Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Recovery Plan for the Prairie Species of Western Oregon and Southwestern Washington, 37460-37461 [2010-15766]

Download as PDF 37460 Federal Register / Vol. 75, No. 124 / Tuesday, June 29, 2010 / Notices Alaska Oregon/Washington Alaska RAC Eastern Washington RAC; John DaySnake RAC; Southeast Oregon RAC Pam Robbins, Oregon State Office, BLM, 333 SW First Avenue, P.O. Box 2965, Portland, Oregon 97204, (503) 808–6306. Ruth McCoard, Alaska State Office, BLM, 222 West 7th Avenue, #13, Anchorage, Alaska 99513, (970) 271– 3322; Alternate: Pam Eldridge, (970) 271– 5555. Arizona Arizona RAC Deborah Stevens, Arizona State Office, BLM, One North Central Avenue, Suite 800, Phoenix, Arizona 85004, (602) 417–9215. California Central California RAC Utah Utah RAC Sherry Foot, Utah State Office, BLM, 440 West 200 South, Suite 500, P.O. Box 45155, Salt Lake City, Utah 84101, (801) 539–4195. Certification Statement: I hereby certify that the BLM Resource Advisory Councils are necessary and in the public interest in connection with the Secretary’s responsibilities to manage the lands, resources, and facilities administered by the BLM. David Christy, Mother Lode Field Office, BLM, 5152 Hillsdale Circle, El Dorado Hills, California 95762, (916) 941–3146. Robert V. Abbey, Director. Northeastern California RAC [FR Doc. 2010–15775 Filed 6–28–10; 8:45 am] Jeff Fontana, Eagle Lake Field Office, BLM, 2950 Riverside Drive, Susanville, California 96130, (530) 252–5332. BILLING CODE 4310–84–P Northwestern California RAC Fish and Wildlife Service Jeff Fontana, Eagle Lake Field Office, BLM, 2950 Riverside Drive, Susanville, California 96130, (530) 252–5332. Idaho Boise District RAC MJ Byrne, Boise District Office, BLM, 3948 Development Avenue, Boise, Idaho 83705, (208) 384–3393. Twin Falls District RAC Heather Tiel-Nelson, Twin Falls District Office, BLM, 2536 Kimberly Road, Twin Falls, Idaho 83301, (208) 736–2352. Dakotas RAC Lonny Bagley, North Dakota Field Office, BLM, 99 23rd Avenue West, Suite A, Dickinson, North Dakota 58601, (701) 227–7703. emcdonald on DSK2BSOYB1PROD with NOTICES4 Eastern Montana RAC Mark Jacobsen, Miles City Field Office, BLM, 111 Garryowen Road, Miles City, Montana 59301, (406) 233– 2800. Nevada Sierra-Front Northwestern Great Basin RAC Rochelle Francisco, Nevada State Office, BLM, 1340 Financial Boulevard, Reno, Nevada 89502, (775) 861–6588. 19:55 Jun 28, 2010 Jkt 220001 [FWS–R1–ES–2010–N072; 10120–1113– 0000–C2] Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Recovery Plan for the Prairie Species of Western Oregon and Southwestern Washington AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of document availability. We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, announce the availability of the approved Recovery Plan for the Prairie Species of Western Oregon and Southwestern Washington. The recovery plan addresses three endangered and three threatened species. This plan includes recovery objectives and criteria, and specific recovery actions necessary to achieve downlisting and delisting of the species, and their removal from the Federal List of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants. The plan also supplements the existing recovery plan for one threatened species, providing recommendations for reintroducing it to its historical range. ADDRESSES: An electronic copy of the recovery plan is available at https:// endangered.fws.gov/recovery/ index.html#plans. Copies of the recovery plan are also available by request from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Oregon Fish and Wildlife SUMMARY: Montana and Dakotas VerDate Mar<15>2010 DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PO 00000 Frm 00086 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Office, 2600 SE 98th Avenue, Suite 100, Portland, OR 97266 (phone: 503–231– 6179). Printed copies of the recovery plan will be available for distribution within 4 to 6 weeks. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Cat Brown, Fish and Wildlife Biologist, at the above Portland address and telephone number. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: We announce the availability of the approved Recovery Plan (plan) for the Prairie Species of Western Oregon and Southwestern Washington. The plan addresses three endangered and three threatened species, and includes recovery objectives and criteria, and specific recovery actions necessary to achieve downlisting and delisting of the species and their removal from the Federal List of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants. The plan also supplements the existing recovery plan for one of the included threatened species, Castilleja levisecta, providing recommendations for reintroducing it to its historical range in the Willamette Valley. The recovery plan addresses the following three species listed as endangered: Fender’s blue butterfly (Icaricia icairoides fenderi), Erigeron decumbens var. decumbens (Willamette daisy), and Lomatium bradshawii (Bradshaw’s lomatium). The plan addresses the following three threatened species: Lupinus sulphureus ssp. kincaidii (Kincaid’s lupine), Sidalcea nelsoniana (Nelson’s checker-mallow), and Castilleja levisecta (golden paintbrush). Background Recovery of endangered or threatened animals and plants is the primary goal of the Endangered Species Act (Act) (16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq.) and our endangered species program. Recovery means improvement of the status of listed species to the point at which listing is no longer required under the criteria set out in section 4(a)(1) of the Act and its implementing regulations at 50 CFR 424. Recovery plans describe actions considered necessary for the conservation of listed species, establish criteria for downlisting or delisting species, and estimate time and cost for implementing the measures needed for recovery. The Act requires the development of recovery plans for endangered or threatened species unless such a plan would not promote the conservation of the species. Section 4(f) of the Act requires public notice, and an opportunity for public review and comment, during recovery plan E:\FR\FM\29JNN1.SGM 29JNN1 emcdonald on DSK2BSOYB1PROD with NOTICES4 Federal Register / Vol. 75, No. 124 / Tuesday, June 29, 2010 / Notices development. From September 22, 2008, through December 22, 2008, we provided the draft Recovery Plan for the Prairie Species of Western Oregon and Southwestern Washington to the public and solicited comments (see Federal Register notices 73 FR 54603 of September 22, 2008, and 73 FR 58975 of October 8, 2008). We considered information we received during the public comment period and comments from