Foreign-Trade Zone 203; Application for Subzone Authority; REC Silicon; Invitation for Public Comment on Preliminary Recommendation, 31762-31763 [2010-13455]

Download as PDF 31762 Federal Register / Vol. 75, No. 107 / Friday, June 4, 2010 / Notices instrument and instructions should be directed to Patsy A. Bearden, (907) 586– 7008 or patsy.bearden@noaa.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: [FR Doc. 2010–13431 Filed 6–3–10; 8:45 am] I. Abstract BILLING CODE 3510–22–P Regulations at 50 CFR part 679.24(a) require that all hook-and-line, longline pot, and pot-and-line marker buoys carried onboard or used by any vessel regulated under 50 CFR part 679 shall be marked with the vessel name and Federal fisheries permit number or Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G) vessel registration number. The regulations also specify the size and color of markings. The marking of gear aids law enforcement and enables other fishermen to report on misplaced gear. II. Method of Collection No information is submitted; this is a gear-marking requirement. III. Data OMB Control Number: 0648–0353. Form Number: None. Type of Review: Regular submission. Affected Public: Business or other forprofit organizations; individuals or households. Estimated Number of Respondents: 1,692. Estimated Time per Response: 15 minutes per buoy. Estimated Total Annual Burden Hours: 3,138. Estimated Total Annual Cost to Public: $16,920. srobinson on DSKHWCL6B1PROD with NOTICES IV. Request for Comments Comments are invited on: (a) Whether the proposed collection of information is necessary for the proper performance of the functions of the agency, including whether the information shall have practical utility; (b) the accuracy of the agency’s estimate of the burden (including hours and cost) of the proposed collection of information; (c) ways to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; and (d) ways to minimize the burden of the collection of information on respondents, including through the use of automated collection techniques or other forms of information technology. Comments submitted in response to this notice will be summarized and/or included in the request for OMB approval of this information collection; they also will become a matter of public record. VerDate Mar<15>2010 Dated: June 1, 2010. Gwellnar Banks, Management Analyst, Office of the Chief Information Officer. 16:01 Jun 03, 2010 Jkt 220001 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board [Docket 22–2009] Foreign-Trade Zone 203; Application for Subzone Authority; REC Silicon; Invitation for Public Comment on Preliminary Recommendation The FTZ Board is inviting public comment on its staff’s preliminary recommendation pertaining to the application by the Port of Moses Lake Public Corporation to establish a subzone at the REC Silicon facility in Moses Lake, Washington (Docket 22– 2009). The staff’s preliminary recommendation is for approval of the application with a restriction prohibiting admission of foreign status silicon metal subject to an anti-dumping duty (AD) or countervailing duty (CVD) order. The bases for this finding are as follows: Analysis of the application record indicates that full approval of the request could negatively impact domestic silicon metal production. This finding is based primarily on the potential impact to domestic silicon metal prices compounded by multiple applications potentially involving avoidance of AD/CVD duties on silicon metal used in export production. Although REC Silicon’s current domestic purchases account for only a small portion of domestic silicon metal production, the company has been expanding its capacity and will need increased amounts of silicon metal as that production comes online. Thus, access to silicon metal subject to AD/ CVD duties for its export production (currently over 95% of production) could encourage the company to source silicon metal subject to AD/CVD orders for its expanded production, instead of increasing domestic sourcing or sourcing imported silicon metal that is not subject to AD/CVD orders. A key consideration in this request is the cumulative effect on domestic silicon metal prices and on the integrity of the domestic silicon metal industry’s AD/CVD relief should there be multiple applications to avoid AD/CVD duties on silicon metal for export production. In addition to the REC Silicon application, a similar application is pending for Dow Corning Corporation in Kentucky and PO 00000 Frm 00020 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 we have received indication that further requests are being prepared for additional facilities. In its application, REC Silicon indicates that if it is granted full approval, other U.S. polysilison producers will likely apply for similar