Passenger Car Average Fuel Economy Standards-Model Years 2008-2020; Light Truck Average Fuel Economy Standards-Model Years 2008-2020; Request for Product Plan Information, 9185-9202 [E9-4449]

Download as PDF Federal Register / Vol. 74, No. 40 / Tuesday, March 3, 2009 / Proposed Rules Article 9. General Provisions 18 AAC 50.990. Definitions (effective 1/18/ 97) * * * * * [FR Doc. E9–4465 Filed 3–2–09; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 6560–50–P FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 [DA 08–2088; MB Docket No. 08–149; RM– 11475] Television Broadcasting Services; Columbus, GA Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Dismissal. rwilkins on PROD1PC63 with PROPOSALS AGENCY: SUMMARY: The Commission, at the request of petitioner Georgia Public Telecommunications Commission (‘‘GPTC’’), permittee of noncommercial educational station WJSP–DT, DTV channel *23, Columbus, Georgia, dismisses GPTC’s pending petition for rulemaking to substitute DTV channel *11 for post-transition DTV channel *23 at Columbus. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Adrienne Y. Denysyk, Media Bureau, (202) 418–1600. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: This is a synopsis of the Commission’s Order, MB Docket No. 08–149, adopted September 10, 2008, and released September 10, 2008. The full text of this document is available for public inspection and copying during normal business hours in the FCC’s Reference Information Center at Portals II, CY– A257, 445 12th Street, SW., Washington, DC 20554. This document will also be available via ECFS (http:// www.fcc.gov/cgb/ecfs/). (Documents will be available electronically in ASCII, Word 97, and/or Adobe Acrobat.) This document may be purchased from the Commission’s duplicating contractor, Best Copy and Printing, Inc., 445 12th Street, SW., Room CY–B402, Washington, DC 20554, telephone 1– 800–478–3160 or via e-mail http:// www.BCPIWEB.com. To request this document in accessible formats (computer diskettes, large print, audio recording, and Braille), send an e-mail to fcc504@fcc.gov or call the Commission’s Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau at (202) 418–0530 (voice), (202) 418–0432 (TTY). This document does not contain information collection requirements subject to the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, Public Law 104–13. In addition, VerDate Nov<24>2008 16:19 Mar 02, 2009 Jkt 217001 therefore, it does not contain any information collection burden ‘‘for small business concerns with fewer than 25 employees,’’ pursuant to the Small Business Paperwork Relief Act of 2002, Public Law 107–198, see 44 U.S.C. 3506(c)(4). Provisions of the Regulatory Flexibility Act of 1980 do not apply to this proceeding. This document is not subject to the Congressional Review Act. (The Commission, is, therefore, not required to submit a copy of this Order to the Government Accountability Office, pursuant to the Congressional Review Act, see 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A) since this proposed rule is dismissed, herein.) Federal Communications Commission. Clay C. Pendarvis, Associate Chief, Video Division, Media Bureau. [FR Doc. E9–4486 Filed 3–2–09; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 6712–01–P FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 [DA 09–409; MB Docket No. 08–233; RM– 11505] Television Broadcasting Services; Waco, TX AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Dismissal. SUMMARY: The Commission, at the request of petitioner Comcorp of Texas License Corp. (‘‘Comcorp’’), the permittee of post-transition DTV channel 44, Waco, Texas, dismisses Comcorp’s pending petition for rulemaking to substitute DTV channel 25 for post-transition DTV channel 44 at Waco. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Adrienne Y. Denysyk, Media Bureau, (202) 418–1600. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: This is a synopsis of the Commission’s Order, MB Docket No. 08–233, adopted February 19, 2009, and released February 20, 2009. The full text of this document is available for public inspection and copying during normal business hours in the FCC’s Reference Information Center at Portals II, CY– A257, 445 12th Street, SW., Washington, DC, 20554. This document will also be available via ECFS (http:// www.fcc.gov/cgb/ecfs/ ). (Documents will be available electronically in ASCII, Word 97, and/or Adobe Acrobat.) This document may be purchased from the Commission’s duplicating contractor, PO 00000 Frm 00008 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 9185 Best Copy and Printing, Inc., 445 12th Street, SW., Room CY-B402, Washington, DC 20554, telephone 1– 800–478–3160 or via e-mail http:// www.BCPIWEB.com. To request this document in accessible formats (computer diskettes, large print, audio recording, and Braille), send an e-mail to fcc504@fcc.gov or call the Commission’s Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau at (202) 418–0530 (voice), (202) 418–0432 (TTY). This document does not contain information collection requirements subject to the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, Public Law 104–13. In addition, therefore, it does not contain any information collection burden ‘‘for small business concerns with fewer than 25 employees,’’ pursuant to the Small Business Paperwork Relief Act of 2002, Public Law 107–198, see 44 U.S.C. 3506(c)(4). Provisions of the Regulatory Flexibility Act of 1980 do not apply to this proceeding. This document is not subject to the Congressional Review Act. (The Commission, is, therefore, not required to submit a copy of this Order to the Government Accountability Office, pursuant to the Congressional Review Act, see 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A) since this proposed rule is dismissed, herein.) Federal Communications Commission. Clay C. Pendarvis Associate Chief, Video Division, Media Bureau. [FR Doc. E9–4484 Filed 3–2–09; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 6712–01–P DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION National Highway Traffic Safety Administration 49 CFR Parts 531 and 533 [Docket No. NHTSA–2009–0042] Passenger Car Average Fuel Economy Standards—Model Years 2008–2020; Light Truck Average Fuel Economy Standards—Model Years 2008–2020; Request for Product Plan Information AGENCY: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Request for comments. SUMMARY: The purpose of this request for comments is to acquire new and updated information regarding vehicle manufacturers’ future product plans to assist the agency in assessing what corporate average fuel economy (CAFE) standards should be established for model years 2012 through 2016 E:\FR\FM\03MRP1.SGM 03MRP1 rwilkins on PROD1PC63 with PROPOSALS 9186 Federal Register / Vol. 74, No. 40 / Tuesday, March 3, 2009 / Proposed Rules passenger cars and light trucks. The establishment of those standards is required by the Energy Policy and Conservation Act, as amended by the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007, Public Law 110–140. DATES: Comments must be received on or before May 4, 2009. ADDRESSES: You may submit comments [identified by Docket No. NHTSA– 2009–0042] by any of the following methods: • Federal eRulemaking Portal: Go to http://www.regulations.gov. Follow the online instructions for submitting comments. Mail: Docket Management Facility, U.S. Department of Transportation, 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE., West Building Ground Floor, Room W12–140, Washington, DC 20590. • Hand Delivery or Courier: West Building Ground Floor, Room W12–140, 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE., between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. ET, Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. Telephone: 1–800–647–5527. • Fax: 202–493–2251 Instructions: All submissions must include the agency name and docket number for this proposed collection of information. Note that all comments received will be posted without change to http://www.regulations.gov, including any personal information provided. Please see the Privacy Act heading below. Privacy Act: Anyone is able to search the electronic form of all comments received into any of our dockets by the name of the individual submitting the comment (or signing the comment, if submitted on behalf of an association, business, labor union, etc.). You may review DOT’s complete Privacy Act Statement in the Federal Register published on April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477–78) or you may visit http:// www.dot.gov/privacy.html. Docket: For access to the docket to read background documents or comments received, go to http:// www.regulations.gov and follow the online instructions, or visit the Docket Management Facility at the street address listed above. