Grand Challenges of the 21st Century; Request for Information, 5634-5636 [2010-2012]

Download as PDF 5634 Federal Register / Vol. 75, No. 22 / Wednesday, February 3, 2010 / Notices range of strategies for main control room abandonment, and the potential impact of fire-induced spurious electrical effects on crew performance. Due to the detailed nature of the processes described in this report and the level of effort required to provide a quality review, a request was submitted to the NRC for an extension of the public comment period for NUREG– 1921 (EPRI 1019196). NRC–RES reviewed this request and has agreed to extend the public comment period an additional 32 days to March 19, 2010. Dated at Rockville, Maryland, this 26th day of January, 2010. For the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Mark Salley, Chief, Fire Research Branch, Division of Risk Analysis, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. [FR Doc. 2010–2289 Filed 2–2–10; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 7590–01–P POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION Sunshine Act Meetings FEDERAL REGISTER CITATION OF PREVIOUS ANNOUNCEMENT: 75 FR 4429 (January 27, 2010). PREVIOUSLY ANNOUNCED TIME AND DATE: Wednesday, February 3, 2010 at 11 a.m. CHANGES IN THE MEETING: The Commission is adding item no. 13– discussion of confidential commercial information relative to a potential Commission contract (closed) to its February meeting agenda. This action is being taken pursuant to a determination of the Commission, by recorded vote, as to the need for the change in the agenda, the status of the new agenda item, and the inability to provide earlier notice. There is a related General Counsel certification as to the appropriateness of closing agenda item no. 13 to public observation. SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION [License No. 01/01–0414] Ironwood Mezzanine Fund II, L.P.; Notice Seeking Exemption Under Section 312 of the Small Business Investment Act, Conflicts of Interest Notice is hereby given that Ironwood Mezzanine Fund II, L.P. 200 Fisher Drive, Avon, CT 06001–3723, a Federal Licensee under the Small Business Investment Act of 1958, as amended (‘‘the Act’’), in connection with the financing of a small concern, has sought an exemption under Section 312 of the Act and Section 107.730, Financings which Constitute Conflicts of Interest of the Small Business Administration (‘‘SBA’’) Rules and Regulations (13 CFR 107.730). Ironwood Mezzanine Fund II, L.P. proposes to provide debt/equity security financing to Action Carting Environmental Services, Inc., 451 Frelinghuysen Avenue, Newark, NJ 07114. The financing is contemplated as part of a debt/equity issuance, the proceeds of which will be used for planned acquisitions. The financing is brought within the purview of § 107.730(a) of the Regulations because Ironwood Equity Fund, L.P., an Associate of Ironwood Mezzanine Fund II, L.P., owns more than ten percent of Action Carting Environmental Services, Inc., and this transaction is considered a Financing of an Associate requiring an exemption to the Regulations. Notice is hereby given that any interested person may submit written comments on the transaction, within 15 days of the date of publication, to the Associate Administrator for Investment, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409 Third Street, SW., Washington, DC 20416. Dated: January 19, 2010. Sean Greene, Associate Administrator for Investment. [FR Doc. 2010–2225 Filed 2–2–10; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE P OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY General Counsel, Postal Regulatory Commission, at 202-789-6820 or stephen.sharfman@prc.gov. jlentini on DSKJ8SOYB1PROD with NOTICES CONTACT PERSON FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: Stephen L. Sharfman, Grand Challenges of the 21st Century; Request for Information ACTION: Dated: February 1, 2010. Shoshana M. Grove, Secretary. [FR Doc. 2010–2450 Filed 2–1–E8; 4:15 pm] BILLING CODE 7710–FW–S VerDate Nov<24>2008 16:34 Feb 02, 2010 Jkt 220001 Notice. SUMMARY: On September 21, 2009, President Barack Obama released his ‘‘Strategy for American Innovation.’’ The strategy outlines the Administration’s plans to foster innovation for sustainable growth and the creation of high-quality jobs. PO 00000 Frm 00074 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 One of the goals of the President’s strategy is to harness science and technology to address the ‘‘grand challenges’’ of the 21st century. This Request for Information (RFI) is designed to collect input from the public regarding (1) The grand challenges that were identified in the strategy document; (2) other grand challenges that the Administration should consider, such as those identified by the National Academy of Engineering; (3) partners (e.g., companies, investors, foundations, social enterprises, non-profit organizations, philanthropists, research universities, consortia, etc.) that are interested in collaborating with each other and the Administration to achieve one or more of these goals, and (4) models for creating an ‘‘architecture of participation’’ that allows many individuals and organizations to contribute to these grand challenges. RFI Guidelines: Responses to this RFI should be submitted by 11:59 p.m. Eastern Time on April 15, 2010. Responses to this RFI must be delivered electronically as an attachment to an e-mail sent to challenge@ostp.gov. Responses to this notice are not offers and cannot be accepted by the Government to form a binding contract or issue a grant. Information obtained as a result of this RFI may be used by the government for program planning on a non-attribution basis. Do not include any information that might be considered proprietary or confidential. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Any questions about the content of this RFI should be sent to challenge@ostp.gov. Additional information regarding this RFI is at http://www.ostp.gov/ grandchallenges/. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Obama Administration believes that grand challenges should be an important organizing principle for America’s science, technology and innovation policy. Grand challenges can address key national priorities, catalyze innovations that catalyze economic growth and quality jobs, spur the formation of multidisciplinary teams of researcher and multi-sector collaborators, bring new expertise to bear on important problems, strengthen the ‘‘social contract’’ between science and society, and inspire students to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. There are multiple types of grand challenges. Some define important problems in a particular field of science and engineering. For example, in 1900, the German mathematics professor David Hilbert posed 23 ‘‘mathematical E:\FR\FM\03FEN1.SGM 03FEN1 jlentini on DSKJ8SOYB1PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 75, No. 22 / Wednesday, February 3, 2010 / Notices puzzles’’ which helped keep his contemporary and future colleagues busy for a century. Others pursue an advance in technological capability, such as the development of an exaflop supercomputer capable of one million trillion calculations per second. The focus of this RFI is on hard, unsolved scientific or engineering challenges that will have significant economic or societal impact and address an important national priority. The classic grand challenge is the ‘‘moon shot.’’ As President Kennedy said in his speech before a 1961 joint session of Congress, ‘‘I believe that this nation should commit itself to achieving the goal, before this decade is out, of landing a man on the moon and returning him safely to the Earth.’’ More recently, in the late 1980s, the United States launched an effort to sequence an entire human genome, which has transformed biomedical research and promises to improve healthcare. The Gates Foundation identified 14 grand challenges in global health in areas such as developing new or improved vaccines, controlling insect vectors, and creating low-cost diagnostics for global health conditions. Their goal is to radically improve in the developing world by ‘‘engaging creative minds across scientific disciplines, including those who have not traditionally taken part in health research.’’ See http:// www.grandchallenges.org for additional information. The National Academy of Engineering identified 14 engineering grand challenges associated with sustainability, health, security, and human empowerment, such as providing access to clean water, engineering better medicines, securing cyberspace, and restoring and improving urban infrastructure. These grand challenges are already beginning to have an impact on undergraduate education. Twenty-five universities have decided to participate in the Grand Challenge Scholars Program. Undergraduate students at these campuses will be able to tackle these problems by integrating research, an interdisciplinary curriculum, entrepreneurship, international activities, and service learning. Some universities are also organizing campuswide research initiatives around grand challenges. See http:// www.engineeringchallenges.org for additional information. In his ‘‘Strategy for American Innovation,’’ President Obama identified the following grand challenges: • Complete DNA sequencing of every case of cancer; smart anti-cancer VerDate Nov<24>2008 16:34 Feb 02, 2010 Jkt 220001 therapeutics that kill cancer cells and leave their normal neighbors untouched; early detection of dozens of diseases from a saliva sample; nanotechnology that delivers drugs precisely to the desired tissue; personalized medicine that enables the prescription of the right dose of the right drug for the right person; a universal vaccine for influenza that will protect against all future strains; and regenerative medicine that can end the agonizing wait for an organ transplant. • Solar cells as cheap as paint, and green buildings that produce all of the energy they consume. • A lightweight vest for soldiers and police officers that can stop an armorpiercing bullet. • Educational software that is as compelling as the best video game and as effective as a personal tutor; online courses that improve the more students use them; and a rich, interactive digital library at the