benefits. Given the production capacity of REC Silicon’s domestic facilities, as well as those of the other U.S. producers, the ripple effect on silicon metal suppliers would be significant and the resulting impact would likely be a decline in the U.S. price of silicon metal. Currently, very little silicon metal subject to AD/CVD orders is imported into the United States. However, the potential increase in supply to the U.S. market from the use of silicon metal subject to AD/CVD orders at this plant and others in the industry, and the resulting price effect, would likely be significant. In part due to the AD/CVD duties in place, U.S. silicon metal prices have increased. This has led to the recent restarting of a shuttered silicon metal production facility in New York. A weakening of the U.S. price of silicon metal could threaten the viability of this facility as well as the continuation of production at other domestic facilities. Given the volume of silicon metal involved in the current and anticipated applications, even a limit on the amount of silicon metal subject to AD/CVD orders that could be used in the facility for export production could have a significant impact on the U.S. price of silicon metal. The timing of that impact would also be occurring as domestic silicon metal production facilities are recovering and restarting, likely due (at least in part) to the relief provided through the AD/CVD orders that are in place. The FTZ regulations require that evaluations of manufacturing authority consider, ‘‘whether the approval is consistent with trade policy and programs, and whether its net economic effect is positive’’ (15 CFR 400.31(a)). In this case, given the potential impact on the silicon metal industry and based on the evidence currently on the record, the staff is unable to find that the net (national) economic effect of approving the use of silicon metal subject to AD/ CVD orders for export production would be positive. While unrestricted approval could have a negative impact, the issues raised do not extend to silicon metal not subject to AD/CVD orders. No arguments or evidence have been presented to the FTZ Board in opposition to FTZ savings on silicon metal not subject to AD/CVD orders. Since REC Silicon indicated that they do not currently anticipate using silicon E:\FR\FM\04JNN1.SGM 04JNN1 Federal Register / Vol. 75, No. 107 / Friday, June 4, 2010 / Notices metal subject to AD/CVD orders, activity under the proposed restricted approval would provide REC Silicon with the full savings estimated in the application. The company has indicated that those savings would enhance the cost competitiveness of its Washington facility, which would help to encourage continued production and employment at the facility. Public comment on the preliminary recommendation and the bases for the finding is invited through July 12, 2010. Rebuttal comments may be submitted during the subsequent 15-day period, until July 27, 2010. Submissions (original and one electronic copy) shall be addressed to the Board’s Executive Secretary at: Foreign-Trade Zones Board, U.S. Department of Commerce, Room 2111, 1401 Constitution Ave., NW., Washington, DC 20230. For further information, contact Elizabeth Whiteman at Elizabeth.Whiteman@trade.gov or (202) 482–0473. Dated: May 28, 2010. Andrew McGilvray, Executive Secretary. [FR Doc. 2010–13455 Filed 6–3–10; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3510–DS–P DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board [Docket 20–2009] srobinson on DSKHWCL6B1PROD with NOTICES Foreign-Trade Zone 29; Application for Subzone Authority; Dow Corning Corporation; Invitation for Public Comment on Preliminary Recommendation The FTZ Board is inviting public comment on its staff’s preliminary recommendation pertaining to the application by the Louisville and Jefferson County Riverport Authority to establish a subzone at the Dow Corning Corporation (Dow Corning) facilities in Carrollton, Elizabethtown and Shepherdsville, Kentucky (Docket 20– 2009). The staff’s preliminary recommendation is for approval of the application with a restriction prohibiting admission of foreign status silicon metal subject to an anti-dumping duty (AD) or countervailing duty (CVD) order. The bases for this finding are as follows: Analysis of the application record indicates that full approval of the request could negatively impact domestic silicon metal production. This finding is based primarily on the potential impact to domestic silicon metal prices from the volume of VerDate Mar<15>2010 16:01 Jun 03, 2010 Jkt 220001 production involved and the cumulative impact of multiple applications potentially involving avoidance of AD/ CVD duties on silicon metal used in export production. Dow Corning is a major U.S. consumer of silicon