Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, Alaska State Office, Anchorage, AK, and Public Museum of West Michigan, Grand Rapids, MI, 65141-65142 [E9-29291]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 74, No. 235 / Wednesday, December 9, 2009 / Notices WReier-Aviles on DSKGBLS3C1PROD with NOTICES Dated: November 9, 2009. David Tarler, Acting Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. E9–29299 Filed 12–9–09; 8:45 am] 1937 Alaskan cruise were recorded as collected from southeast Alaska. Based on this evidence, the museum considers the objects to have been removed from a location along the Alaska Steamship BILLING CODE 4312–50–S Company’s Seattle-Skagway-Sitka route in southeast Alaska. The museum consulted with the DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Sealaska Corporation regarding these unassociated funerary objects. In 1971, National Park Service the Sealaska Corporation was formed Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural under the Alaska Native Claims Items: Paul H. Karshner Memorial Settlement Act, and its shareholders Museum, Puyallup, WA include Native residents of southeast Alaska and Native people who AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. originated from southeast Alaska. ACTION: Notice. Southeast Alaska is within the traditional territory of the Tlingit and Notice is here given in accordance Haida Alaskan Native groups (De with the Native American Graves Laguna 1990: 203–228; Whorl Protection and Repatriation Act 1990:149–158 in Handbook of North (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent American Indians, Vol. 7, Northwest to repatriate cultural items in the Coast). Consultation evidence presented possession of the Paul H. Karshner by the Sealaska Corporation supports Memorial Museum, Puyallup, WA, that the use of Russian trade beads among meets the definition of ‘‘unassociated Alaskan Native Tlingit people as early funerary objects’’ under 25 U.S.C. 3001. as 1741, when the first contact between This notice is published as part of the Tlingit people and Russians occurred National Park Service’s administrative (Dauenhauer, 2008). The beads became responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 a symbol of wealth for Tlingit people U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations who owned them, and it was a common in this notice are the sole responsibility practice among the Tlingit to inter beads of the museum, institution, or Federal with their deceased. agency that has control of the cultural Officials of the Paul H. Karshner items. The National Park Service is not Memorial Museum have determined responsible for the determinations in that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(B), this notice. the two cultural items described above In 1937, two unassociated funerary are reasonably believed to have been objects were removed from a grave in placed with or near individual human Alaska, by Dr. Warner and Mrs. Ella remains at the time of death or later as Karshner while on a tourist cruise of part of the death rite or ceremony and southeast Alaska, and donated to the are believed, by a preponderance of the Paul H. Karshner Memorial Museum in evidence, to have been removed from a 1938 (Catalog No. 1938.01.1–71). The specific burial site of an Native objects are described in museum records American individual. Officials of the as, ‘‘2 strings of old Russian beads from Paul H. Karshner Memorial Museum an Alaskan grave. Probably used in also have determined that, pursuant to barter with Indians when Alaska 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a belonged to Russia.’’ The two necklaces relationship of shared group identity are composed of glass beads of various that can be reasonably traced between colors. One necklace has faceted blue the unassociated funerary objects and and round red beads (26’’ long); the the Sealaska Corporation. other necklace has blue, green, white, Representatives of any other Indian red, black, and yellow round beads (66’’ tribe that believes itself to be culturally long). affiliated with the unassociated funerary While there is no record of the exact objects should contact Dr. Jay Reifel, location the funerary objects were Assistant Superintendent, Puyallup obtained, the museum has a letter School District, telephone (253) 840– written by Mrs. Karshner describing the 8971, or Ms. Beth Bestrom, Curator, couple’s 1937 Alaskan cruise on the SS Paul H. Karshner Memorial Museum, Cordova, an Alaska Steamship Company 309 4th St. NE, Puyallup, WA 98372, (ASC) vessel. On their cruise, she noted telephone (253) 841–8748, before they stopped for two weeks at Klawock, January 8, 2010. Repatriation of the located on the west side of Prince of unassociated funerary objects to the Wales Island. A 1936 Alaska Steamship Sealaska Corporation may proceed after Company route map confirms Klawock that date if no additional claimants was a stop along their Seattle-Skagwaycome forward. The Paul H. Karshner Memorial Sitka route. All of the other items Museum is responsible for notifying the donated by the Karshners from their VerDate Nov<24>2008 15:02 Dec 08, 2009 Jkt 220001 PO 00000 Frm 00054 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 65141 Sealaska Corporation that this notice has been published. Dated: October 29, 2009. Richard C. Waldbauer, Acting Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. E9–29290 Filed 12–8–09; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, Alaska State Office, Anchorage, AK, and Public Museum of West Michigan, Grand Rapids, MI National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects in the control of the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, Alaska State Office, Anchorage, AK, and in the possession of the Public Museum of West Michigan (Grand Rapids Public Museum), Grand Rapids, MI. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from Amaknak Island, Aleutians East Borough, AK. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains and associated funerary objects was made by the Bureau of Land Management, Alaska State Office, and the Grand Rapids Public Museum professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Ounalashka Corporation and Qawalangin Tribe of Unalaska. In 1971, human remains representing a minimum of 15 individuals were removed from the Dutch Harbor Site on Amaknak Island, Aleutians East Borough, AK, during an expedition that was co-sponsored by the American Institute for Exploration, Western Michigan University, and the Public Museum of Grand Rapids. The expedition was directed by Western Michigan University faculty and Ted E:\FR\FM\09DEN1.SGM 09DEN1 WReier-Aviles on DSKGBLS3C1PROD with NOTICES 65142 Federal Register / Vol. 74, No. 235 / Wednesday, December 9, 2009 / Notices Banks, president of the American Institute for Exploration. No known individuals were identified. The 2,152 associated funerary are 131 hammer stones; 17 stone lamps; 1,184 stone flakes; 5 lithic cores; 49 lithic scrapers; 34 slate knives; 44 projectile points; 23 net sinkers; 203 fired cracked rocks; 25 stone abraders; 36 harpoon points; 169 bone tools; 1 bottle of whale amber; 1 quartz crystal; 1 channel coal fragment; 1 stone maul; 1 bone seal effigy; 1 stone effigy; 1 stone human effigy; 1 ground stone discoidal; 3 labrets; 1 bone fishhook; 205 bags of fish, shell, animal, and sea mammal bone; and 15 charcoal, wood, and soil samples. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from a 35–foot mound. This mound was the result of multiple dumping episodes from a succession of native villages. The funerary objects were found with the human remains and are consistent with other associated funerary objects reported from other locations in this region. The human remains and associated funerary objects have been determined to be prehistoric. Consultation with the Qawalangin Tribe of Unalaska, the Ounalashka Corporation, as well as academic expert opinions provided by the Alaska State Archaeologist and anthropology professors at the University of Alaska, are unanimous in identifying the current residents of Unalaska Island to be the descendants of the prehistoric people who occupied the site. Amaknak Island and the surrounding area have been inhabited for over 8,000 years by Aleut (Unangan) people. Based on geographic location, oral history and archeological evidence, the human remains and associated funerary objects from Amaknak Island are determined to be Native American and ancestors of members of the Ounalashka Corporation and Qawalangin Tribe of Unalaska. Officials of the Bureau of Land Management have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9–10), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of a minimum of 15 individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of the Bureau of Land Management have also determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(A), the 2,152 objects described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials of the Bureau of Land Management have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human VerDate Nov<24>2008 15:02 Dec 08, 2009 Jkt 220001 remains and associated funerary objects and the Ounalashka Corporation and Qawalangin Tribe of Unalaska. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary objects should contact Dr. Robert E. King, Alaska State NAGPRA Coordinator, Bureau of Land Management, 222 W. 7th Ave., Box 13, Anchorage, AK 99513–7599, telephone (907) 271–5510, before January 8, 2010. Repatriation of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Ounalashka Corporation and Qawalangin Tribe of Unalaska may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The Alaska State Office, Bureau of Land Management is responsible for notifying the Ounalashka Corporation and Qawalangin Tribe of Unalaska that this notice has been published. Dated: November 13, 2009. David Tarler, Acting Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. E9–29291 Filed 12–8–09; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Southwest Museum of the American Indian at the Autry National Center of the American West, Los Angeles, CA National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and an associated funerary object in the possession of the Southwest Museum of the American Indian at the Autry National Center of the American West, Los Angeles, CA. The human remains and associated funerary object were removed from either Inyo or Tulare County, CA. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary object. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Southwest Museum of the American Indian at the PO 00000 Frm 00055 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Autry National Center of the American West professional staff in consultation with representatives of the PaiuteShoshone Tribe of the Fallon Reservation and Colony, Nevada, which is representing the Great Basin InterTribal NAGPRA Coalition, a nonFederally recognized Indian coalition, consisting of the Inter-Tribal Council of Nevada, a non-Federally recognized Indian group, and the following Federally-recognized Indian tribes: Battle Mountain Shoshone Tribe (Constituent band of the Te-Moak Tribe of Western Shoshone Indians of Nevada); Bridgeport Paiute Indian Colony of California; Duckwater Shoshone Tribe of the Duckwater Reservation, Nevada; Ely Shoshone Tribe of Nevada; Las Vegas Tribe of Paiute Indians of the Las Vegas Indian Colony, Nevada; Lovelock Paiute Tribe of the Lovelock Indian Colony, Nevada; Moapa Band of Paiute Indians of the Moapa River Indian Reservation, Nevada; Paiute-Shoshone Indians of the Bishop Community of the Bishop Colony, California; Paiute-Shoshone Tribe of the Fallon Reservation and Colony, Nevada; Reno-Sparks Indian Colony, Nevada; Shoshone-Paiute Tribes of the Duck Valley Reservation, Nevada; South Fork Band (Constituent band of the Te-Moak Tribe of Western Shoshone Indians of Nevada); Susanville Indian Rancheria, California; Te-Moak Tribe of Western Shoshone Indians of Nevada; Washoe Tribe of Nevada and California; and Yomba Shoshone Tribe of the Yomba Reservation, Nevada. Additional tribes consulted were the Alturas Indian Rancheria, California; Big Pine Band of Owens Valley Paiute Shoshone; Burns Paiute Tribe; Cedarville Rancheria, California; Chemehuevi Indian Tribe of the Chemehuevi Reservation, California; Confederated Tribes of the Goshute Reservation, Nevada and Utah; Death Valley Timbi-Sha Shoshone Band of California; Elko Band (Constituent band of the Te-Moak Tribe of Western Shoshone Indians of Nevada); Fort Bidwell Indian Community of the Fort Bidwell Reservation of California; Fort Independence Indian Community of Paiute Indians of the Fort Independence Reservation, California; Fort McDermitt Paiute and Shoshone Tribes of the Fort McDermitt Indian Reservation, Nevada and Oregon; Kaibab Band of Paiute Indians of the Kaibab Indian Reservation, Arizona; Northwestern Band of the Shoshoni Nation of Utah (Washakie); Paiute Indian Tribe of Utah (Cedar Band of Paiutes, Kanosh Band of Paiutes, Koosharem Band of Paiutes, and Shivwits Band of Paiutes); Paiute- E:\FR\FM\09DEN1.SGM 09DEN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 74, Number 235 (Wednesday, December 9, 2009)]
[Notices]
[Pages 65141-65142]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: E9-29291]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service


Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of the Interior, 
Bureau of Land Management, Alaska State Office, Anchorage, AK, and 
Public Museum of West Michigan, Grand Rapids, MI

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

    Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves 
Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the 
completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary 
objects in the control of the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau 
of Land Management, Alaska State Office, Anchorage, AK, and in the 
possession of the Public Museum of West Michigan (Grand Rapids Public 
Museum), Grand Rapids, MI. The human remains and associated funerary 
objects were removed from Amaknak Island, Aleutians East Borough, AK.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). 