fingertips of every child. • Intelligent prosthetics that will allow a veteran who has lost both of his arms to play the piano again. • Biological systems that can turn sunlight into carbon-neutral fuel, reduce the costs of producing anti-malarial drugs by a factor of 10, and quickly and inexpensively dispose of radioactive wastes and toxic chemicals. • An ‘‘exascale’’ supercomputer capable of a million trillion calculations per second—dramatically increasing our ability to understand the world around us through simulation and slashing the time needed to design complex products such as therapeutics, advanced materials, and highly efficient autos and aircraft. • Automatic, highly accurate and real-time translation between the major languages of the world—greatly lowering the barriers to international commerce and collaboration. Clearly, support for addressing such specific challenges should be only one element of the federal government’s overall R&D portfolio. The government also plays a critical role in supporting investigator-initiated research and research that is motivated solely by an interest in expanding the frontiers of human knowledge. RFI Response Instructions: The White House Office of Science and Technology Policy and the National Economic Council are interested in responses that address one or more of the following topics: PO 00000 Frm 00075 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 5635 Input Regarding Any of the Grand Challenges Identified by President Obama’s Strategy for American Innovation • Should the United States make it a priority to achieve this grand challenge? Why or why not? • What existing activities in the public and private sector could the United States build on to achieve this challenge? • What specific metrics or goals should the United States use to evaluate its progress towards this grand challenge? What roadmap would help inform decision-makers in the public and private sectors? • What are the most important scientific and technical challenges that would need to be addressed to realize this challenge? • What are the most important gaps in the nation’s R&D portfolio that should be addressed? What kinds of R&D investments (e.g. supports for individual investigators, small teams, centers, research infrastructure, etc.) should the United States Government emphasize? • What are the appropriate roles of the government, industry, academia and other stakeholders in achieving this challenge, and what new forms of collaboration should be explored? What are the appropriate roles for precompetitive collaboration and marketbased competition? • What are the economic, ethical, legal, and societal issues raised by pursuit of this challenge? What roles are there for researchers and scholars in the humanities and the social and behavioral sciences? • In addition to investment in R&D— what are other policies should the United States Government be considering to achieve this challenge and to realize the broader economic and societal benefits associated with related scientific and technological advances (e.g. procurement, incentive prizes, development or adoption of technical standards, international collaboration, targeted investment in education and workforce development, sponsorship of pilots or test beds, changes in legal, regulatory or other public policies)? Identification of Additional Grand Challenges • What are other grand challenges should the United States be considering, such as those identified by the National Academy of Engineering? Please provide input to one or more of the questions identified above. E:\FR\FM\03FEN1.SGM 03FEN1 5636 Federal Register / Vol. 75, No. 22 / Wednesday, February 3, 2010 / Notices Identification of Partners The Administration is interested in stimulating multi-sector collaborations to achieve these grand challenges that might involve companies, research universities, foundations, social enterprises, non-profits, and other stakeholders. • What partners or types of partners would need to collaborate to accomplish this goal? • What specifically would your organization be willing to do to achieve this grand challenge? • What models, institutions, technologies, and networks would enable broad participation by individuals and organizations in achieving these grand challenges? certified that, in his opinion, one or more of the exemptions set forth in 5 U.S.C. 552b(c)(3), (5), (7), 9(B) and (10) and 17 CFR 200.402(a)(3), (5), (7), 9(ii) and (10), permit consideration of the scheduled matter at the Closed Meeting. Commissioner Paredes, as duty officer, voted to consider the item listed for the Closed Meeting in a closed session. At times, changes in Commission priorities require alterations in the scheduling of meeting items. For further information and to ascertain what, if any, matters have been added, deleted or postponed, please contact: The Office of the Secretary at (202) 551–5400. M. David Hodge, Operations Manager, OSTP. Dated: February 1, 2010. Florence E. Harmon, Deputy Secretary. [FR Doc. 2010–2012 Filed 2–2–10; 8:45 am] [FR Doc. 2010–2424 Filed 2–1–10; 4:15 pm] BILLING CODE P BILLING CODE 8011–01–P SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION Sunshine Act Meetings Agency Information Collection Activities: Emergency Request Notice is hereby given, pursuant to the provisions of the Government in the Sunshine Act, Public Law 94–409, that the Securities and Exchange Commission will hold an Open Meeting on February 8, 2010 at 10 a.m., in the Auditorium, Room L–002, and a Closed Meeting on February 8, 2010 at 11 a.m. The subject matter of the February 8, 2010 Open Meeting will be: The Commission will hear oral argument in an appeal by vFinance Investments, Inc., a registered broker-dealer (the ‘‘Firm’’), and Richard Campanella, the Firm’s former chief compliance officer (together with the Firm, ‘‘Respondents’’) from the decision of an administrative law judge. The law judge found that the Firm willfully violated Section 17(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and Rules 17a–4(b)(4) and 17a–4(j) thereunder, by failing to preserve and promptly produce electronic communications, and that Campanella willfully aided and abetted and caused these violations. The law judge ordered Respondents to cease and desist, censured Campanella, and fined the Firm $100,000 and Campanella $30,000. The subject matter of the February 8, 2010 Closed Meeting will be: jlentini on DSKJ8SOYB1PROD with NOTICES [P]ost argument discussion. Commissioners, Counsel to the Commissioners, the Secretary to the Commission, and recording secretaries will attend the Closed Meeting. Certain staff members who have an interest in the matters also may be present. The General Counsel of the Commission, or his designee, has VerDate Nov<24>2008 16:34 Feb 02, 2010 Jkt 220001 The Social Security Administration (SSA) publishes a list of information collection packages requiring clearance by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) in compliance with Public Law 104–13, the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, effective October 1, 1995. This notice covers an emergency revision of an existing OMBapproved information collection. SSA is soliciting comments on the accuracy of the agency’s burden estimate; the need for the information; its practical utility; ways to enhance its quality, utility, and clarity; and ways to minimize burden on respondents, including the use of automated collection techniques or other forms of information technology. Mail, email, or fax your comments and recommendations on the information collection to the OMB Desk Officer and the SSA Reports Clearance Officer to the following addresses or fax numbers. (OMB) Office of Management and Budget, Attn: Desk Officer for SSA, Fax: 202–395– 6974, E-mail address: OIRA_Submission@omb.eop.gov (SSA) Social Security Administration, DCBFM, Attn: Reports Clearance Officer, 1340 Annex Building, 6401 Security Blvd., Baltimore, MD 21235, Fax: 410–965–8783, E-mail address: OPLM.RCO@ssa.gov. PO 00000 Frm 00076 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 9990 SSA submitted the information collection below to OMB for Emergency Clearance. SSA is requesting Emergency Clearance from OMB no later than February 10, 2010. Individuals can obtain copies of the collection instrument by calling the SSA Reports Clearance Officer or by writing to the above e-mail address. OIRA_Submission@omb.eop.gov Registration for Appointed Representative Services and Direct Payment—0960–0732. SSA uses Form SSA–1699 to register appointed representatives of claimants before SSA who: • Want to register for direct payment of fees; • Registered for direct payment of fees prior to October 31, 2009, but need to update their information; • Registered as appointed representatives on or after October 31, 2009, but need to update their information; or • Received a notice from SSA instructing them to complete this form. By registering these individuals, SSA: (1) Authenticates and authorizes them to do business with us; (2) allows them access to our records for the claimants they represent; (3) facilitates direct payment of authorized fees to appointed representatives; and (4) collects the information we will need to meet Internal Revenue Service (IRS) requirements to issue specific IRS forms if we pay these representatives in excess of a specific amount ($600). Although SSA currently uses a lengthier OMB-approved version of this form, we are requesting emergency clearance for an abbreviated version due to extensive comments from respondents indicating they need a simpler version immediately. The respondents are appointed representatives who meet the above criteria. Type of Request: Emergency clearance of an OMB-approved information collection. Number of Respondents: 52,800. Frequency of Response: 1. Average Burden per Response: 20 minutes. Estimated Annual Burden: 17,600 hours. Dated: January 29, 2010. Elizabeth A. Davidson, Director, Center for Reports Clearance, Social Security Administration. [FR Doc. 2010–2297 Filed 2–2–10; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4191–02–P E:\FR\FM\03FEN1.SGM 03FEN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 75, Number 22 (Wednesday, February 3, 2010)]
[Notices]
[Pages 5634-5636]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2010-2012]