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mr. Peter Feather, Fuel Economy Division Chief, Office of International Policy, Fuel economy and Consumer Programs, at (202) 366–0846, facsimile (202) 493– 2290, electronic mail peter.feather@dot.gov. For legal issues, call Ms. Rebecca Yoon, Office of the Chief Counsel, at (202) 366–2992. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: VerDate Nov<24>2008 16:19 Mar 02, 2009 Jkt 217001 I. Introduction NHTSA has been issuing Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards since the late 1970’s under the Energy Policy and Conservation Act (EPCA). The CAFE program conserves petroleum, a non-renewable energy source, saves consumers money, and promotes energy independence and security by reducing dependence on foreign oil. It also reduces carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from the tailpipes of new motor vehicles and thus climate change. The Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) amended EPCA by mandating that model year (MY) 2011– 2020 standards be set to ensure that the industry-wide average of all new passenger cars and light trucks, combined, is at least 35 miles per gallon (mpg) by MY 2020. This is a minimum requirement, as NHTSA must set standards at the maximum feasible level in each model year. NHTSA will determine, based on all of the relevant circumstances, whether that calls for establishing standards that reach the 35 mpg goal earlier than MY 2020. EISA also mandated that the CAFE standards be based on one or more vehicle attribute. For example, sizebased (i.e., size-indexed) standards assign higher fuel economy targets to smaller vehicles and lower ones to larger vehicles. The fleet wide average fuel economy that a particular manufacturer must achieve depends on the size mix of its fleet. This approach ensures that all manufacturers will be required to incorporate fuel-saving technologies across a broad range of their passenger car and light truck fleets. NHTSA proposed in April 2008 to begin implementing EISA by establishing CAFE standards for MYs 2011–2015. In a January 26, 2009 memorandum, the President requested NHTSA to divide its rulemaking into two parts. First, he requested that the agency issue a final rule adopting CAFE standards for MY 2011 only, and do so by March 30, 2009 in order to comply with EPCA, which requires that a final rule establishing fuel economy standards for a model year be adopted at least 18 months before the beginning of the model year (49 U.S.C. 32902(a)). The agency is working to issue a final rule for MY 2011 in accordance with that schedule. Second, the President requested that NHTSA establish standards for MY 2012 and later after considering the appropriate legal factors, the comments filed in response to the May 2008 proposal, the relevant technological and scientific considerations, and, to the PO 00000 Frm 00009 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 extent feasible, a forthcoming report by the National Academy of Sciences, mandated under section 107 of EISA, assessing the costs and effectiveness of existing and potential automotive technologies that can practicably used to improve fuel economy.1 To assist the agency in analyzing potential CAFE standards for MYs 2012 through 2016, NHTSA is requesting updated future product plans from vehicle manufacturers, as well as production data through the recent past, including data about engines and transmissions for MY 2008 through MY 2020 passenger cars and light trucks and the assumptions underlying those plans. NHTSA requests information for MYs 2008–2020 to aid NHTSA in developing a realistic forecast of the MY 2012–2016 vehicle market. Information regarding earlier model years may help the agency to better account for cumulative effects such as volume- and time-based reductions in costs, and also may help to reveal product mix and technology application trends during model years for which the agency is currently receiving actual CAFE compliance data. Information regarding later model years helps the agency gain a better understanding of how manufacturers’ plans through MY 2016 relate to their longer-term expectations regarding EISA requirements, market trends, and prospects for more advanced technologies (such as HCCI engines, and plug-in hybrid, electric, and fuel cell vehicles, among others). NHTSA will also consider information from model years before and after MYs 2012–2016 when reviewing manufacturers’ planned schedules for redesigning and freshening their products, in order to