peer reviewers in our preparation of the recovery plan, and have summarized that information in Appendix F of the approved recovery plan. We welcome continuing public comment on this recovery plan, and we will consider all substantive comments on an ongoing basis to inform the implementation of recovery activities and future updates to the recovery plan. The native prairies of western Oregon and southwestern Washington are among the most imperiled ecosystems in the United States. Six native prairie species in the region—one butterfly and five plants—have been added to the Federal List of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants since 1988. In this recovery plan, we elucidate our recovery strategies and objectives for Fender’s blue butterfly (Icaricia icairoides fenderi), Erigeron decumbens var. decumbens (Willamette daisy), Lomatium bradshawii (Bradshaw’s lomatium), Lupinus sulphureus ssp. kincaidii (Kincaid’s lupine), Sidalcea nelsoniana (Nelson’s checker-mallow), and Castilleja levisecta (golden paintbrush). This plan replaces and supersedes previously approved recovery plans for Lomatium bradshawii and Sidalcea nelsoniana. It also augments, but does not replace, the existing recovery plan for Castilleja levisecta: this new Prairie Species Recovery Plan provides recommendations for the reintroduction of Castilleja levisecta into its historical range in the Willamette Valley, consistent with this species’ published recovery plan. In addition to recovery strategies for the six listed species, the plan recommends conservation strategies for one candidate species, Taylor’s checkerspot butterfly (Euphydryas editha taylori), and six plant species of concern: Delphinium leucophaeum (pale larkspur), Delphinium oreganum (Willamette Valley larkspur), Delphinium pavonaceum (peacock larkspur), Horkelia congesta ssp. congesta (shaggy horkelia), Sericocarpus rigidus (whitetopped aster), and Sisyrinchium hitchcockii (Hitchcock’s blue-eyed grass). All of the species addressed in this recovery plan are threatened by the VerDate Mar<15>2010 19:55 Jun 28, 2010 Jkt 220001 continued degradation, loss, and fragmentation of their native prairie ecosystems. We developed the draft recovery plan in coordination with the Western Oregon and Southwestern Washington Prairie Species Recovery Team, which includes representatives from two Department of the Interior bureaus (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Bureau of Land Management), two State agencies (Washington Department of Natural Resources and Oregon Department of Transportation), the Confederated Tribes of the Grande Ronde Community of Oregon, Washington State University, and the academic and private sectors. Our recovery strategy for the species addressed in this recovery plan is to protect remaining fragments of upland and wet prairie habitats and to restore them to fully functioning prairie ecosystems. The recovery plan calls for viable populations of the listed prairie species to be protected in a series of recovery zones distributed across their historical ranges. Recovery actions will include habitat management, restoration of historical disturbance regimes, control of noxious nonnative plants, carefully planned reintroductions, population monitoring, active research, and public involvement and outreach. The recovery actions are designed to ameliorate threats and increase population sizes of Fender’s blue butterfly, Lupinus sulphureus ssp. kincaidii, Erigeron decumbens var. decumbens, Lomatium bradshawii, Sidalcea nelsoniana, and Castilleja levisecta to achieve recovery goals, which, if successful, will allow their eventual delisting (removal from the List of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants). The widespread loss and degradation of prairie habitats in western Oregon and southwestern Washington have been responsible for the decline of many other plant and animal species associated with these communities. We believe that a holistic ecosystemmanagement approach to the restoration of prairie habitats will not only contribute to the recovery of the listed prairie species, but that such management will also contribute to the protection of populations of the associated prairie species of concern discussed in this plan, as well as other native prairie species. Authority: The authority for this action is section 4(f) of the Endangered Species Act, 16 U.S.C. 1533 (f). PO 00000 Frm 00087 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 37461 Dated: June 7, 2010. Carolyn A. Bohan, Acting Regional Director, Region 1, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. [FR Doc. 2010–15766 Filed 6–28–10; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4310–55–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management [LLORP00000.L10200000.PI0000; HAG10– 0304] Notice of Public Meeting, John Day/ Snake Resource Advisory Council AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Meeting notice for the John Day/ Snake Resource Advisory Council. SUMMARY: Pursuant to the Federal Land Policy and Management Act and the Federal Advisory Committee Act, the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM) John DaySnake Resource Advisory Council (JDSRAC) will meet as indicated below: DATES: The JDSRAC meeting will begin at 8 a.m. Pacific Daylight Time on July 20, 2010. ADDRESSES: The JDSRAC will meet at the Malheur National Forest Headquarters located on 431 Patterson Road, John Day, OR 97845–0909. For a copy of material to be discussed or the conference call number, please contact the BLM, Prineville District; information below. The JDSRAC will conduct a public meeting to discuss several topics, including the John Day Basin Resource Management Plan Alternatives for Grazing Decisions, Council response to the Blue Mountain Forest Plan Revision, the response to the Wild Horse & Burro Strategy presently open to public comment, and the North End Umatilla Sheep Plan. There will also be a presentation about collaborative management practices with The Nature Conservancy. Public comment is scheduled from 1 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. (Pacific Daylight Time) July 20, 2010. For a copy of the information distributed to the JDSRAC members, please contact BLM Prineville District Office by telephone at (541) 416–6700 or at the address listed below. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Christina Lilienthal, Public Affairs Specialist, 3050 NE Third, Prineville, E:\FR\FM\29JNN1.SGM 29JNN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 75, Number 124 (Tuesday, June 29, 2010)]
[Notices]
[Pages 37460-37461]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2010-15766]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

