Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, 36672-36673 [2010-15595]

Download as PDF jlentini on DSKJ8SOYB1PROD with NOTICES 36672 Federal Register / Vol. 75, No. 123 / Monday, June 28, 2010 / Notices A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Western Michigan University professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Little River Band of Ottawa Indians, Michigan, and the Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, Michigan. In 1984, human remains representing a minimum of two individuals were removed from the Front and Leonard Street intersection, Kent County, MI, during the excavation of a building foundation. George Davis, then president of the Wright L. Coffinberry Chapter of the Michigan Archaeological Society, recovered as much of the material as possible after they had tumbled from the shovel of the tractor during the construction. It is not clear how or why they were transferred to Western Michigan University. No known individuals were identified. The five associated funerary objects are three turtle shell fragments, a badly rusted nail, and a kaolin pipe stem fragment. The human remains were determined to be of Native American ancestry based on skeletal and dental morphology. The determination of an early 19th century date is based on typology of the kaolin pipe and the close proximity of these remains to a known 19th century Ottawa settlement, Noondays Village (20KT114). Consequently, the preponderance of osteological, historical, and consultation evidence connects the remains found at Front Avenue and Leonard Street to the Little River Band of Ottawa Indians, Michigan. In 1990, human remains representing a minimum of six individuals were removed from Riverside Drive, Lowell, Kent County, MI. The remains were uncovered during installation of a fire hydrant and water main. Upon discovery, Dr. Robert Sundick was called to the site to conduct an excavation of the remains. After completion, the remains were sent with Sundick to Western Michigan University for curation and analysis. The 68 associated funerary objects are 1 leather garment fragment decorated with small round cuprous brooches, 1 decorative cuprous item (possible ear wheel fragment), 3 cuprous Saturnshaped bells, 8 wrought iron nails with remnants of wood which may be remains of a coffin, 53 glass beads (representing 27 black glass tubular beads and 26 purple glass seed beads), 1 small bag of very fragmented faunal remains, and 1 pottery sherd. The human remains were determined to be of Native American ancestry based on skeletal and dental morphology. They were dated to the early 19th century based on analysis of the VerDate Mar<15>2010 21:02 Jun 25, 2010 Jkt 220001 garment fragment, the presence of glass trade beads, and typology of the other associated funerary objects. The Little River Band of Ottawa Indians, Michigan, are well-documented as occupying the Grand River Valley since at least the 17th century. All of the human remains and associated funerary objects described above from the Kent County sites are, by a preponderance of the evidence, culturally affiliated with the Little River Band of Ottawa Indians, Michigan, whose ancestors include the Grand River Ottawa Bands. Officials of Western Michigan University have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of eight individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of Western Michigan University also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(3)(A), the 73 objects described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials of Western Michigan University have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and the Little River Bands of Ottawa Indians, Michigan. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary objects should contact LouAnn Wurst, Department of Anthropology, Western Michigan University, 1005 Moore Hall, Kalamazoo, MI 49008, telephone (269) 387–2753, before July 28, 2010. Repatriation of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Little River Band of Ottawa Indians, Michigan, may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. Western Michigan University is responsible for notifying the Little River Band of Ottawa Indians, Michigan, and the Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, Michigan, that this notice has been published. Dated: June 22, 2010 Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2010–15577 Filed 6–25–10; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S PO 00000 Frm 00044 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of Washington, Seattle, WA National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains in the possession of the Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum (Burke Museum), University of Washington, Seattle, WA. The human remains were removed from Lopez Island, San Juan County, WA. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Burke Museum professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Lummi Tribe of the Lummi Reservation, Washington; Samish Indian Tribe, Washington; and Swinomish Indians of the Swinomish Reservation, Washington. In 1949, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were removed from site 45–SJ–186, Lopez Island, San Juan County, WA. The remains were excavated by a University of Washington field school under the supervision of Mr. Carroll Burroughs, and transferred to the Burke Museum in 1951 (Burke Accn. #3649). In 2010, the human remains were found in a level bag at the museum. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Historical documentation indicates that the southern Lopez Island area is part of the Samish aboriginal territory (Suttles (1951 and 1990), Smith (1941), Roberts (1975), and Tremaine (1975)). The Treaty of Point Elliot in 1855 stated that the Samish were to be relocated to the Lummi Reservation. After the Treaty of Point Elliot, many Samish individuals relocated to either the Lummi Reservation or the Swinomish Reservation (Ruby and Brown 1986:179). Many Samish, however, chose to remain in their old village sites. E:\FR\FM\28JNN1.SGM 28JNN1 Federal Register / Vol. 75, No. 123 / Monday, June 28, 2010 / Notices Officials of the Burke Museum have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains listed above represent the physical remains of at least one individual of Native American ancestry. Officials of the Burke Museum also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and the Lummi Tribe of the Lummi Reservation, Washington; Samish Indian Tribe, Washington; and Swinomish Indians of the Swinomish Reservation, Washington. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Dr. Peter Lape, Burke Museum, University of Washington, Box 353010, Seattle, WA 98195, telephone (206) 685–3849, before July 28, 2010. Repatriation of the human remains to the Lummi Tribe of the Lummi Reservation, Washington; Samish Indian Tribe, Washington; and Swinomish Indians of the Swinomish Reservation, Washington, may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The Burke Museum is responsible for notifying the Lummi Tribe of the Lummi Reservation, Washington; Samish Indian Tribe, Washington; and Swinomish Indians of the Swinomish Reservation, Washington, that this notice has been published. Dated: June 22, 2010 Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2010–15595 Filed 6–25–10; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Public Museum of West Michigan, Grand Rapids, MI National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: jlentini on DSKJ8SOYB1PROD with NOTICES ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects in the control of the Public Museum of West Michigan (Grand Rapids Public Museum), Grand Rapids, MI. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from Allegan, Berrien, Cass, Grand Traverse, VerDate Mar<15>2010 21:02 Jun 25, 2010 Jkt 220001 Kalamazoo, Kent, Montcalm, Ottawa, St. Joseph, and Wayne Counties, MI. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains and associated funerary objects was made by Public Museum of West Michigan officials in consultation with the Bay Mills Indian Community, Michigan; Citizen Potawatomi Nation, Oklahoma; Forest County Potawatomi Community, Wisconsin; Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians, Michigan; Hannahville Indian Community, Michigan; Keweenaw Bay Indian Community, Michigan; Lac Vieux Desert Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians, Michigan; Little River Band of Ottawa Indians, Michigan; Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, Michigan; Match-e-benash-she-wish Band of Pottawatomi Indians of Michigan; Nottawaseppi Huron Band of the Potawatomi, Michigan (formerly the Huron Potawatomi, Inc.); Ottawa Tribe of Oklahoma; Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians, Michigan and Indiana; Prairie Band of Potawatomi Nation, Kansas; Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians, Minnesota; Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan; Sac & Fox Nation, Oklahoma; and Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Michigan. In addition, the museum also consulted with the following nonfederally recognized Indian groups: Burt Lake Band of Ottawa & Chippewa and the Grand River Bands of Ottawa. In 1956, human remains representing a minimum of four individuals were removed from an unknown site near Saugatuck, Allegan County, MI. The human remains and associated funerary objects were excavated by the museum with the assistance of Dr. E.F. Greenman. No known individuals were identified. The 12 associated funerary objects are 5 shell beads, 1 flint spear, 2 lots of red ochre, 1 shell bracelet, 1 lot of bird bone, 1 flint flake, and 1 projectile point fragment. At an unknown date, human remains representing a minimum of three individuals were removed from an unknown site in Allegan County, MI. At an unknown date, the ‘‘Hibellink Estate’’ acquired the human remains. At an unknown date, Harvey Bouknegt acquired the human remains from the PO 00000 Frm 00045 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 36673 ‘‘Hibellink Estate.’’ At an unknown date, Ruth Herrick acquired the human remains from Harvey Bouknegt. In 1974, the museum acquired the human remains from Ruth Herrick through a bequest. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. At an unknown date, human remains representing a minimum of three individuals were removed from the Niles area, Berrien County, MI. In 1890– 1892, E.H. Crane acquired the human remains. In 1917, the museum purchased the human remains from the E.H. Crane estate. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1879, human remains representing a minimum of four individuals were removed from Walter Mounds 1 & 2 (20CS31), Cass County, MI. At an unknown date, E.H. Crane acquired the human remains and associated funerary objects. In 1917, the museum purchased the human remains and associated funerary objects from the E.H. Crane estate. No known individuals were identified. The 33 associated funerary objects are 1 Busycon shell dipper, 16 lots of bone awls and fragments, 1 grinding stone, 1 stone dish, 3 fired clay balls, 5 pottery shards, 1 boatstone, 1 drilled bear tooth, 2 lots of polished bone, 1 pottery vessel, and 1 lot of turtle carapace fragments. In 1879, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were removed from Merrit Mound 5 (20CS31), Cass County, MI. At an unknown date, E.H. Crane acquired the human remains and associated funerary objects. In 1917, the museum purchased the human remains and associated funerary objects from the E.H. Crane estate. No known individuals were identified. The 32 associated funerary objects are 2 pottery vessels, 1 polished sandstone fragment, 5 projectile points, 1 drilled talon, 1 lot of pottery shards, 8 individual pottery shards, 1 lot of mica fragments, 1 lot of flint flakes, 1 copper nugget, 1 vial of pyrite, 4 vials of sand, 2 vials of red ochre, 1 metal tin containing red ochre, 1 vial of lavender pigment, and 2 vials of yellow ochre. In 1879, human remains representing a minimum of two individuals were removed from Kibler Mound #12 (20CS6), Cass County, MI. At an unknown date, E.H. Crane acquired the human remains and associated funerary objects. In 1917, the museum purchased the human remains and associated funerary objects from the E.H. Crane estate. No known individuals were identified. The 27 associated funerary objects are 1 slate gorget, 1 lot of wood fragments, 1 lot of fired clay balls, 4 lots E:\FR\FM\28JNN1.SGM 28JNN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 75, Number 123 (Monday, June 28, 2010)]
[Notices]
[Pages 36672-36673]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2010-15595]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service


Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington 
State Museum, University of Washington, Seattle, WA

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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    Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves 
Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the 
completion of an inventory of human remains in the possession of the 
Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum (Burke Museum), 
University of Washington, Seattle, WA. The human remains were removed 
from Lopez Island, San Juan County, WA.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The 
determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible 
for the determinations in this notice.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Burke 
Museum professional staff in consultation with representatives of the 
Lummi Tribe of the Lummi Reservation, Washington; Samish Indian Tribe, 
Washington; and Swinomish Indians of the Swinomish Reservation, 
Washington.
    In 1949, human remains representing a minimum of one individual 
were removed from site 45-SJ-186, Lopez Island, San Juan County, WA. 
The remains were excavated by a University of Washington field school 
under the supervision of Mr. Carroll Burroughs, and transferred to the 
Burke Museum in 1951 (Burke Accn. 3649). In 2010, the human 
remains were found in a level bag at the museum. No known individual 
was identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    Historical documentation indicates that the southern Lopez Island 
area is part of the Samish aboriginal territory (Suttles (1951 and 
1990), Smith (1941), Roberts (1975), and Tremaine (1975)). The Treaty 
of Point Elliot in 1855 stated that the Samish were to be relocated to 
the Lummi Reservation. After the Treaty of Point Elliot, many Samish 
individuals relocated to either the Lummi Reservation or the Swinomish 
Reservation (Ruby and Brown 1986:179). Many Samish, however, chose to 
remain in their old village sites.

[[Page 36673]]

    Officials of the Burke Museum have determined that, pursuant to 25 
U.S.C. 3001(9), the human remains listed above represent the physical 
remains of at least one individual of Native American ancestry. 
Officials of the Burke Museum also have determined that, pursuant to 25 
U.S.C. 3001(2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that 
can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and 
the Lummi Tribe of the Lummi Reservation, Washington; Samish Indian 
Tribe, Washington; and Swinomish Indians of the Swinomish Reservation, 
Washington.
    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Dr. 
Peter Lape, Burke Museum, University of Washington, Box 353010, 
Seattle, WA 98195, telephone (206) 685-3849, before July 28, 2010. 
Repatriation of the human remains to the Lummi Tribe of the Lummi 
Reservation, Washington; Samish Indian Tribe, Washington; and Swinomish 
Indians of the Swinomish Reservation, Washington, may proceed after 
that date if no additional claimants come forward.
    The Burke Museum is responsible for notifying the Lummi Tribe of 
the Lummi Reservation, Washington; Samish Indian Tribe, Washington; and 
Swinomish Indians of the Swinomish Reservation, Washington, that this 
notice has been published.

    Dated: June 22, 2010
Sherry Hutt,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2010-15595 Filed 6-25-10; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-S