metal, and access to the material for its export production without the payment of AD/CVD duties would decrease the average price of silicon metal paid by the company, providing a new, lower benchmark to be used in supply negotiations. Given the volume of silicon metal consumed by the company in the U.S., the ripple effect on silicon metal suppliers could be significant and the likely resulting impact would be a decline in the U.S. price of silicon metal. Currently, very little silicon metal subject to AD/CVD orders is imported into the United States. However, due to the size of Dow Corning’s production in the U.S., and the amount of silicon metal consumed by the company’s operations, the potential increase in supply to the U.S. market and resulting price effect would likely be significant. In part due to the AD/CVD duties in place, U.S. silicon metal prices have increased. This has led to the recent restarting of a shuttered silicon metal production facility in New York. A weakening of the U.S. price of silicon metal could threaten the viability of this facility as well as the continuation of production at other domestic facilities. The preliminary recommendation also reflects the cumulative effect on domestic silicon metal prices and on the integrity of the domestic silicon metal industry’s AD/CVD relief should there be multiple applications to avoid AD/ CVD duties on silicon metal for export production. In addition to the Dow Corning application, a similar application is pending for REC Silicon in Moses Lake, Washington and we have received indication that further requests are being prepared for additional facilities. Given the volume of silicon metal involved in the current and anticipated applications, even a limit on the amount of silicon metal subject to AD/CVD orders that could be used in the facilities for export production could have a significant impact on the U.S. price of silicon metal. The timing of that impact would also be occurring as domestic silicon metal production facilities are recovering and restarting, likely due (at least in part) to the relief provided through the AD/CVD orders that are in place. The FTZ regulations require that evaluations of manufacturing authority consider, ‘‘whether the approval is consistent with trade policy and programs, and whether PO 00000 Frm 00021 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 31763 its net economic effect is positive’’ (15 CFR 400.31(a)). In this case, given the potential impact on the silicon metal industry and based on the evidence currently on the record, the staff is unable to find that the net (national) economic effect of approving the use of silicon metal subject to AD/CVD orders for export production would be positive. While unrestricted approval could have a negative impact, the issues raised do not extend to silicon metal not subject to AD/CVD orders. No arguments or evidence have been presented to the FTZ Board in opposition to FTZ savings on silicon metal not subject to AD/CVD orders and on other imported components. Such savings would allow for duty deferral, inverted tariff, scrap and export savings on imported silicon metal and other components not subject to AD/CVD orders. In addition, the facilities could benefit from logistical savings involved in FTZ operations. The savings from restricted approval would constitute a significant portion of those projected in the application and could help encourage continued production and employment at Dow Corning’s Kentucky facilities. Public comment on the preliminary recommendation and the bases for the finding is invited through July 12, 2010. Rebuttal comments may be submitted during the subsequent 15-day period, until July 27, 2010. Submissions (original and one electronic copy) shall be addressed to the Board’s Executive Secretary at: Foreign-Trade Zones Board, U.S. Department of Commerce, Room 2111, 1401 Constitution Ave., NW., Washington, DC 20230. For further information, contact Elizabeth Whiteman at Elizabeth.Whiteman@trade.gov or (202) 482–0473. Dated: May 28, 2010. Andrew McGilvray, Executive Secretary. [FR Doc. 2010–13454 Filed 6–3–10; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3510–DS–P DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE United States Patent and Trademark Office [Docket No.: PTO–P–2010–0035] Enhanced Examination Timing Control Initiative; Notice of Public Meeting AGENCY: United States Patent and Trademark Office, Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meeting; request for comments. E:\FR\FM\04JNN1.SGM 04JNN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 75, Number 107 (Friday, June 4, 2010)]
[Notices]
[Pages 31762-31763]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2010-13455]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