examine how manufacturers anticipate tying technology introduction to product design schedules. In addition, the agency is requesting information regarding manufacturers’ estimates of the future vehicle population, and fuel economy improvements and incremental costs attributed to technologies reflected in those plans. The request for information is detailed in appendices to this notice. NHTSA has also included a number of questions directed primarily toward vehicle manufacturers. They can be found in Appendix A to this notice. Answers to those questions will assist the agency in its analysis. Given the importance that responses to this request for comment may have in NHTSA’s upcoming CAFE rulemaking, 1 A copy of the President’s memorandum is available at http://www.whitehouse.gov/the_ press_office/The_Energy_Independence_and _Security_Act_of_2007/ (last accessed Feb. 13, 2009). E:\FR\FM\03MRP1.SGM 03MRP1 Federal Register / Vol. 74, No. 40 / Tuesday, March 3, 2009 / Proposed Rules rwilkins on PROD1PC63 with PROPOSALS either as part of the basis for the proposed standards or as an independent check on them, NHTSA intends to review carefully and critically all data provided by commenters. It is crucial that commenters fully respond to each question, particularly by providing information regarding the basis for technology costs and effectiveness estimates. Additionally, the agency notes that, in connection with recent deliberations regarding federal assistance to the industry, some manufacturers submitted short business plans to Congress in December 2008 2 and restructuring plans to the Treasury Department in February 2009,3 and that some statements in these plans suggest that manufacturers’ product plans may have changed considerably since NHTSA last received detailed confidential product plans in July 2008. In light of these statements, and in light of the current uncertainty surrounding the auto industry, NHTSA will closely review the product plans submitted in response to today’s request. We will carefully assess any significant apparent discrepancies between submitted product plans and manufacturers’ public statements. To facilitate the submission of comments and to help ensure the conformity of data received regarding manufacturers’ product plans from MY 2008 through MY 2020, NHTSA has developed spreadsheet templates for manufacturers’ use. The uniformity provided by these spreadsheets is intended to aid and expedite our review, integration, and analysis of the information provided. These templates are the agency’s strongly preferred format for data submittal, and can be found on the Volpe National Transportation Systems Center (Volpe Center) Web site at ftp:// ftpserver.volpe.dot.gov/pub/CAFE/ templates/ or can be requested from Mr. Peter Feather at peter.feather@dot.gov. The templates include an automated tool (i.e., a macro) that performs some auditing to identify missing or potentially erroneous entries. The appendices to this document also include sample tables that 2 Links to these business plans may be found at http://financialservices.house.gov/ autostabilization.html (last accessed February 13, 2008). 3 Chrysler’s submission to the Treasury Department is available at http://www.treasury.gov/ initiatives/eesa/agreements/auto-reports/ ChryslerRestructuringPlan.pdf (last accessed Feb. 19, 2009), and GM’s submission to the Treasury Department is available at http://www.treasury.gov/ initiatives/eesa/agreements/auto-reports/ GMRestructuringPlan.pdf (last accessed Feb. 19, 2009). VerDate Nov<24>2008 16:19 Mar 02, 2009 Jkt 217001 manufacturers may refer to when submitting their data to the agency. In addition, NHTSA would like to note that we will share the information submitted in response to this notice with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This sharing will facilitate our consideration of the appropriate factors to be used in establishing fuel economy standards for MY 2012 and beyond. We will ensure that confidential information that is shared is protected from disclosure in accordance with NHTSA’s practices in this area. II. Submission of Comments 9187 Will the Agency Consider Late Comments? We will consider all comments that Docket Management receives before the close of business on the comment closing date indicated above under DATES. Due to the time frame of the upcoming rulemaking, we will be very limited in our ability to consider comments filed after the comment closing date. If