Fish and Wildlife Service

[FWS-R1-ES-2010-N072; 10120-1113-0000-C2]


Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Recovery Plan for 
the Prairie Species of Western Oregon and Southwestern Washington

AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice of document availability.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, announce the 
availability of the approved Recovery Plan for the Prairie Species of 
Western Oregon and Southwestern Washington. The recovery plan addresses 
three endangered and three threatened species. This plan includes 
recovery objectives and criteria, and specific recovery actions 
necessary to achieve downlisting and delisting of the species, and 
their removal from the Federal List of Endangered and Threatened 
Wildlife and Plants. The plan also supplements the existing recovery 
plan for one threatened species, providing recommendations for 
reintroducing it to its historical range.

ADDRESSES: An electronic copy of the recovery plan is available at 
https://endangered.fws.gov/recovery/#plans. Copies of the 
recovery plan are also available by request from the U.S. Fish and 
Wildlife Service, Oregon Fish and Wildlife Office, 2600 SE 98th Avenue, 
Suite 100, Portland, OR 97266 (phone: 503-231-6179). Printed copies of 
the recovery plan will be available for distribution within 4 to 6 
weeks.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Cat Brown, Fish and Wildlife 
Biologist, at the above Portland address and telephone number.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: We announce the availability of the approved 
Recovery Plan (plan) for the Prairie Species of Western Oregon and 
Southwestern Washington. The plan addresses three endangered and three 
threatened species, and includes recovery objectives and criteria, and 
specific recovery actions necessary to achieve downlisting and 
delisting of the species and their removal from the Federal List of 
Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants. The plan also 
supplements the existing recovery plan for one of the included 
threatened species, Castilleja levisecta, providing recommendations for 
reintroducing it to its historical range in the Willamette Valley.
    The recovery plan addresses the following three species listed as 
endangered: Fender's blue butterfly (Icaricia icairoides fenderi), 
Erigeron decumbens var. decumbens (Willamette daisy), and Lomatium 
bradshawii (Bradshaw's lomatium). The plan addresses the following 
three threatened species: Lupinus sulphureus ssp. kincaidii (Kincaid's 
lupine), Sidalcea nelsoniana (Nelson's checker-mallow), and Castilleja 
levisecta (golden paintbrush).

