory Council; Notice of Public Meeting Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area. ACTION: Notice of meeting. AGENCY: Notice is hereby given that a meeting of the Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area Advisory Council will be held on Wednesday, September 15, 2010, at 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the Independence Wharf, 470 Atlantic Avenue, Community Room, Boston, MA. The agenda will include a scoping session about a park pet policy, a brainstorming session for a 2016 celebration, and an update on the community outreach project, a park update, and public comment. The meeting will be open to the public. Any person may file with the Superintendent SUMMARY: E:\FR\FM\24AUN1.SGM 24AUN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 75, Number 163 (Tuesday, August 24, 2010)]
[Notices]
[Page 52023]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2010-20940]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service


Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington 
State Museum, University of Washington, Seattle, WA

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

    Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves 
Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the 
completion of an inventory of human remains in the possession of the 
Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum (Burke Museum), 
University of Washington, Seattle, WA. The human remains were removed 
from the vicinity of Salem, Marion County, OR.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The 
determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible 
for the determinations in this notice.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Burke 
Museum professional staff in consultation with representatives of the 
Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde Community of Oregon and the 
Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon.
    At an unknown date prior to 1930, human remains representing a 
minimum of one individual were removed from the vicinity of Salem, in 
Marion County, OR. These human remains were acquired by the Burke 
Museum through an exchange in 1930 (Burke Museum Accn. 2391). 
No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    The human remains are determined to be consistent with Native 
American morphology, as evidenced through cranial deformation and 
presence of wormian bones. Information available in the original 
accession files helped affirm the determination.
    Historical documentation indicates that the Willamette Valley area 
surrounding Salem, OR, was occupied by the Kalapuyan speaking people 
(Ruby and Brown 1986, Swanton 1952, and Zenk 1990). The Northern 
subdivision, the Yamhill, and the Central subdivision, the Sanitiam, 
were the primary aboriginal occupants in the vicinity of Salem. By the 
terms of the Kalapuya Treaty of 1855, the Kalapuyan people were moved 
to the Grand Ronde Reservation (Ruby and Brown 1986). Descendents of 
the Kalapuyan speaking people are now represented by the Confederated 
Tribes of the Grand Ronde Community of Oregon.
    The Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde Community of Oregon 
include at least 26 tribes and bands whose ancestral homelands span 
across western Oregon, southwestern Washington, and northern 
California. The Grand Ronde tribes and bands include the Rogue River, 
Umpqua, Chasta, Kalapuya, Molala, Clackamas, Salmon River, Tillamook, 
and Nestucca, as well as many other groups. At the time of contact, the 
various tribal groups spoke approximately 30 dialects of the 
Athabascan, Chinookan, Kalapuyan, Takelman, Molalan, Sahaptin, 
Salishan, and Shastan language families. In 1855, the U.S. Government 
forcibly relocated the Grand Ronde peoples to the Grand Ronde 
Reservation at the headwaters of the South Yamhill River in Yamhill and 
Polk Counties, OR.
    Officials of the Burke Museum have determined that, pursuant to 25 
U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described above represent the 
physical remains of one individual of Native American ancestry. 
Officials of the Burke Museum also have determined that, pursuant to 25 
U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that 
can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and 
the Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde Community of Oregon.
    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Dr. 
Peter Lape, Burke Museum, University of Washington, Box 353010, 
Seattle, WA 98195, telephone (206) 685-3849, before September 23, 2010. 
Repatriation of the human remains to the Confederated Tribes of the 
Grand Ronde Community of Oregon may proceed after that date if no 
additional claimants come forward.
    The Burke Museum is responsible for notifying the Confederated 
Tribes of the Grand Ronde Community of Oregon and the Confederated 
Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon that this notice has 
been published.

    Dated: August 18, 2010.
David Tarler,
Acting Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2010-20940 Filed 8-23-10; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-S