a comment is received too late for us to consider it in developing a final rule, we will consider that comment as an informal suggestion for future rulemaking action. How Do I Prepare and Submit Comments? How Can I Read the Comments Submitted by Other People? Comments should be submitted using the spreadsheet template described above. Please include the docket number of this document in your comments. Please submit two copies of your comments, including the attachments, to Docket Management at the address given above under ADDRESSES. Comments may also be submitted to the docket electronically by logging onto http:// www.regulations.gov. Click on ‘‘How to Use This Site’’ and then ‘‘User Tips’’ to obtain instructions for filing the document electronically. You may read the comments received by Docket Management at the address given above under ADDRESSES. The hours of the Docket are indicated above in the same location. You may also see the comments on the Internet. To read the comments on the Internet, take the following steps: (1) Go to http://www.regulations.gov. (2) On that page, in the field marked ‘‘search,’’ type in the docket number provided at the top of this document. (3) The next page will contain results for that docket number; it may help you to sort by ‘‘Date Posted: Oldest to Recent.’’ (4) On the results page, click on the desired comments. You may download the comments. However, since the comments are imaged documents, instead of word processing documents, the downloaded comments may not be word searchable. Please note that even after the comment closing date, we will continue to file relevant information in the Docket as it becomes available. Accordingly, we recommend that you periodically check the Docket for new material. Anyone is able to search the electronic form of all comments received into any of our dockets by the name of the individual submitting the comment (or signing the comment, if submitted on behalf of an association, business, labor union, etc.). You may review DOT’s complete Privacy Act Statement in the Federal Register published on April 11, 2000 (Volume 65, Number 70; Pages 19477–78) or you may visit http://www.dot.gov/ privacy.html. How Can I Be Sure That My Comments Were Received? If you wish Docket Management to notify you upon its receipt of your comments, enclose a self-addressed, stamped postcard in the envelope containing your comments. Upon receiving your comments, Docket Management will return the postcard by mail. How Do I Submit Confidential Business Information? If you wish to submit any information under a claim of confidentiality, you should submit three copies of your complete submission, including the information you claim to be confidential business information, to the Chief Counsel, NHTSA, at the address given above under FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT. In addition, you should submit a copy from which you have deleted the claimed confidential business information to the docket. When you send a comment containing information claimed to be confidential business information, you should include a cover letter setting forth the information specified in our confidential business information regulation. (49 CFR Part 512.) PO 00000 Frm 00010 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 Authority: 49 U.S.C. 32902; delegation of authority at 49 CFR 1.50. E:\FR\FM\03MRP1.SGM 03MRP1 9188 Federal Register / Vol. 74, No. 40 / Tuesday, March 3, 2009 / Proposed Rules Issued on: February 26, 2009. Stephen R. Kratzke, Associate Administrator for Rulemaking. rwilkins on PROD1PC63 with PROPOSALS Appendix A I. Definitions As used in these appendices— 1. ‘‘Automobile,’’ ‘‘fuel economy,’’ ‘‘manufacturer,’’ and ‘‘model year (MY),’’ have the meaning given them in Section 32901 of Chapter 329 of Title 49 of the United States Code, 49 U.S.C. 32901. 2. ‘‘Basic engine’’ has the meaning given in 40 CFR 600.002–93(a)(21). 3. ‘‘Cargo-carrying volume,’’ ‘‘gross vehicle weight rating’’ (GVWR), and ‘‘passengercarrying volume’’ are used as defined in 49 CFR 523.2. 4. ‘‘CARB’’ means California Air Resource Board. 5. ‘‘Domestically manufactured’’ is used as defined in Section 32904(b)(2) of Chapter 329, 49 U.S.C. 32904(b)(2). 6. ‘‘Footprint’’ means the product of average track width (measured in inches and rounded to the nearest tenth of an inch) times wheelbase (measured in inches and rounded to the nearest tenth of an inch) divided by 144 and then rounded to the nearest tenth of a square foot as described in 49 CFR Part 523.2. 