Background

    Recovery of endangered or threatened animals and plants is the 
primary goal of the Endangered Species Act (Act) (16 U.S.C. 1531 et 
seq.) and our endangered species program. Recovery means improvement of 
the status of listed species to the point at which listing is no longer 
required under the criteria set out in section 4(a)(1) of the Act and 
its implementing regulations at 50 CFR 424. Recovery plans describe 
actions considered necessary for the conservation of listed species, 
establish criteria for downlisting or delisting species, and estimate 
time and cost for implementing the measures needed for recovery.
    The Act requires the development of recovery plans for endangered 
or threatened species unless such a plan would not promote the 
conservation of the species. Section 4(f) of the Act requires public 
notice, and an opportunity for public review and comment, during 
recovery plan

[[Page 37461]]

development. From September 22, 2008, through December 22, 2008, we 
provided the draft Recovery Plan for the Prairie Species of Western 
Oregon and Southwestern Washington to the public and solicited comments 
(see Federal Register notices 73 FR 54603 of September 22, 2008, and 73 
FR 58975 of October 8, 2008). We considered information we received 
during the public comment period and comments from peer reviewers in 
our preparation of the recovery plan, and have summarized that 
information in Appendix F of the approved recovery plan. We welcome 
continuing public comment on this recovery plan, and we will consider 
all substantive comments on an ongoing basis to inform the 
implementation of recovery activities and future updates to the 
recovery plan.
    The native prairies of western Oregon and southwestern Washington 
are among the most imperiled ecosystems in the United States. Six 
native prairie species in the region--one butterfly and five plants--
have been added to the Federal List of Endangered and Threatened 
Wildlife and Plants since 1988. In this recovery plan, we elucidate our 
recovery strategies and objectives for Fender's blue butterfly 
(Icaricia icairoides fenderi), Erigeron decumbens var. decumbens 
(Willamette daisy), Lomatium bradshawii (Bradshaw's lomatium), Lupinus 
sulphureus ssp. kincaidii (Kincaid's lupine), Sidalcea nelsoniana 
(Nelson's checker-mallow), and Castilleja levisecta (golden 
paintbrush). This plan replaces and supersedes previously approved 
recovery plans for Lomatium bradshawii and Sidalcea nelsoniana. It also 
augments, but does not replace, the existing recovery plan for 
Castilleja levisecta: this new Prairie Species Recovery Plan provides 
recommendations for the reintroduction of Castilleja levisecta into its 
historical range in the Willamette Valley, consistent with this 
species' published recovery plan. In addition to recovery strategies 
for the six listed species, the plan recommends conservation strategies 
for one candidate species, Taylor's checkerspot butterfly (Euphydryas 
editha taylori), and six plant species of concern: Delphinium 
leucophaeum (pale larkspur), Delphinium oreganum (Willamette Valley 
larkspur), Delphinium pavonaceum (peacock larkspur), Horkelia congesta 
ssp. congesta (shaggy horkelia), Sericocarpus rigidus (white-topped 
aster), and Sisyrinchium hitchcockii (Hitchcock's blue-eyed grass). All 
of the species addressed in this recovery plan are threatened by the 
continued degradation, loss, and fragmentation of their native prairie 
ecosystems.
    We developed the draft recovery plan in coordination with the 
Western Oregon and Southwestern Washington Prairie Species Recovery 
Team, which includes representatives from two Department of the 
Interior bureaus (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Bureau of Land 
Management), two State agencies (Washington Department of Natural 
Resources and Oregon Department of Transportation), the Confederated 
Tribes of the Grande Ronde Community of Oregon, Washington State 
University, and the academic and private sectors.
    Our recovery strategy for the species addressed in this recovery 
plan is to protect remaining fragments of upland and wet prairie 
habitats and to restore them to fully functioning prairie ecosystems. 
The recovery plan calls for viable populations of the listed prairie 
species to be protected in a series of recovery zones distributed 
across their historical ranges. Recovery actions will include habitat 
management, restoration of historical disturbance regimes, control of 
noxious nonnative plants, carefully planned reintroductions, population 
monitoring, active research, and public involvement and outreach. The 
recovery actions are designed to ameliorate threats and increase 
population sizes of Fender's blue butterfly, Lupinus sulphureus ssp. 
kincaidii, Erigeron decumbens var. decumbens, Lomatium bradshawii, 
Sidalcea nelsoniana, and Castilleja levisecta to achieve recovery 
goals, which, if successful, will allow their eventual delisting 
(removal from the List of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and 
Plants).
    The widespread loss and degradation of prairie habitats in western 
Oregon and southwestern Washington have been responsible for the 
decline of many other plant and animal species associated with these 
communities. We believe that a holistic ecosystem-management approach 
to the restoration of prairie habitats will not only contribute to the 
recovery of the listed prairie species, but that such management will 
also contribute to the protection of populations of the associated 
prairie species of concern discussed in this plan, as well as other 
native prairie species.

    Authority: The authority for this action is section 4(f) of the 
Endangered Species Act, 16 U.S.C. 1533 (f).

    Dated: June 7, 2010.
Carolyn A. Bohan,
Acting Regional Director, Region 1, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
[FR Doc. 2010-15766 Filed 6-28-10; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4310-55-P