The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National 
Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains and associated funerary 
objects was made by the Bureau of Land Management, Alaska State Office, 
and the Grand Rapids Public Museum professional staff in consultation 
with representatives of the Ounalashka Corporation and Qawalangin Tribe 
of Unalaska.
    In 1971, human remains representing a minimum of 15 individuals 
were removed from the Dutch Harbor Site on Amaknak Island, Aleutians 
East Borough, AK, during an expedition that was co-sponsored by the 
American Institute for Exploration, Western Michigan University, and 
the Public Museum of Grand Rapids. The expedition was directed by 
Western Michigan University faculty and Ted

[[Page 65142]]

Banks, president of the American Institute for Exploration. No known 
individuals were identified. The 2,152 associated funerary are 131 
hammer stones; 17 stone lamps; 1,184 stone flakes; 5 lithic cores; 49 
lithic scrapers; 34 slate knives; 44 projectile points; 23 net sinkers; 
203 fired cracked rocks; 25 stone abraders; 36 harpoon points; 169 bone 
tools; 1 bottle of whale amber; 1 quartz crystal; 1 channel coal 
fragment; 1 stone maul; 1 bone seal effigy; 1 stone effigy; 1 stone 
human effigy; 1 ground stone discoidal; 3 labrets; 1 bone fishhook; 205 
bags of fish, shell, animal, and sea mammal bone; and 15 charcoal, 
wood, and soil samples.
    The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from 
a 35-foot mound. This mound was the result of multiple dumping episodes 
from a succession of native villages. The funerary objects were found 
with the human remains and are consistent with other associated 
funerary objects reported from other locations in this region. The 
human remains and associated funerary objects have been determined to 
be prehistoric.
    Consultation with the Qawalangin Tribe of Unalaska, the Ounalashka 
Corporation, as well as academic expert opinions provided by the Alaska 
State Archaeologist and anthropology professors at the University of 
Alaska, are unanimous in identifying the current residents of Unalaska 
Island to be the descendants of the prehistoric people who occupied the 
site. Amaknak Island and the surrounding area have been inhabited for 
over 8,000 years by Aleut (Unangan) people. Based on geographic 
location, oral history and archeological evidence, the human remains 
and associated funerary objects from Amaknak Island are determined to 
be Native American and ancestors of members of the Ounalashka 
Corporation and Qawalangin Tribe of Unalaska.
    Officials of the Bureau of Land Management have determined that, 
pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9-10), the human remains described above 
represent the physical remains of a minimum of 15 individuals of Native 
American ancestry. Officials of the Bureau of Land Management have also 
determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(A), the 2,152 objects 
described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or 
near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of 
the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials of the Bureau of Land 
Management have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there 
is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably 
traced between the Native American human remains and associated 
funerary objects and the Ounalashka Corporation and Qawalangin Tribe of 
Unalaska.
    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary 
objects should contact Dr. Robert E. King, Alaska State NAGPRA 
Coordinator, Bureau of Land Management, 222 W. 7th Ave., Box 13, 
Anchorage, AK 99513-7599, telephone (907) 271-5510, before January 8, 
2010. Repatriation of the human remains and associated funerary objects 
to the Ounalashka Corporation and Qawalangin Tribe of Unalaska may 
proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward.
    The Alaska State Office, Bureau of Land Management is responsible 
for notifying the Ounalashka Corporation and Qawalangin Tribe of 
Unalaska that this notice has been published.

    Dated: November 13, 2009.
David Tarler,
Acting Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. E9-29291 Filed 12-8-09; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-S