Notice of Inventory Completion: New York University College of Dentistry, New York City, NY, 32181-32182 [E9-16014]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 74, No. 128 / Tuesday, July 7, 2009 / Notices Permit No. TE–215889 Applicant: Santa Clara University, Santa Clara, California. The applicant requests a permit to take (survey, capture, mark, and recapture) the San Francisco garter snake (Thamnophis sirtalis) in conjunction with population monitoring and habitat quality/connectivity studies in Santa Clara County, California, for the purpose of enhancing its survival. We invite public review and comment on each of these recovery permit applications. Comments and materials we receive will be available for public inspection, by appointment, during normal business hours at the address listed in the ADDRESSES section of this notice. Dated: June 30, 2009. Michael Long, Acting Regional Director, Region 8, Sacramento, California. [FR Doc. E9–15913 Filed 7–6–09; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4310–55–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Bishop Museum, Honolulu, HI National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3005, of the intent to repatriate cultural items in the possession of the Bishop Museum, Honolulu, HI, that meet the definition of ‘‘unassociated funerary objects’’ under 25 U.S.C. 3001. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the cultural items. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. Five cultural items were collected from Kanupa Cave, South Kohala, HI, by J.S. Emerson and donated to the Bishop Museum in 1889, as part of the earliest of the Bishop Museum collections. The five unassociated funerary objects are three poi bowls, a wooden bowl and cover, and a fan. In 1939, nine cultural items were collected from Kanupa Cave, South Kohala, HI, by Kenneth Emory, a Bishop Museum staff member. The nine unassociated funerary objects are six VerDate Nov<24>2008 14:45 Jul 06, 2009 Jkt 217001 pieces of aha, hau and olona cordage, and three mat fragments. The cultural affiliation of the cultural items is established as being Native Hawaiian through Bishop Museum records and consultation with the Hawaii Island Burial Council, Hui Malama I Na Kupuna O Hawai’i Nei, and the Office of Hawaiian Affairs. Both Hui Malama I Na Kupuna O Hawai’i Nei and the Office of Hawaiian Affairs have requested repatriation of the unassociated funerary objects. Each qualifies as a Native Hawaiian organization under NAGPRA, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001(11), and each is entitled to claim and receive the unassociated funerary objects. Officials of the Bishop Museum have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(B), the 14 cultural items described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony and are believed, by a preponderance of the evidence, to have been removed from a specific burial site of a Native Hawaiian individual or individuals. Officials of the Bishop Museum also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the unassociated funerary objects and Hui Malama I Na Kupuna O Hawai’i Nei and the Office of Hawaiian Affairs. Both Hui Malama I Na Kupuna O Hawai’i Nei and the Office of Hawaiian Affairs have requested repatriation of the unassociated funerary objects, and officials of the Bishop Museum cannot determine by the preponderance of the evidence which requesting party is the most appropriate claimant. Consequently, pursuant to 43 CFR 10.10 (c)(2), the Bishop Museum will retain the unassociated funerary objects until Hui Malama I Na Kupuna O Hawai’i Nei and the Office of Hawaiian Affairs mutually agree upon the appropriate recipient or the dispute is otherwise resolved pursuant to NAGPRA or as ordered by a court of competent jurisdiction. Representatives of any other Native Hawaiian organization that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the unassociated funerary objects should contact Betty Lou Kam, Vice President Cultural Resources, Bishop Museum, 1525 Bernice Street, Honolulu, HI 96817, telephone (808) 848–4144, before August 6, 2009. Repatriation of the unassociated funerary objects to Hui Malama I Na Kupuna O Hawai’i Nei and the Office of Hawaiian Affairs may proceed after that date when the PO 00000 Frm 00078 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 32181 affiliated Native Hawaiian organizations have mutually agreed upon a resolution. Bishop Museum is responsible for notifying the Hawaii Island Burial Council, Hui Malama I Na Kupuna O Hawai’i Nei, and the Office of Hawaiian Affairs that this notice has been published. Dated: June 18, 2009 Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. E9–16023 Filed 7–6–09; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: New York University College of Dentistry, New York City, NY National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains in the possession of the New York University College of Dentistry, New York City, NY. The human remains were removed from Crab Creek Coulee, Grant County, WA. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by New York University College of Dentistry professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, Washington; Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Washington; and Wanapum Band, a non-Federally recognized Indian group. At an unknown date, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were removed from an unknown site on the Crab Creek Coulee, Grant County, WA, by Harlan Smith. At an unknown date, the human remains were acquired by C.B. Moore. In 1917, Mr. Moore donated the human remains to the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation. In 1956, the human remains were transferred to Dr. Theodore Kazamiroff, New York University College of Dentistry. No E:\FR\FM\07JYN1.SGM 07JYN1 32182 Federal Register / Vol. 74, No. 128 / Tuesday, July 7, 2009 / Notices known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. The Museum of the American Indian records list the locality of origin as Crab Creek Coulee, WA. The morphology of the human remains is consistent with Native American ancestry. The condition of the human