7. ‘‘Light truck’’ means an automobile of the type described in 49 CFR Part 523.3 and 523.5. 8. A ‘‘model’’ of passenger car is a line, such as the Chevrolet Impala, Ford Fusion, Honda Accord, etc., which exists within a manufacturer’s fleet. 9. ‘‘Model Type’’ is used as defined in 40 CFR 600.002–93(a)(19). 10. ‘‘MY’’ means model year. 11. ‘‘Passenger car’’ means an automobile of the type described in 49 CFR Part 523.3 and 523.4. 12. ‘‘Percent fuel economy improvements’’ means that percentage which corresponds to the amount by which respondent could improve the fuel economy of vehicles in a given model or class through the application of a specified technology, averaged over all vehicles of that model or in that class which feasibly could use the technology. Projections of percent fuel economy improvement should be based on the assumption of maximum efforts by respondent to achieve the highest possible fuel economy increase through the application of the technology. The baseline for determination of percent fuel economy improvement is the level of technology and vehicle performance with respect to acceleration and gradeability for respondent’s 2008 model year passenger cars or light trucks in the equivalent class. 13. ‘‘Percent production implementation rate’’ means that percentage which corresponds to the maximum number of passenger cars or light trucks of a specified class, which could feasibly employ a given type of technology if respondent made maximum efforts to apply the technology by a specified model year. 14. ‘‘Production percentage’’ means the percent of respondent’s passenger cars or light trucks of a specified model projected to be manufactured in a specified model year. VerDate Nov<24>2008 16:19 Mar 02, 2009 Jkt 217001 15. ‘‘Project’’ or ‘‘projection’’ refers to the best estimates made by respondent, whether or not based on less than certain information. 16. ‘‘Redesign’’ means any change, or combination of changes, to a vehicle that would change its weight by 50 pounds or more or change its frontal area or aerodynamic drag coefficient by 2 percent or the implementation of new engine or transmission. 17. ‘‘Refresh’’ means any change, or combination of changes, to a vehicle that would change its weight by less than 50 pounds and would not change its frontal area or aerodynamic drag coefficient. 18. ‘‘Relating to’’ means constituting, defining, containing, explaining, embodying, reflecting, identifying, stating, referring to, dealing with, or in any way pertaining to. 19. ‘‘Respondent’’ means each manufacturer (including all its divisions) providing answers to the questions set forth in this appendix, and its officers, employees, agents or servants. 20. ‘‘RPE’’ means retail price equivalent. 21. ‘‘Test Weight’’ is used as defined in 40 CFR 86.082–2. 22. ‘‘Track Width’’ means the lateral distance between the centerlines of the base tires at ground, including the camber angle. 23. ‘‘Truckline’’ means the name assigned by the Environmental Protection Agency to a different group of vehicles within a make or car division in accordance with that agency’s 2001 model year pickup, van (cargo vans and passenger vans are considered separate truck lines), and special purpose vehicle criteria. 24. ‘‘Variants of existing engines’’ means versions of an existing basic engine that differ from that engine in terms of displacement, method of aspiration, induction system or that weigh at least 25 pounds more or less than that engine. 25. ‘‘Wheelbase’’ means the longitudinal distance between front and rear wheel centerlines. II. Assumptions All assumptions concerning emission standards, damageability regulations, safety standards, etc., should be listed and described in detail by the respondent. III. Specifications—Passenger Car and Light Truck Data Go to ftp://ftpserver.volpe.dot.gov/pub/ CAFE/templates/ for spreadsheet templates. 1. Identify all passenger car and light truck models offered for sale in MY 2008 whose production respondent projects discontinuing before MY 2011 and identify the last model year in which each will be offered. 2. Identify all basic engines offered by respondent in MY 2008 passenger cars and light trucks which respondent projects it will cease to offer for sale in passenger cars before MY 2011, and identify the last model year in which each will be offered. 