Notice of Inventory Completion: Museum of Cultural and Natural History, Central Michigan University, Mt. Pleasant, MI, 16175-16176 [2010-7254]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 75, No. 61 / Wednesday, March 31, 2010 / Notices SUMMARY: As required by the Paperwork Reduction Act, the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) is submitting the information collection, titled ‘‘Navajo Partitioned Lands Grazing Permits, 25 CFR 161’’ to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for renewal. The information collection is currently authorized by OMB Control Number 1076–0162, which expires March 31, 2010. The information collection requires the Navajo Nation, members of the Navajo Nation, and tribal organizations authorized by the Navajo Nation to submit certain information in order to obtain, modify, or assign a grazing permit. DATES: Interested persons are invited to submit comments on or before April 30, 2010. ADDRESSES: You may submit comments on the information collection to the Desk Officer for Department of the Interior at the Office of Management and Budget, by facsimile to (202) 395–5806 or you may send an e-mail to: OIRA_DOCKET@omb.eop.gov. Please send a copy of your comments to David Edington, Office of Trust Services, Bureau of Indian Affairs, Department of the Interior, 1849 C Street, NW., Mail Stop 4655, Washington, DC 20240, facsimile: (202) 219–0006, or e-mail David.Edington@bia.gov. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: You may request further information or obtain copies of the information collection request submission from David Edington, telephone: (202) 513– 0886. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: jlentini on DSKJ8SOYB1PROD with NOTICES I. Abstract The BIA is seeking renewal of the approval for the information collection conducted under 25 CFR part 161, implementing the Navajo-Hopi Settlement Act of 1974, 24 U.S.C. 640d– 6402–31, as amended by the NavajoHopi Indian Relocation Amendments Acts of 1980, 94 Stat. 929, and the Federal court decisions of Healing v. Jones, 174 F. Supp.211 (D. Ariz. 1959) (Healing I), Healing v. Jones, 210 F. Suppl 126 (D. Ariz. 1962), aff’d 363 U.S. 758 (1963) (Healing II), Hopi Tribe v. Watt, 530 F. Supp. 1217 (D. Ariz. 1982), and Hopi Tribe v. Watt, 719 F.2d 314 (9th Cir. 1983). This information collection allows BIA to receive the information necessary to determine whether an applicant to obtain, modify, or assign a grazing permit on Navajo-partitioned lands is eligible and complies with all applicable grazing requirements. No third party notification or public VerDate Nov<24>2008 19:40 Mar 30, 2010 Jkt 220001 disclosure burden is associated with this collection. II. Request for Comments The BIA requests that you send your comments on this collection to the locations listed in the ADDRESSES section. Your comments should address: (a) The necessity of the information collection for the proper performance of the agencies, including whether the information will have practical utility; (b) the accuracy of the agencies’ estimate of the burden (hours and cost) of the collection of information, including the validity of the methodology and assumptions used; (c) ways we could enhance the quality, utility and clarity of the information to be collected; and (d) ways we could minimize the burden of the collection of the information on the respondents, such as through the use of automated collection techniques or other forms of information technology. Please note that an agency may not sponsor or conduct, and an individual need not respond to, a collection of information unless it has a valid OMB Control Number. It is our policy to make all comments available to the public for review at the location listed in the ADDRESSES section during the hours of 9 a.m.–5 p.m., Eastern Time, Monday through Friday except for legal holidays. Before including your address, phone number, e-mail address or other personally identifiable information, be advised that your entire comment—including your personally identifiable information— may be made public at any time. While you may request that we withhold your personally identifiable information, we cannot guarantee that we will be able to do so. OMB has up to 60 days to make a decision on the submission for renewal, but may make the decision after 30 days. Therefore, to receive the best consideration of your comments, you should submit them closer to 30 days than 60 days. As required under 5 CFR 1320.8(d), a Federal Register notice soliciting comments on this collection of information was published on February 24, 2010 (75 FR 8731). No comments were received. This notice provides the public with an additional 30 days in which to comment on the following information collection activity. III. Data OMB Control Number: 1076–0162. Title: Navajo Partitioned Lands Grazing Permits, 25 CFR 161. Brief Description of Collection: Submission of this information is PO 00000 Frm 00110 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 16175 required for Navajo Nation representatives, members, and authorized tribal organizations to obtain, modify or assign a grazing permit on Navajo partitioned lands. Response is required to obtain a benefit. Type of Review: Extension without change of a currently approved collection. Respondents: Tribes, tribal organizations, and individual Indians. Number of Respondents: 700. Total Number of Responses: 3,120. Estimated Time per Response: Varies, from 15 minutes to 1 hour. Estimated Total Annual Burden: 1,188 hours. Alvin Foster, Acting Chief Information Officer—Indian Affairs. [FR Doc. 2010–7174 Filed 3–30–10; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4310–4J–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Museum of Cultural and Natural History, Central Michigan University, Mt. Pleasant, MI National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects in the possession of the Museum of Cultural and Natural History, Central Michigan University, Mt. Pleasant, MI. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from Arenac, Isabella, and Saginaw Counties, MI. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Museum of Cultural and Natural History professional staff and physical anthropologists from Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI, and the University of Western Ontario, Canada, and in consultation with representatives of the Little Traverse Bay Bands of E:\FR\FM\31MRN1.SGM 31MRN1 jlentini on DSKJ8SOYB1PROD with NOTICES 16176 Federal Register / Vol. 75, No. 61 / Wednesday, March 31, 2010 / Notices Odawa Indians, Michigan, and the Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan. In 1970, human remains representing a minimum of two individuals were removed from Point Lookout, 20AC18, in Arenac County, MI. Students from Central Michigan University and amateur archeologists excavated the site and the material was immediately turned over to the Museum of Cultural and Natural History. No known individuals were identified. The 11 associated funerary objects are 2 (reconstructed) ceramic vessels, 1 piece of worked bone, 1 small sheet of copper, 1 bag of ochre sand, 1 stone object, 1 bag of ceramic sherds, 1 group of copper beads and bead fragments, 1 stone tool, 1 bone needle, and 1 tooth from an unknown animal. Archeological evidence dates the material from the Early Late Woodland Era, and the determination is supported by publications of the State Archaeologist’s Office of Michigan. The human remains were identified as being of Native American ancestry based on archeological dating and osteological examination. In 1970–1971, human remains representing a minimum of 18 individuals were removed from Indian Mound Park, 20IB1, in Isabella County, MI. Faculty and students from Central Michigan University excavated the site and the material was immediately turned over to the Museum of Cultural and Natural History. No known individuals were identified. The five associated funerary objects are one celt, one projectile point, and three ceramic sherds. Archeological evidence dates the material from the Early Late Woodland Era, and the determination is supported by publications of the State Archaeologist’s Office of Michigan. The human remains were identified as being of Native American ancestry based on archeological dating and osteological examination. From 1968 to 1970, and in 1972, human remains representing a minimum 124 individuals were removed from the Frazier-Tyra site, 20SA9, in Saginaw County, MI. Amateur archeologists excavated the site from 1968 to 1970, and turned over the material to the Anthropology Department of Central Michigan University, which transferred it to the Museum of Cultural and Natural History in the early 1990s. Students from Central Michigan University excavated the site again in 1972, and immediately turned over the materials they found to the Museum of Cultural and Natural History. No known individuals were VerDate Nov<24>2008 19:40 Mar 30, 2010 Jkt 220001 identified. The 372 associated funerary objects are 285 ceramic sherds, 76 pieces of lithic debitage, 4 scrapers, 1 piece of copper, 1 abrading stone, 1 projectile point, 1 piece of conch, 1 bag of ochre, 1 pipe and 1 pipe fragment. Archeological evidence dates the material from the Early Late Woodland Era, and the determination is supported by publications of the State Archaeologist’s Office of Michigan. The human remains were identified as being of Native American ancestry based on archeological dating and osteological examination. The area of Arenac, Isabella, and Saginaw Counties in mid-Michigan has a long established history of Native American occupation before European encroachment in the early 17th century. The Anishnaabek, which is comprised of the Odawa/Ottawa, Ojibwe/Chippewa and Potawatomi, have long called this area home. Officials of the Museum of Cultural and Natural History have reasonably determined that the individuals described above from Arenac, Isabella, and Saginaw Counties are Native American, however, officials of the Museum of Cultural and Natural History have determined that the evidence is insufficient to determine cultural affiliation with any present-day Indian tribe. Officials of the Museum of Cultural and Natural History have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9–10), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of 144 individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of the Museum of Cultural and Natural History also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(A), the 388 objects described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials of the Museum of Cultural and Natural History have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), a relationship of shared group identity cannot be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and any present-day Indian