remains suggests that they were removed from a Historic Period burial that probably dated to the 1800s. Tribal representatives identified Crab Creek, Grant County, WA, as part of the ancestral territory of both the Wanapum and Sinkayuse. Historic records from the early 19th century document Wanapum and Sinkayuse villages in Grant County. The northern boundary of the Wanapum extended to Crab Creek, while the southern edge of the Sinkayuse territory extended to Crab Creek. The extremities of the territories were defined by diffuse boundaries, and boundaries shifted according to who lived in or utilized land along the creek. At the time, the people living in the region did not organize themselves according to a tribe in the modern-day sense. Organization was along family, clan, and village lines. Trading and intermarriage were common between villages and groups. During the 19th century, some Wanapum became part of the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakima Nation, Washington, while others remained part of the staterecognized Wanapum Band that stayed in their ancestral territory. The Sinkayuse relocated among the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, Washington. Today, all three groups maintain close relations and coordinate repatriations for human remains from Grant County. Officials of New York University College of Dentistry have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9–10), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of one individual of Native American ancestry. Officials of New York University College of Dentistry also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, Washington; Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Washington; and the Wanapum Band, a non-Federally recognized Indian group. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Dr. Louis Terracio, New York University College of Dentistry, 345 East 24th St., New York, NY 10010, VerDate Nov<24>2008 14:45 Jul 06, 2009 Jkt 217001 telephone (212) 998–9917, before August 6, 2009. Repatriation of the human remains to the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, Washington; Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Washington; and the Wanapum Band, a non-Federally recognized Indian group, may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The New York University College of Dentistry is responsible for notifying the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, Washington; Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Washington; and Wanapum Band, a non-Federally recognized Indian group, that this notice has been published. Dated: June 15, 2009 Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. E9–16014 Filed 7–6–09; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Department of Anthropology Museum at the University of California, Davis, Davis, CA National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects in the possession of the Department of Anthropology Museum at the University of California, Davis, Davis, CA. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from Lake County, CA. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Department of Anthropology Museum at the University of California, Davis professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Cachil DeHe Band of Wintun Indians of the Colusa Indian Community of the Colusa Rancheria, California; Cortina Indian Rancheria of Wintun Indians of PO 00000 Frm 00079 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 California; and Rumsey Indian Rancheria of Wintun Indians of California. In 1971–1973, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were removed from CA– LAK–152 in Lake County, CA. Accompanying records indicate that the human remains were recovered by the Foundation for Archaeological Research during archeological excavations related to the construction of Indian Valley Reservoir by the Yolo County Flood Control and Water Conservation District. In 2006, the Yolo County Flood Control and Water Conservation District donated the Indian Valley archeological collection to the Department of Anthropology Museum at the University of California at Davis. No known individual was identified. The 71 associated funerary objects are 11 clamshell disk beads, 59 Olivella lipped and full lipped beads and bead fragments, and 1 obsidian biface. Based on burial context and site characteristics, the human remains described above from Lake County are determined to be Native American in origin. The presence of clamshell disk beads with the burial indicates that it dates to Phase 2 of the Late Period (approximately A.D. 1500–1790). Linguistic evidence indicates that the Patwin (Southern Wintun) moved southward from the vicinity of the California–Oregon border into the Sacramento Valley sometime around A.D. 0, and then spread into the surrounding foothills sometime before the beginning of Phase 2 of the Late Period. The archeological assemblage from CA–LAK–152 also indicates an occupation that is consistent with the ethnographic Patwin. Based on geographical location and age of the associated funerary objects, the human remains and associated funerary objects are culturally affiliated with descendants of the Patwin. In 1971–1973, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were removed from CA– LAK–153 in Lake County, CA. Accompanying records indicate that the human remains were recovered by the Foundation for Archaeological Research during archeological excavations related to the construction of Indian Valley Reservoir by the Yolo County Flood Control and Water Conservation District. In 2006, the Yolo County Flood Control and Water Conservation District donated the Indian Valley archeological collection to the Department of Anthropology Museum at the University of California at Davis. No known individual was identified. The 348 associated funerary objects are 39 clam E:\FR\FM\07JYN1.SGM 07JYN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 74, Number 128 (Tuesday, July 7, 2009)]
[Notices]
[Pages 32181-32182]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: E9-16014]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service