=======================================================================
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY


Grand Challenges of the 21st Century; Request for Information

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: On September 21, 2009, President Barack Obama released his 
``Strategy for American Innovation.'' The strategy outlines the 
Administration's plans to foster innovation for sustainable growth and 
the creation of high-quality jobs.
    One of the goals of the President's strategy is to harness science 
and technology to address the ``grand challenges'' of the 21st century. 
This Request for Information (RFI) is designed to collect input from 
the public regarding (1) The grand challenges that were identified in 
the strategy document; (2) other grand challenges that the 
Administration should consider, such as those identified by the 
National Academy of Engineering; (3) partners (e.g., companies, 
investors, foundations, social enterprises, non-profit organizations, 
philanthropists, research universities, consortia, etc.) that are 
interested in collaborating with each other and the Administration to 
achieve one or more of these goals, and (4) models for creating an 
``architecture of participation'' that allows many individuals and 
organizations to contribute to these grand challenges.
    RFI Guidelines: Responses to this RFI should be submitted by 11:59 
p.m. Eastern Time on April 15, 2010. Responses to this RFI must be 
delivered electronically as an attachment to an e-mail sent to 
challenge@ostp.gov.
    Responses to this notice are not offers and cannot be accepted by 
the Government to form a binding contract or issue a grant. Information 
obtained as a result of this RFI may be used by the government for 
program planning on a non-attribution basis. Do not include any 
information that might be considered proprietary or confidential.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Any questions about the content of 
this RFI should be sent to challenge@ostp.gov.
    Additional information regarding this RFI is at http://www.ostp.gov/grandchallenges/.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Obama Administration believes that grand 
challenges should be an important organizing principle for America's 
science, technology and innovation policy. Grand challenges can address 
key national priorities, catalyze innovations that catalyze economic 
growth and quality jobs, spur the formation of multidisciplinary teams 
of researcher and multi-sector collaborators, bring new expertise to 
bear on important problems, strengthen the ``social contract'' between 
science and society, and inspire students to pursue careers in science, 
technology, engineering, and mathematics.
    There are multiple types of grand challenges. Some define important 
problems in a particular field of science and engineering. For example, 
in 1900, the German mathematics professor David Hilbert posed 23 
``mathematical

[[Page 5635]]