Foreign-Trade Zones Board

[Docket 22-2009]


Foreign-Trade Zone 203; Application for Subzone Authority; REC 
Silicon; Invitation for Public Comment on Preliminary Recommendation

    The FTZ Board is inviting public comment on its staff's preliminary 
recommendation pertaining to the application by the Port of Moses Lake 
Public Corporation to establish a subzone at the REC Silicon facility 
in Moses Lake, Washington (Docket 22-2009). The staff's preliminary 
recommendation is for approval of the application with a restriction 
prohibiting admission of foreign status silicon metal subject to an 
anti-dumping duty (AD) or countervailing duty (CVD) order. The bases 
for this finding are as follows:
    Analysis of the application record indicates that full approval of 
the request could negatively impact domestic silicon metal production. 
This finding is based primarily on the potential impact to domestic 
silicon metal prices compounded by multiple applications potentially 
involving avoidance of AD/CVD duties on silicon metal used in export 
production.
    Although REC Silicon's current domestic purchases account for only 
a small portion of domestic silicon metal production, the company has 
been expanding its capacity and will need increased amounts of silicon 
metal as that production comes online. Thus, access to silicon metal 
subject to AD/CVD duties for its export production (currently over 95% 
of production) could encourage the company to source silicon metal 
subject to AD/CVD orders for its expanded production, instead of 
increasing domestic sourcing or sourcing imported silicon metal that is 
not subject to AD/CVD orders.
    A key consideration in this request is the cumulative effect on 
domestic silicon metal prices and on the integrity of the domestic 
silicon metal industry's AD/CVD relief should there be multiple 
applications to avoid AD/CVD duties on silicon metal for export 
production. In addition to the REC Silicon application, a similar 
application is pending for Dow Corning Corporation in Kentucky and we 
have received indication that further requests are being prepared for 
additional facilities. In its application, REC Silicon indicates that 
if it is granted full approval, other U.S. polysilison producers will 
likely apply for similar benefits. Given the production capacity of REC 
Silicon's domestic facilities, as well as those of the other U.S. 
producers, the ripple effect on silicon metal suppliers would be 
significant and the resulting impact would likely be a decline in the 
U.S. price of silicon metal.
    Currently, very little silicon metal subject to AD/CVD orders is 
imported into the United States. However, the potential increase in 
supply to the U.S. market from the use of silicon metal subject to AD/
CVD orders at this plant and others in the industry, and the resulting 
price effect, would likely be significant.
    In part due to the AD/CVD duties in place, U.S. silicon metal 
prices have increased. This has led to the recent restarting of a 
shuttered silicon metal production facility in New York. A weakening of 
the U.S. price of silicon metal could threaten the viability of this 
facility as well as the continuation of production at other domestic 
facilities.
    Given the volume of silicon metal involved in the current and 
anticipated applications, even a limit on the amount of silicon metal 
subject to AD/CVD orders that could be used in the facility for export 
production could have a significant impact on the U.S. price of silicon 
metal. The timing of that impact would also be occurring as domestic 
silicon metal production facilities are recovering and restarting, 
likely due (at least in part) to the relief provided through the AD/CVD 
orders that are in place. The FTZ regulations require that evaluations 
of manufacturing authority consider, ``whether the approval is 
consistent with trade policy and programs, and whether its net economic 
effect is positive'' (15 CFR 400.31(a)). In this case, given the 
potential impact on the silicon metal industry and based on the 
evidence currently on the record, the staff is unable to find that the 
net (national) economic effect of approving the use of silicon metal 
subject to AD/CVD orders for export production would be positive.
    While unrestricted approval could have a negative impact, the 
issues raised do not extend to silicon metal not subject to AD/CVD 
orders. No arguments or evidence have been presented to the FTZ Board 
in opposition to FTZ savings on silicon metal not subject to AD/CVD 
orders. Since REC Silicon indicated that they do not currently 
anticipate using silicon

[[Page 31763]]

metal subject to AD/CVD orders, activity under the proposed restricted 
approval would provide REC Silicon with the full savings estimated in 
the application. The company has indicated that those savings would 
enhance the cost competitiveness of its Washington facility, which 
would help to encourage continued production and employment at the 
facility.
    Public comment on the preliminary recommendation and the bases for 
the finding is invited through July 12, 2010. Rebuttal comments may be 
submitted during the subsequent 15-day period, until July 27, 2010. 
Submissions (original and one electronic copy) shall be addressed to 
the Board's Executive Secretary at: Foreign-Trade Zones Board, U.S. 
Department of Commerce, Room 2111, 1401 Constitution Ave., NW., 
Washington, DC 20230.
    For further information, contact Elizabeth Whiteman at 
Elizabeth.Whiteman@trade.gov or (202) 482-0473.

    Dated: May 28, 2010.
Andrew McGilvray,
Executive Secretary.
[FR Doc. 2010-13455 Filed 6-3-10; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 3510-DS-P