Notice of Inventory Completion: New York University College of 
Dentistry, New York City, NY

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

    Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves 
Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the 
completion of an inventory of human remains in the possession of the 
New York University College of Dentistry, New York City, NY. The human 
remains were removed from Crab Creek Coulee, Grant County, WA.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). 
The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible 
for the determinations in this notice.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by New York 
University College of Dentistry professional staff in consultation with 
representatives of the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, 
Washington; Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, 
Washington; and Wanapum Band, a non-Federally recognized Indian group.
    At an unknown date, human remains representing a minimum of one 
individual were removed from an unknown site on the Crab Creek Coulee, 
Grant County, WA, by Harlan Smith. At an unknown date, the human 
remains were acquired by C.B. Moore. In 1917, Mr. Moore donated the 
human remains to the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation. In 
1956, the human remains were transferred to Dr. Theodore Kazamiroff, 
New York University College of Dentistry. No

[[Page 32182]]

known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are 
present.
    The Museum of the American Indian records list the locality of 
origin as Crab Creek Coulee, WA. The morphology of the human remains is 
consistent with Native American ancestry. The condition of the human 
remains suggests that they were removed from a Historic Period burial 
that probably dated to the 1800s.
    Tribal representatives identified Crab Creek, Grant County, WA, as 
part of the ancestral territory of both the Wanapum and Sinkayuse. 
Historic records from the early 19th century document Wanapum and 
Sinkayuse villages in Grant County. The northern boundary of the 
Wanapum extended to Crab Creek, while the southern edge of the 
Sinkayuse territory extended to Crab Creek. The extremities of the 
territories were defined by diffuse boundaries, and boundaries shifted 
according to who lived in or utilized land along the creek. At the 
time, the people living in the region did not organize themselves 
according to a tribe in the modern-day sense. Organization was along 
family, clan, and village lines. Trading and intermarriage were common 
between villages and groups.
    During the 19th century, some Wanapum became part of the 
Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakima Nation, Washington, while 
others remained part of the state-recognized Wanapum Band that stayed 
in their ancestral territory. The Sinkayuse relocated among the 
Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, Washington. Today, all 
three groups maintain close relations and coordinate repatriations for 
human remains from Grant County.
    Officials of New York University College of Dentistry have 
determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9-10), the human remains 
described above represent the physical remains of one individual of 
Native American ancestry. Officials of New York University College of 
Dentistry also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), 
there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably 
traced between the Native American human remains and the Confederated 
Tribes of the Colville Reservation, Washington; Confederated Tribes and 
Bands of the Yakama Nation, Washington; and the Wanapum Band, a non-
Federally recognized Indian group.
    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Dr. 
Louis Terracio, New York University College of Dentistry, 345 East 24th 
St., New York, NY 10010, telephone (212) 998-9917, before August 6, 
2009. Repatriation of the human remains to the Confederated Tribes of 
the Colville Reservation, Washington; Confederated Tribes and Bands of 
the Yakama Nation, Washington; and the Wanapum Band, a non-Federally 
recognized Indian group, may proceed after that date if no additional 
claimants come forward.
    The New York University College of Dentistry is responsible for 
notifying the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, 
Washington; Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, 
Washington; and Wanapum Band, a non-Federally recognized Indian group, 
that this notice has been published.

    Dated: June 15, 2009
Sherry Hutt,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. E9-16014 Filed 7-6-09; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-S