puzzles'' which helped keep his contemporary and future colleagues busy 
for a century. Others pursue an advance in technological capability, 
such as the development of an exaflop supercomputer capable of one 
million trillion calculations per second. The focus of this RFI is on 
hard, unsolved scientific or engineering challenges that will have 
significant economic or societal impact and address an important 
national priority.
    The classic grand challenge is the ``moon shot.'' As President 
Kennedy said in his speech before a 1961 joint session of Congress, ``I 
believe that this nation should commit itself to achieving the goal, 
before this decade is out, of landing a man on the moon and returning 
him safely to the Earth.'' More recently, in the late 1980s, the United 
States launched an effort to sequence an entire human genome, which has 
transformed biomedical research and promises to improve healthcare.
    The Gates Foundation identified 14 grand challenges in global 
health in areas such as developing new or improved vaccines, 
controlling insect vectors, and creating low-cost diagnostics for 
global health conditions. Their goal is to radically improve in the 
developing world by ``engaging creative minds across scientific 
disciplines, including those who have not traditionally taken part in 
health research.'' See http://www.grandchallenges.org for additional 
information.
    The National Academy of Engineering identified 14 engineering grand 
challenges associated with sustainability, health, security, and human 
empowerment, such as providing access to clean water, engineering 
better medicines, securing cyberspace, and restoring and improving 
urban infrastructure. These grand challenges are already beginning to 
have an impact on undergraduate education. Twenty-five universities 
have decided to participate in the Grand Challenge Scholars Program. 
Undergraduate students at these campuses will be able to tackle these 
problems by integrating research, an interdisciplinary curriculum, 
entrepreneurship, international activities, and service learning. Some 
universities are also organizing campus-wide research initiatives 
around grand challenges. See http://www.engineeringchallenges.org for 
additional information.
    In his ``Strategy for American Innovation,'' President Obama 
identified the following grand challenges:
     Complete DNA sequencing of every case of cancer; smart 
anti-cancer therapeutics that kill cancer cells and leave their normal 
neighbors untouched; early detection of dozens of diseases from a 
saliva sample; nanotechnology that delivers drugs precisely to the 
desired tissue; personalized medicine that enables the prescription of 
the right dose of the right drug for the right person; a universal 
vaccine for influenza that will protect against all future strains; and 
regenerative medicine that can end the agonizing wait for an organ 
transplant.
     Solar cells as cheap as paint, and green buildings that 
produce all of the energy they consume.
     A lightweight vest for soldiers and police officers that 
can stop an armor-piercing bullet.
     Educational software that is as compelling as the best 
video game and as effective as a personal tutor; online courses that 
improve the more students use them; and a rich, interactive digital 
library at the fingertips of every child.
     Intelligent prosthetics that will allow a veteran who has 
lost both of his arms to play the piano again.
     Biological systems that can turn sunlight into carbon-
neutral fuel, reduce the costs of producing anti-malarial drugs by a 
factor of 10, and quickly and inexpensively dispose of radioactive 
wastes and toxic chemicals.
     An ``exascale'' supercomputer capable of a million 
trillion calculations per second--dramatically increasing our ability 
to understand the world around us through simulation and slashing the 
time needed to design complex products such as therapeutics, advanced 
materials, and highly efficient autos and aircraft.
     Automatic, highly accurate and real-time translation 
between the major languages of the world--greatly lowering the barriers 
to international commerce and collaboration.
    Clearly, support for addressing such specific challenges should be 
only one element of the federal government's overall R&D portfolio. The 
government also plays a critical role in supporting investigator-
initiated research and research that is motivated solely by an interest 
in expanding the frontiers of human knowledge.
    RFI Response Instructions: The White House Office of Science and 
Technology Policy and the National Economic Council are interested in 
responses that address one or more of the following topics:

Input Regarding Any of the Grand Challenges Identified by President 
Obama's Strategy for American Innovation

     Should the United States make it a priority to achieve 
this grand challenge? Why or why not?
     What existing activities in the public and private sector 
could the United States build on to achieve this challenge?
     What specific metrics or goals should the United States 
use to evaluate its progress towards this grand challenge? What roadmap 
would help inform decision-makers in the public and private sectors?
     What are the most important scientific and technical 
challenges that would need to be addressed to realize this challenge?
     What are the most important gaps in the nation's R&D 
portfolio that should be addressed? What kinds of R&D investments (e.g. 
supports for individual investigators, small teams, centers, research 
infrastructure, etc.) should the United States Government emphasize?
     What are the appropriate roles of the government, 
industry, academia and other stakeholders in achieving this challenge, 
and what new forms of collaboration should be explored? What are the 
appropriate roles for pre-competitive collaboration and market-based 
competition?
     What are the economic, ethical, legal, and societal issues 
raised by pursuit of this challenge? What roles are there for 
researchers and scholars in the humanities and the social and 
behavioral sciences?
     In addition to investment in R&D--what are other policies 
should the United States Government be considering to achieve this 
challenge and to realize the broader economic and societal benefits 
associated with related scientific and technological advances (e.g. 
procurement, incentive prizes, development or adoption of technical 
standards, international collaboration, targeted investment in 
education and workforce development, sponsorship of pilots or test 
beds, changes in legal, regulatory or other public policies)?

Identification of Additional Grand Challenges

     What are other grand challenges should the United States 
be considering, such as those identified by the National Academy of 
Engineering? Please provide input to one or more of the questions 
identified above.

[[Page 5636]]

Identification of Partners

    The Administration is interested in stimulating multi-sector 
collaborations to achieve these grand challenges that might involve 
companies, research universities, foundations, social enterprises, non-
profits, and other stakeholders.
     What partners or types of partners would need to 
collaborate to accomplish this goal?
     What specifically would your organization be willing to do 
to achieve this grand challenge?
     What models, institutions, technologies, and networks 
would enable broad participation by individuals and organizations in 
achieving these grand challenges?

M. David Hodge,
Operations Manager, OSTP.
[FR Doc. 2010-2012 Filed 2-2-10; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE P