Notice of Inventory Completion: Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL, 24873-24874 [E9-12289]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 74, No. 99 / Tuesday, May 26, 2009 / Notices (TTD) may call the Federal Information Relay Service (FIRS) at 1–800–877– 8330, 24 hours a day, seven days a week, to contact the Bureau of Land Management. Michael Bilancione, Land Transfer Resolution Specialist, Land Transfer Adjudication I. [FR Doc. E9–12052 Filed 5–22–09; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4310–JA–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service [FWS–R3–R–2009–N0023; 30136–1265– 0000–S3] Seney National Wildlife Refuge, Schoolcraft County, MI AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of availability: Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan and Finding of No Significant Impact for Environmental Assessment. We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), announce the availability of the Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) and Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the Environmental Assessment (EA) for Seney National Wildlife Refuge (NWR). Goals and objectives in the CCP describe how the agency intends to manage the refuge over the next 15 years. ADDRESSES: Copies of the Final CCP and FONSI/EA may be viewed at the Seney National Wildlife Refuge Headquarters or at public libraries near the refuge. You may access and download a copy via the Planning Web site at https:// www.fws.gov/midwest/Planning/Seney, or you may obtain a copy on compact disk by contacting: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Division of Conservation Planning, Bishop Henry Whipple Federal Building, 1 Federal Drive, Fort Snelling, MN 55111 (1–800– 247–1247, extension 5429), or Seney National Wildlife Refuge, 1674 Refuge Entrance Road, Seney, MI 49883 (906– 586–9851). A limited number of hardcopies will be available for distribution at the Refuge Headquarters. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Greg McClellan (906–586–9851). SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: SUMMARY: Introduction With this notice, we complete the CCP process for Seney NWR, which we began by publishing a notice of intent on April 21, 2006 (71 FR 20722). For more information about the initial process, see that notice. We released the VerDate Nov<24>2008 20:08 May 22, 2009 Jkt 217001 draft CCP and EA to the public, announcing and requesting comments in a notice of availability on September 3, 2008 (73 FR 51506). Seney NWR was established in 1935 by Executive Order under the Migratory Bird Conservation Act for the protection and production of migratory birds and other wildlife. The Refuge encompasses approximately 95,238 acres; 25,150 acres comprise the Seney Wilderness Area in which is contained the Strangmoor Bog National Natural Landmark. The Refuge is also responsible for the 33-acre Whitefish Point Unit, a former Coast Guard Station at Whitefish Point, in Chippewa County. The Draft CCP/EA was released for public review September 3, 2008; the comment period lasted 35 days ending October 8, 2008. During the comment period the Refuge hosted an open house event. By the conclusion of the comment period we received 14 written responses from organizations and individuals. In response to these comments we made a number of minor edits to the final document. Selected Alternative After considering the comments received, we have selected Alternative 2 (Management Gradients) for implementation. Under the selected alternative the Refuge will strive to manage its forests and water to allow unfettered succession to take place. Dynamic events such as windstorms, insect and tree disease outbreaks, and flooding and wildfire will play a more substantial role in shaping habitats. The major focus of the Refuge for the next 15 years will be on increasing biodiversity and regional resource conservation priority species habitat. The Refuge will be segmented into four general units with a management strategy tied to each unit. The units would follow a general gradient of management from low intensity (wilderness) to higher manipulation (managed impoundments and visitor use). The Refuge will also seek to increase wildlife-dependent public use opportunities. Background The National Wildlife Refuge System Administration Act of 1966, as amended by the National Wildlife Refuge System Improvement Act of 1997 (16 U.S.C. 668dd–668ee et seq.), requires the Service to develop a CCP for each National Wildlife Refuge. The purpose in developing a CCP is to provide refuge managers with a 15-year strategy for achieving refuge purposes and contributing toward the mission of the National Wildlife Refuge System, PO 00000 Frm 00105 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 24873 consistent with sound principles of fish and wildlife management, conservation, legal mandates, and Service policies. In addition to outlining broad management direction for conserving wildlife and their habitats, the CCP identifies wildlife-dependent recreational opportunities available to the public, including opportunities for hunting, fishing, wildlife observation and photography, and environmental education and interpretation. We will review and update the CCP at least every 15 years in accordance with the National Wildlife Refuge System Administration Act of 1966, as amended by the National Wildlife Refuge System Improvement Act of 1997, and the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (42 U.S.C. 4321– 4370d). Dated: March 12, 2009. Charles M. Wooley, Acting Regional Director, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Fort Snelling, Minnesota. [FR Doc. E9–12116 Filed 5–22–09; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4310–55–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains in the possession of the Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL. The human remains were removed from Aliulik Peninsula, Kodiak Island, AK. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Field Museum of Natural History professional staff in consultation with professional staff of the Alutiiq Museum and Archaeological Repository, Kodiak, AK, on behalf of Akhiok-Kaguyak, Inc.; Kaguyak Village; Koniag, Inc.; and Native Village of Akhiok. In 1950, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were E:\FR\FM\26MYN1.SGM 26MYN1 24874 Federal Register / Vol. 74, No. 99 / Tuesday, May 26, 2009 / Notices removed from the the Alitak Bay side of the Aliulik Peninsula, Kodiak Island, AK, by Arthur Freeman, who donated them to the Field Museum of Natural History in 1983 (Field Museum of Natural History accession number 3566, catalog number 242601). No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. The human remains have been identified as Native American based on specific cultural and geographic attributions in Field Museum of Natural History records. The records identify the human remains as ‘‘probably Koniag, Eskimo’’ from the ‘‘Alitak Bay side of Aliulik Peninsula (154W 56’ 50’’N), Kodiak, Alaska.’’ Koniag Eskimo - a term used by anthropologists to refer to both the late prehistoric and historic Native peoples of the Kodiak region are the ancestors of the contemporary Kodiak Alutiiq people. Specifically, the human remains are from an area of the Kodiak archipelago traditionally used by shareholders and citizens of AkhiokKaguyak, Inc.; Kaguyak Village; Koniag, Inc.; and Native Village of Akhiok. Officials of the Field Museum of Natural History have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9–10), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of one individual of Native American ancestry. Officials of the Field Museum of Natural History also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and Akhiok-Kaguyak, Inc.; Kaguyak Village; Koniag, Inc.; and Native Village of Akhiok. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Helen Robbins, Repatriation Director, Field Museum of Natural History, 1400 South Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, IL 60605–2496, telephone (312) 665–7317, before June 25, 2009. Repatriation of the human remains to Akhiok-Kaguyak, Inc.; Kaguyak Village; Koniag, Inc.; and Native Village of Akhiok may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The Field Museum of Natural History is responsible for notifying AkhiokKaguyak, Inc.; Kaguyak Village; Koniag, Inc.; and Native Village of Akhiok that this notice has been published. Dated: May 6, 2009 Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. E9–12289 Filed 5–22–09; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S VerDate Nov<24>2008 20:08 May 22, 2009 Jkt 217001 DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains in the possession of the Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL. The human remains were removed from Uyak Bay, Kodiak Island, AK. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Field Museum of Natural History professional staff in consultation with professional staff of the Alutiiq Museum and Archaeological Repository, Kodiak, AK, on behalf of Koniag, Inc. and Native Village of Larsen Bay. In 1967, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were removed from the vicinity of Uyak Bay, Kodiak Island, AK, by Kenneth G. McQuin, who donated them to the Field Museum of Natural History that same year (Field Museum of Natural History accession number 2983, catalog number 193459). No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. The human remains have been identified as Native American based on specific cultural and geographic attributions in Field Museum of Natural History records. The records identify the human remains as ‘‘Koniag Eskimo’’ from ‘‘Uyak Bay, Kodiak Island, Alaska.’’ Koniag Eskimo - a term used by anthropologists to refer to both the late prehistoric and historic Native peoples of the Kodiak region - are the ancestors of the contemporary Kodiak Alutiiq people. Specifically, the human remains are from an area of the Kodiak archipelago traditionally used by shareholders and citizens of Koniag, Inc. and Native Village of Larsen Bay. Officials of the Field Museum of Natural History have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9–10), the human remains described above PO 00000 Frm 00106 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 represent the physical remains of one individual of Native American ancestry. Officials of the Field Museum of Natural History also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and Koniag, Inc. and Native Village of Larsen Bay. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Helen Robbins, Repatriation Director, Field Museum of Natural History, 1400 South Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, IL 60605–2496, telephone (312) 665–7317, before June 25, 2009. Repatriation of the human remains to Koniag, Inc. and Native Village of Larsen Bay may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The Field Museum of Natural History is responsible for notifying Koniag, Inc. and Native Village of Larsen Bay that this notice has been published. Dated: May 6, 2009 Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. E9–12288 Filed 5–22–09; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Fort Vancouver National Historic Site, Vancouver, WA National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains in the possession and control of the U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Fort Vancouver National Historic Site, Vancouver, WA. The human remains were removed from Clark County, WA. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the superintendent, Fort Vancouver National Historic Site. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Fort Vancouver National Historic Site professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Confederated Tribes and Bands of E:\FR\FM\26MYN1.SGM 26MYN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 74, Number 99 (Tuesday, May 26, 2009)]
[Notices]
[Pages 24873-24874]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: E9-12289]


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service


Notice of Inventory Completion: Field Museum of Natural History, 
Chicago, IL

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

    Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves 
Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the 
completion of an inventory of human remains in the possession of the 
Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL. The human remains were 
removed from Aliulik Peninsula, Kodiak Island, AK.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). 
The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible 
for the determinations in this notice.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Field Museum 
of Natural History professional staff in consultation with professional 
staff of the Alutiiq Museum and Archaeological Repository, Kodiak, AK, 
on behalf of Akhiok-Kaguyak, Inc.; Kaguyak Village; Koniag, Inc.; and 
Native Village of Akhiok.
    In 1950, human remains representing a minimum of one individual 
were

[[Page 24874]]

removed from the the Alitak Bay side of the Aliulik Peninsula, Kodiak 
Island, AK, by Arthur Freeman, who donated them to the Field Museum of 
Natural History in 1983 (Field Museum of Natural History accession 
number 3566, catalog number 242601). No known individual was 
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    The human remains have been identified as Native American based on 
specific cultural and geographic attributions in Field Museum of 
Natural History records. The records identify the human remains as 
``probably Koniag, Eskimo'' from the ``Alitak Bay side of Aliulik 
Peninsula (154W 56' 50''N), Kodiak, Alaska.'' Koniag Eskimo - a term 
used by anthropologists to refer to both the late prehistoric and 
historic Native peoples of the Kodiak region - are the ancestors of the 
contemporary Kodiak Alutiiq people. Specifically, the human remains are 
from an area of the Kodiak archipelago traditionally used by 
shareholders and citizens of Akhiok-Kaguyak, Inc.; Kaguyak Village; 
Koniag, Inc.; and Native Village of Akhiok.
    Officials of the Field Museum of Natural History have determined 
that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9-10), the human remains described 
above represent the physical remains of one individual of Native 
American ancestry. Officials of the Field Museum of Natural History 
also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a 
relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced 
between the Native American human remains and Akhiok-Kaguyak, Inc.; 
Kaguyak Village; Koniag, Inc.; and Native Village of Akhiok.
    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Helen 
Robbins, Repatriation Director, Field Museum of Natural History, 1400 
South Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, IL 60605-2496, telephone (312) 665-
7317, before June 25, 2009. Repatriation of the human remains to 
Akhiok-Kaguyak, Inc.; Kaguyak Village; Koniag, Inc.; and Native Village 
of Akhiok may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come 
forward.
    The Field Museum of Natural History is responsible for notifying 
Akhiok-Kaguyak, Inc.; Kaguyak Village; Koniag, Inc.; and Native Village 
of Akhiok that this notice has been published.

    Dated: May 6, 2009
Sherry Hutt,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. E9-12289 Filed 5-22-09; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-S