Amendment of Class E Airspace; Myrtle Beach, SC, 69271-69272 [E9-30288]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 74, No. 250 / Thursday, December 31, 2009 / Rules and Regulations (2) For service information identified in this AD, contact Boeing Commercial Airplanes, Attention: Data & Services Management, 3855 Lakewood Boulevard, MC D800–0019, Long Beach, California 90846– 0001; telephone 206–544–5000, extension 2; fax 206–766–5683; e-mail dse.boecom@boeing.com; Internet https:// www.myboeingfleet.com. (3) You may review copies of the service information at the FAA, Transport Airplane Directorate, 1601 Lind Avenue, SW., Renton, Washington. For information on the availability of this material at the FAA, call 425–227–1221 or 425–227–1152. (4) You may also review copies of the service information that is incorporated by reference at the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). For information on the availability of this material at NARA, call 202–741–6030, or go to: http://www.archives.gov/federal_register/ code_of_federal_regulations/ ibr_locations.html. Issued in Renton, Washington, on December 17, 2009. Stephen P. Boyd, Acting Manager, Transport Airplane Directorate, Aircraft Certification Service. [FR Doc. E9–30698 Filed 12–30–09; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–13–P DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 [Docket No. FAA–2009–0650; Airspace Docket No. 09–ASO–20] Amendment of Class E Airspace; Myrtle Beach, SC AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. This action changes the airport name for the Myrtle Beach, SC, Class E airspace area from Myrtle Beach AFB, to Myrtle Beach International Airport. This action also will update the geographic coordinates of the airports within the controlled airspace. DATES: Effective 0901 UTC, February 11, 2010. The Director of the Federal Register approves this incorporation by reference action under Title 1, Code of Federal Regulations, part 51, subject to the annual revision of FAA Order 7400.9 and publication of conforming amendments. erowe on DSK5CLS3C1PROD with RULES SUMMARY: FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Melinda Giddens, Operations Support Group, Eastern Service Center, Federal Aviation Administration, P.O. Box 20636, Atlanta, Georgia 30320; telephone (404) 305–5610. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: VerDate Nov<24>2008 13:48 Dec 30, 2009 Jkt 220001 History The FAA assumed responsibility for the Air Traffic Control Tower at Myrtle Beach AFB from the United States Air Force on December 27, 1992. On February 12, 1997, a final rule published in the Federal Register (62 FR 6698) established Class C airspace, revoked Class D airspace, and changed the airport name to Myrtle Beach International Airport, Myrtle Beach, SC. However, the existing Class E airspace area for Myrtle Beach, SC, was not amended to reflect the airport name change. This action will make that change. There are no changes to the boundaries or altitudes within this airspace area. Designations for Class E airspace areas extending upward from 700 feet or more above the surface of the earth are published in FAA Order 7400.9T, signed August 27, 2009, and effective September 15, 2009, which is incorporated by reference in 14 CFR part 71.1. The Class E designations listed in this document will be published subsequently in the Order. The Rule Frm 00029 detail the scope of the agency’s authority. This rulemaking is promulgated under the authority described in Subtitle VII, Part A, Subpart I, Section 40103. Under that section, the FAA is charged with prescribing regulations to assign the use of airspace necessary to ensure the safety of aircraft and the efficient use of airspace. This regulation in within the scope of that authority as it amends the airspace description for Myrtle Beach, SC, Class E airspace. Accordingly, since this action merely involves a change in the legal description of the Myrtle Beach, SC, Class E airspace area, and does not involve a change in the dimensions or operating requirements of that airspace, notice and public comment under 5 U.S.C. 553(b) are unnecessary. Lists of Subjects in 14 CFR Part 71 Airspace, Incorporation by reference, Navigation (air). The Amendment In consideration of the foregoing, the Federal Aviation Administration amends 14 CFR part 71 as follows: ■ This action amends Title 14, Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) part 71 by denoting the renaming of the airport from Myrtle Beach AFB, to Myrtle Beach International Airport, Myrtle Beach, SC. This action also adjusts the geographic coordinates of Myrtle Beach International Airport and Grand Strand Airport to coincide with the FAA’s National Aeronautical Charting Office. There are no changes to the boundaries or altitudes within this airspace area. The FAA has determined that this regulation only involves an established body of technical regulations for which frequent and routine amendments are necessary to keep them operationally current. It, therefore, (1) Is not a ‘‘significant regulatory action’’ under Executive Order 12866; (2) is not a ‘‘significant rule’’ under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of a Regulatory Evaluation as the anticipated impact is so minimal. Since this is a routine matter that will only affect air traffic procedures and air navigation, it is certified that this rule, when promulgated, will not have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small entities under the criteria of the Regulatory Flexibility Act. The FAA’s authority to issue rules regarding aviation safety is found in Title 49 of the U.S. Code. Subtitle 1, Section 106 describes the authority of the FAA Administrator. Subtitle VII, Aviation Programs, describes in more PO 00000 69271 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 PART 71—DESIGNATION OF CLASS A, B, C, D, AND E AIRSPACE AREAS; AIR TRAFFIC SERVICE ROUTES; AND REPORTING POINTS 1. The authority citation for part 71 continues to read as follows: ■ Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g); 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959– 1963 Comp., p. 389. § 71.1 [Amended] 2. The incorporation by reference in 14 CFR 71.1 of Federal Aviation Administration Order 7400.9T, Airspace Designations and Reporting Points, signed August 27, 2009, and effective September 15, 2009, is amended as follows: ■ Paragraph 6005 Class E Airspace Areas Extending Upward From 700 Feet or More Above the Surface of the Earth. * * ASO SC E5 * * * Myrtle Beach, SC [Amended] Myrtle Beach International Airport, SC (Lat. 33°40′47″ N., Long. 78°55′42″ W.) North Myrtle Beach, Grand Strand Airport, SC (Lat. 33°48′42″ N., Long. 78°43′26″ W.) That airspace extending upward from 700 feet above the surface within a 7-mile radius of the Myrtle Beach International Airport and within an 8-mile radius of Grand Strand Airport. * E:\FR\FM\31DER1.SGM * * 31DER1 * * 69272 Federal Register / Vol. 74, No. 250 / Thursday, December 31, 2009 / Rules and Regulations Issued in College Park, Georgia, on December 9, 2009. Barry A. Knight, Acting Manager, Operations Support Group, Eastern Service Center, Air Traffic Organization. [FR Doc. E9–30288 Filed 12–30–09; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910–13–P DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 93 [Docket No.: FAA–2008–1087; Amendment No. 93–95] RIN 2120–AJ29 Establishment of a Special Air Traffic Rule in the Vicinity of Luke Air Force Base (AFB), AZ erowe on DSK5CLS3C1PROD with RULES AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This rule establishes a Special Air Traffic Rule (SATR) in the vicinity of Luke Air Force Base (Luke) which requires aircraft operating under visual flight rules (VFR) to establish two-way radio communication with the Luke Radar Approach Control (RAPCON) prior to entering the SATR area and maintain communication while operating in the area. The SATR is active during official daylight hours Monday through Friday while Luke pilot flight training is underway, as broadcast on the local Automatic Terminal Information Service (ATIS), and other times by Notice to Airmen (NOTAM). This action is necessary to address reported near midair collisions (NMACs) in the area around Luke and will help reduce the potential for midair collisions in the vicinity of Luke. DATES: This amendment is effective May 6, 2010. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ken McElroy, Airspace and Rules Group, Office of System Operations Airspace and AIM, AJR–33 Federal Aviation Administration, 800 Independence Avenue, SW., Washington, DC 20591; telephone: (202) 267–8783. E-mail: Kenneth.McElroy@faa.gov. For legal questions concerning this final rule contact the Office of Chief Counsel, Regulations Division, Air Traffic & Certification of Airman Law Branch, AGC–240 Federal Aviation Administration, 800 Independence Avenue, SW., Washington, DC 20591; telephone: (202) 267–3073. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: VerDate Nov<24>2008 13:48 Dec 30, 2009 Jkt 220001 Authority for This Rulemaking The FAA’s authority to issue rules regarding aviation safety is found in Title 49 of the United States Code. Subtitle I, section 106, describes the authority of the FAA Administrator, including the authority to issue, rescind, and revise regulations. Subtitle VII, Aviation Programs, describes, in more detail, the scope of the agency’s authority. This rulemaking is promulgated under the authority described in subtitle VII, part A, subpart I, chapter 401, section 40103(b), which allows the Administrator to regulate the use of the navigable airspace necessary to ensure the safety of aircraft and the efficient use of airspace. Moreover, subtitle VII, part A, subpart III, chapter 447, section 44701(c) authorizes the Administrator to regulate air commerce in a way that helps to reduce or eliminate the possibility or recurrence of accidents in air transportation. This change is within the scope of our authority and is a reasonable and necessary exercise of our statutory obligations. Background Luke Air Force Base (Luke) is home to the 56th Fighter Wing, the United States Air Force’s (USAF’s) largest fighter wing. Since 1941, Luke has trained pilots and other aircrew members for America’s frontline fighter aircraft. Today, over 200 F–16s conduct more than 201,000 annual operations, and most of these operations are for student training. Situated beneath the Phoenix Class B Airspace Area, the Luke terminal area consists of Class D airspace. The Phoenix Deer Valley Airport (DVT), (the nation’s third busiest general aviation (GA) airport in 2004 and second busiest in 2008), is within 5 nautical miles of the Luke terminal airspace. There are two flight schools and two fixed base operators located at DVT, and the flight schools conduct training in the vicinity of Luke. Alert Area A–231 is located adjacent to, and west of, Luke. Pilots conduct a large volume of jet training operations in Alert Area A–231. The USAF requires military pilots to establish communication with the Luke Radar Approach Control (RAPCON) and to be alert when flying in Alert Area A–231. Pilots of civil aircraft are not required to establish communication with the Luke RAPCON during transit. The USAF Flight Safety Office at Luke points out that reported NMACs are approximately 3 per quarter of a year, and each occurrence affects multiple aircraft in the same formation. The significant PO 00000 Frm 00030 Fmt 4700 Sfmt 4700 number of NMACs between Luke F–16s and VFR aircraft indicates VFR pilots are not avoiding this area of concentrated student jet transition training. Operational problems affecting safety in the Luke terminal airspace area are acute and include complex and voluminous traffic, aircraft congestion, terrain that constrains aircraft operations, and the uncontrolled mix of instrument flight rules (IFR) and VFR traffic. Luke RAPCON traffic counts show a mix of military F–16 aircraft operations, GA traffic operations, and some civil air carrier operations. F–16 aircraft operate at significantly higher airspeeds than civil GA traffic, normally 200+ knots faster on arrival and 250+ knots faster on departure. This difference in airspeed creates extreme closure rates between converging F–16 and GA aircraft. In addition, complexity is increased because GA pilots often do not detect all the aircraft in a military flight formation. Student pilot training in the F–16 aircraft, combined with student flight training in GA aircraft, also increases the potential for a near midair collision. The average number of conflicts between controlled and uncontrolled aircraft has increased since 2000. In the five year period from 2000 to 2005, there were 76 NMACs reported. In the two year period from 2006 to 2008, 58 NMACs were reported. Aircraft track data modeling tools indicate a significant volume of GA traffic crossing Luke’s primary instrument final approach course. This data indicates a direct correlation between NMAC events and the proximity/flight patterns of GA traffic operating out of DVT. Data track analysis also shows GA traffic from Goodyear Airport (GYR) and Glendale Airport (GEU) crossing the final approach course and departure path for Runway 21 at Luke. For additional information regarding the Luke data track analysis go to: http:// www.faa.gov/about/office_org/ headquarters_offices/ato/service_units/ systemops/aaim/organizations/ airspace_rules/. There are a number of prominent landmarks the GA community uses when operating VFR. Two of these landmarks are the Glendale Arrowhead Mall and the Peoria Power Plant/ Substation, which are close to the Luke Runway 21 final approach course. Luke F–16s use the Peoria Power plant as a visual aid for turning to the final approach course when conducting formation landings. Also, many of the flight schools use the Proving Grounds, located approximately 5 miles north of the Luke Auxiliary Field, for conducting E:\FR\FM\31DER1.SGM 31DER1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 74, Number 250 (Thursday, December 31, 2009)]
[Rules and Regulations]
[Pages 69271-69272]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: E9-30288]


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DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

Federal Aviation Administration

14 CFR Part 71

[Docket No. FAA-2009-0650; Airspace Docket No. 09-ASO-20]


Amendment of Class E Airspace; Myrtle Beach, SC

AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT.

ACTION: Final rule.

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SUMMARY: This action changes the airport name for the Myrtle Beach, SC, 
Class E airspace area from Myrtle Beach AFB, to Myrtle Beach 
International Airport. This action also will update the geographic 
coordinates of the airports within the controlled airspace.

DATES: Effective 0901 UTC, February 11, 2010. The Director of the 
Federal Register approves this incorporation by reference action under 
Title 1, Code of Federal Regulations, part 51, subject to the annual 
revision of FAA Order 7400.9 and publication of conforming amendments.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Melinda Giddens, Operations Support 
Group, Eastern Service Center, Federal Aviation Administration, P.O. 
Box 20636, Atlanta, Georgia 30320; telephone (404) 305-5610.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

History

    The FAA assumed responsibility for the Air Traffic Control Tower at 
Myrtle Beach AFB from the United States Air Force on December 27, 1992. 
On February 12, 1997, a final rule published in the Federal Register 
(62 FR 6698) established Class C airspace, revoked Class D airspace, 
and changed the airport name to Myrtle Beach International Airport, 
Myrtle Beach, SC. However, the existing Class E airspace area for 
Myrtle Beach, SC, was not amended to reflect the airport name change. 
This action will make that change. There are no changes to the 
boundaries or altitudes within this airspace area. Designations for 
Class E airspace areas extending upward from 700 feet or more above the 
surface of the earth are published in FAA Order 7400.9T, signed August 
27, 2009, and effective September 15, 2009, which is incorporated by 
reference in 14 CFR part 71.1. The Class E designations listed in this 
document will be published subsequently in the Order.

The Rule

    This action amends Title 14, Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) 
part 71 by denoting the renaming of the airport from Myrtle Beach AFB, 
to Myrtle Beach International Airport, Myrtle Beach, SC. This action 
also adjusts the geographic coordinates of Myrtle Beach International 
Airport and Grand Strand Airport to coincide with the FAA's National 
Aeronautical Charting Office. There are no changes to the boundaries or 
altitudes within this airspace area.
    The FAA has determined that this regulation only involves an 
established body of technical regulations for which frequent and 
routine amendments are necessary to keep them operationally current. 
It, therefore, (1) Is not a ``significant regulatory action'' under 
Executive Order 12866; (2) is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT 
Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); 
and (3) does not warrant preparation of a Regulatory Evaluation as the 
anticipated impact is so minimal. Since this is a routine matter that 
will only affect air traffic procedures and air navigation, it is 
certified that this rule, when promulgated, will not have a significant 
economic impact on a substantial number of small entities under the 
criteria of the Regulatory Flexibility Act.
    The FAA's authority to issue rules regarding aviation safety is 
found in Title 49 of the U.S. Code. Subtitle 1, Section 106 describes 
the authority of the FAA Administrator. Subtitle VII, Aviation 
Programs, describes in more detail the scope of the agency's authority. 
This rulemaking is promulgated under the authority described in 
Subtitle VII, Part A, Subpart I, Section 40103. Under that section, the 
FAA is charged with prescribing regulations to assign the use of 
airspace necessary to ensure the safety of aircraft and the efficient 
use of airspace. This regulation in within the scope of that authority 
as it amends the airspace description for Myrtle Beach, SC, Class E 
airspace.
    Accordingly, since this action merely involves a change in the 
legal description of the Myrtle Beach, SC, Class E airspace area, and 
does not involve a change in the dimensions or operating requirements 
of that airspace, notice and public comment under 5 U.S.C. 553(b) are 
unnecessary.

Lists of Subjects in 14 CFR Part 71

    Airspace, Incorporation by reference, Navigation (air).

The Amendment

0
In consideration of the foregoing, the Federal Aviation Administration 
amends 14 CFR part 71 as follows:

PART 71--DESIGNATION OF CLASS A, B, C, D, AND E AIRSPACE AREAS; AIR 
TRAFFIC SERVICE ROUTES; AND REPORTING POINTS

0
1. The authority citation for part 71 continues to read as follows:

    Authority:  49 U.S.C. 106(g); 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 
24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389.


Sec.  71.1  [Amended]

0
2. The incorporation by reference in 14 CFR 71.1 of Federal Aviation 
Administration Order 7400.9T, Airspace Designations and Reporting 
Points, signed August 27, 2009, and effective September 15, 2009, is 
amended as follows:

Paragraph 6005 Class E Airspace Areas Extending Upward From 700 
Feet or More Above the Surface of the Earth.

* * * * *

ASO SC E5 Myrtle Beach, SC [Amended]

Myrtle Beach International Airport, SC
    (Lat. 33[deg]40'47'' N., Long. 78[deg]55'42'' W.)
North Myrtle Beach, Grand Strand Airport, SC
    (Lat. 33[deg]48'42'' N., Long. 78[deg]43'26'' W.)

    That airspace extending upward from 700 feet above the surface 
within a 7-mile radius of the Myrtle Beach International Airport and 
within an 8-mile radius of Grand Strand Airport.
* * * * *


[[Page 69272]]


    Issued in College Park, Georgia, on December 9, 2009.
Barry A. Knight,
Acting Manager, Operations Support Group, Eastern Service Center, Air 
Traffic Organization.
[FR Doc. E9-30288 Filed 12-30-09; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4910-13-P