tribe. The Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Review Committee (Review Committee) is responsible for recommending specific actions for disposition of culturally unidentifiable human remains. In February 2009, the Museum of Cultural and Natural History requested that the Review Committee recommend disposition of the 144 culturally unidentifiable human remains and associated funerary objects to the Little PO 00000 Frm 00111 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, Michigan, and the Saginaw Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Michigan, as the aboriginal occupants of the lands encompassing the present-day Arenac, Isabella, and Saginaw Counties, MI. The Review Committee considered the proposal at its May 23 - 24, 2009 meeting and recommended disposition of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, Michigan, and the Saginaw Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Michigan. A September 16, 2009, letter on behalf of the Secretary of Interior from the Designated Federal Official transmitted the authorization for the museum to effect disposition of the culturally unidentifiable human remains and associated funerary objects to the two Indian tribes listed above contingent on the publication of a Notice of Inventory Completion in the Federal Register. This notice fulfills that requirement. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary objects should contact Dr. Pamela Gates, NAGPRA Representative, Museum of Cultural and Natural History, 103 Rowe Hall, Central Michigan University, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859, telephone (989) 774–3341, before April 30, 2010. Disposition of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, Michigan, and the Saginaw Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Michigan may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The Museum of Cultural and Natural History is responsible for notifying the Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, Michigan, and the Saginaw Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Michigan that this notice has been published. Dated: March 2, 2010 Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. 2010–7254 Filed 3–30–10; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Notice of Lodging of Consent Decrees Under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Notice is hereby given that on March 1, 2010, a proposed Consent Decree in the case of United States and the Coeur d’Alene Tribe v. Sidney Resources Corp., civ. no. 10–00112–BLW, was lodged concurrently with the filing of a E:\FR\FM\31MRN1.SGM 31MRN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 75, Number 61 (Wednesday, March 31, 2010)]
[Notices]
[Pages 16175-16176]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2010-7254]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service


Notice of Inventory Completion: Museum of Cultural and Natural 
History, Central Michigan University, Mt. Pleasant, MI

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

    Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves 
Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the 
completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary 
objects in the possession of the Museum of Cultural and Natural 
History, Central Michigan University, Mt. Pleasant, MI. The human 
remains and associated funerary objects were removed from Arenac, 
Isabella, and Saginaw Counties, MI.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). 
The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National 
Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Museum 
of Cultural and Natural History professional staff and physical 
anthropologists from Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI, and 
the University of Western Ontario, Canada, and in consultation with 
representatives of the Little Traverse Bay Bands of

[[Page 16176]]

Odawa Indians, Michigan, and the Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of 
Michigan.
    In 1970, human remains representing a minimum of two individuals 
were removed from Point Lookout, 20AC18, in Arenac County, MI. Students 
from Central Michigan University and amateur archeologists excavated 
the site and the material was immediately turned over to the Museum of 
Cultural and Natural History. No known individuals were identified. The 
11 associated funerary objects are 2 (reconstructed) ceramic vessels, 1 
piece of worked bone, 1 small sheet of copper, 1 bag of ochre sand, 1 
stone object, 1 bag of ceramic sherds, 1 group of copper beads and bead 
fragments, 1 stone tool, 1 bone needle, and 1 tooth from an unknown 
animal.
    Archeological evidence dates the material from the Early Late 
Woodland Era, and the determination is supported by publications of the 
State Archaeologist's Office of Michigan. The human remains were 
identified as being of Native American ancestry based on archeological 
dating and osteological examination.
    In 1970-1971, human remains representing a minimum of 18 
individuals were removed from Indian Mound Park, 20IB1, in Isabella 
County, MI. Faculty and students from Central Michigan University 
excavated the site and the material was immediately turned over to the 
Museum of Cultural and Natural History. No known individuals were 
identified. The five associated funerary objects are one celt, one 
projectile point, and three ceramic sherds.
    Archeological evidence dates the material from the Early Late 
Woodland Era, and the determination is supported by publications of the 
State Archaeologist's Office of Michigan. The human remains were 
identified as being of Native American ancestry based on archeological 
dating and osteological examination.
    From 1968 to 1970, and in 1972, human remains representing a 
minimum 124 individuals were removed from the Frazier-Tyra site, 20SA9, 
in Saginaw County, MI. Amateur archeologists excavated the site from 
1968 to 1970, and turned over the material to the Anthropology 
Department of Central Michigan University, which transferred it to the 
Museum of Cultural and Natural History in the early 1990s. Students 
from Central Michigan University excavated the site again in 1972, and 
immediately turned over the materials they found to the Museum of 
Cultural and Natural History. No known individuals were identified. The 
372 associated funerary objects are 285 ceramic sherds, 76 pieces of 
lithic debitage, 4 scrapers, 1 piece of copper, 1 abrading stone, 1 
projectile point, 1 piece of conch, 1 bag of ochre, 1 pipe and 1 pipe 
fragment.
    Archeological evidence dates the material from the Early Late 
Woodland Era, and the determination is supported by publications of the 
State Archaeologist's Office of Michigan. The human remains were 
identified as being of Native American ancestry based on archeological 
dating and osteological examination.
    The area of Arenac, Isabella, and Saginaw Counties in mid-Michigan 
has a long established history of Native American occupation before 
European encroachment in the early 17th century. The Anishnaabek, which 
is comprised of the Odawa/Ottawa, Ojibwe/Chippewa and Potawatomi, have 
long called this area home. Officials of the Museum of Cultural and 
Natural History have reasonably determined that the individuals 
described above from Arenac, Isabella, and Saginaw Counties are Native 
American, however, officials of the Museum of Cultural and Natural 
History have determined that the evidence is insufficient to determine 
cultural affiliation with any present-day Indian tribe.
    Officials of the Museum of Cultural and Natural History have 
determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9-10), the human remains 
described above represent the physical remains of 144 individuals of 
Native American ancestry. Officials of the Museum of Cultural and 
Natural History also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 
(3)(A), the 388 objects described above are reasonably believed to have 
been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death 
or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials of 
the Museum of Cultural and Natural History have determined that, 
pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), a relationship of shared group identity 
cannot be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains 
and associated funerary objects and any present-day Indian tribe.
    The Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Review 
Committee (Review Committee) is responsible for recommending specific 
actions for disposition of culturally unidentifiable human remains. In 
February 2009, the Museum of Cultural and Natural History requested 
that the Review Committee recommend disposition of the 144 culturally 
unidentifiable human remains and associated funerary objects to the 
Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, Michigan, and the Saginaw 
Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Michigan, as the aboriginal occupants of 
the lands encompassing the present-day Arenac, Isabella, and Saginaw 
Counties, MI. The Review Committee considered the proposal at its May 
23 - 24, 2009 meeting and recommended disposition of the human remains 
and associated funerary objects to the Little Traverse Bay Bands of 
Odawa Indians, Michigan, and the Saginaw Tribe of Chippewa Indians of 
Michigan. A September 16, 2009, letter on behalf of the Secretary of 
Interior from the Designated Federal Official transmitted the 
authorization for the museum to effect disposition of the culturally 
unidentifiable human remains and associated funerary objects to the two 
Indian tribes listed above contingent on the publication of a Notice of 
Inventory Completion in the Federal Register. This notice fulfills that 
requirement.
    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary 
objects should contact Dr. Pamela Gates, NAGPRA Representative, Museum 
of Cultural and Natural History, 103 Rowe Hall, Central Michigan 
University, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859, telephone (989) 774-3341, before 
April 30, 2010. Disposition of the human remains and associated 
funerary objects to the Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, 
Michigan, and the Saginaw Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Michigan may 
proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward.
    The Museum of Cultural and Natural History is responsible for 
notifying the Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians, Michigan, and 
the Saginaw Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Michigan that this notice has 
been published.

    Dated: March 2, 2010
Sherry Hutt,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. 2010-7254 Filed 3-30-10; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-S