3. For each model year 2008–2020, list all known or projected car and truck lines and provide the information specified below for each model type. Model types that are essentially identical except for their nameplates (e.g., Ford Fusion/Mercury Milan) may be combined into one item. PO 00000 Frm 00011 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 Engines having the same displacement but belonging to different engine families are to be grouped separately. Within the fleet, the vehicles are to be sorted first by car or truck line, second by basic engine, and third by transmission type. For each model type, a specific indexed engine and transmission are to be identified. As applicable, an indexed predecessor model type is also to be identified. Spreadsheet templates can be found at ftp://ftpserver.volpe.dot.gov/pub/ CAFE/templates/. These templates include codes and definitions for the data that the agency is seeking, including, but not limited to the following: A. General Information 1. Vehicle Number—a unique number assigned to each model. 2. Manufacturer—manufacturer’s name (e.g., Toyota). 3. Model—name of model (e.g., Camry). 4. Nameplate—vehicle nameplate (e.g., Camry Solara). 5. Primary Fuel—classified as CNG = compressed natural gas; D = diesel; E = electricity; E–85 = ethanol; E100 = neat ethanol; G = gasoline; H = hydrogen; LNG = liquefied natural gas; LPG = propane; M85 = methanol; M100 = neat methanol 6. Fuel Economy on Primary Fuel— measured in miles per gallon; laboratory fuel economy (weighted FTP+highway GEG, exclusive of any calculation under 49 U.S.C. 32905). 7. Secondary Fuel—classified as CNG = compressed natural gas; D = diesel; E = electricity; E–85 = ethanol; E100 = neat ethanol; G = gasoline; H = hydrogen; LNG = liquefied natural gas; LPG = propane; M85 = methanol; M100 = neat methanol. 8. Fuel Economy on Secondary Fuel— measured in miles per gallon; laboratory fuel economy (weighted FTP+highway GEG, exclusive of any calculation under 49 U.S.C. 32905). 9. Tertiary Fuel—classified as CNG = compressed natural gas; D = diesel; E = electricity; E–85 = ethanol; E100 = neat ethanol; G = gasoline; H = hydrogen; LNG = liquefied natural gas; LPG = propane; M85 = methanol; M100 = neat methanol 10. Fuel Economy on Tertiary Fuel— measured in miles per gallon; laboratory fuel economy (weighted FTP+highway GEG, exclusive of any calculation under 49 U.S.C. 32905). 11. CAFE Fuel Economy—measured in miles per gallon; laboratory fuel economy (weighted FTP+highway GEG, inclusive of any calculation under 49 U.S.C. 32905) 12. Engine Code—unique number assigned to each engine. A. Manufacturer—manufacturer’s name (e.g., General Motors, Ford, Toyota, Honda). B. Name—name of engine. C. Configuration—classified as V = Vshaped; I = inline; R = rotary, H = horizontally opposed (boxer). D. Primary Fuel—classified as CNG = compressed natural gas, D = diesel, E85 = ethanol, E100 = neat ethanol, G = gasoline, H = hydrogen, LNG = liquefied natural gas, LPG = propane, M85 = methanol, M100 = neat methanol. E. Secondary Fuel—classified as CNG = compressed natural gas, D = diesel, E85 = E:\FR\FM\03MRP1.SGM 03MRP1 rwilkins on PROD1PC63 with PROPOSALS Federal Register / Vol. 74, No. 40 / Tuesday, March 3, 2009 / Proposed Rules ethanol, E100 = neat ethanol, G = gasoline, H = hydrogen, LNG = liquefied natural gas, LPG = propane, M85 = methanol, M100 = neat methanol. F. Country of Origin—name of country where engine is manufactured. G. Engine Oil Viscosity—typical values as text include 0W20, 5W20, etc.; ratio between the applied shear stress and the rate of shear, which measures the resistance of flow of the engine oil (as per SAE Glossary of Automotive Terms). H. Cycle—combustion cycle of engine: classified as A = Atkinson, AM = Atkinson/ Miller, D = Diesel, M = Miller, O = Otto, OA = Otto/Atkinson. I. Air/Fuel Ratio—the weighted (FTP + highway) air/fuel ratio (mass); a number generally around 14.7. J. Fuel Delivery System—mechanism that delivers fuel to engine: classified as SGDI = stoichiometric gasoline direct injection; LBGDI = lean-burn gasoline direct injection; SFI = sequential fuel injection; MPFI = multipoint fuel injection; TBI = throttle body fuel injection; CRDI = common rail direct injection (diesel); UDI = unit injector direct injection (diesel). K. Aspiration—breathing or induction process of engine (as per SAE Automotive Dictionary); classified as NA = naturally aspirated, S = supercharged, T = turbocharged, T2 = twin turbocharged, T4 = quad-turbocharged, ST = supercharged and turbocharged. L. Valvetrain Design—design of the total mechanism from camshaft to valve of an engine that actuates the lifting and closing of a valve (as per SAE Glossary of Automotive Terms): classified as CVA = camless valve actuation, DOHC = dual overhead cam, OHV = overhead valve, SOHC = single overhead cam. M. Valve Actuation/Timing—valve opening and closing points in the operating cycle (as per SAE J604): classified as F = fixed, ICP = intake cam phasing, CCP = coupled cam phasing, DCP = dual cam phasing. N. Valve Lift—describes the manner in which the valve is raised during combustion (as per SAE Automotive Dictionary): classified as F = fixed, DVVL = discrete variable valve lift, CVVL = continuously variable valve lift. O. Cylinders—the number of engine cylinders: an integer equaling 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10 or 12. P. Valves/Cylinder—the number of valves per cylinder: an integer from 2 through 5. Q. Deactivation—presence of cylinder deactivation mechanism: classified as Y = cylinder deactivation applied; N = cylinder deactivation not applied. R. Displacement—total volume displaced by a piston in a single stroke multiplied by the number of cylinders; measured in liters. S. Compression Ratio (min)—typically a number between 8 and 11 (for fixed CR engines, should be identical to maximum CR). T. Compression Ratio (max)—typically a number between 8 and 20 (for fixed CR engines, should be identical to minimum CR). U. Max. Horsepower—the maximum power of the engine, measured as horsepower. VerDate Nov<24>2008 16:19 Mar 02, 2009 Jkt 217001 V. Max. Horsepower RPM—rpm at which maximum horsepower is achieved. W. Max. Torque—the maximum torque of the engine, measured as lb-ft. X. Max Torque RPM—rpm at which maximum torque is achieved. 13. Transmission Code—unique number assigned to each transmission. A. Manufacturer—manufacturer’s name (e.g., General Motors, Ford, Toyota, Honda). B. Name—name of transmission. C. Country of origin—where the transmission is manufactured. D. Type—type of transmission: classified as M = manual, A = automatic (torque converter), AMT = automated manual transmission (single clutch w/ torque interrupt), DCT = dual clutch transmission, CVT1 = belt or chain CVT, CVT2 = other CVT (e.g., toroidal), HEVT = hybrid/electric vehicle transmission (for a BISG or CISG type hybrid please define the actual transmission used, not HEVT). E. Clutch Type—type of clutch used in AMT or DCT type transmission: D = dry, W = wet. F. Number of Forward Gears—classified as an integer indicating the number of forward gears; ‘‘CVT’’ for a CVT type transmission; or ‘‘n/a’’ for an electric vehicle. G. Logic—indicates aggressivity of automatic shifting: classified as A = aggressive, C = conventional U.S. Provide rationale for selection in the transmission notes column. 14. Origin—classification (under CAFE program) as domestic or import: D = domestic, I = import. B. Production 1. Production—actual and projected U.S. production for MY 2008 to MY 2020 inclusive, measured in number of vehicles. 2. Percent of Production Regulated by CARB Standards—percent of production volume that will be regulated under CARB’s AB 1493 for MY 2008 to MY 2020 inclusive. C. MSRP—measured in dollars (2009); actual and projected average MSRP (sales-weighted, including options) for MY 2008 to MY 2020 inclusive. D. Vehicle Information 1. Subclass—for technology application purposes only and should not be confused with vehicle classification for regulatory purposes: classified as Subcompact, Subcompact Performance, Compact, Compact Performance, Midsize, Midsize Performance, Large, Large Performance, Minivan, Small LT, Midsize LT, Large LT; where LT = SUV/ Pickup/Van; use tables below, with example vehicles, to place vehicles into most appropriate subclass. Subclass Example vehicles Subcompact ... Chevy Aveo, Honda Civic. Subcompact Mazda Miata, Saturn Sky. Performance. Compact ......... Chevy Cobalt, Nissan Sentra and Altima. Compact PerAudi S4 Quattro, Mazda formance. RX8. Midsize ........... Chevy Camaro (V6), Toyota Camry, Honda Accord, Hyundai Azera. PO 00000 Frm 00012 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 Subclass Midsize Performance. Large .............. Large Performance. Minivans ......... Small SUV/ Pickup/Van. Midsize SUV/ Pickup/Van. Large SUV/ Pickup/Van. 9189 Example vehicles Chevy Corvette, Ford Mustang (V8), Nissan G37 Coupe. Audi A8, Cadillac CTS and DTS. Bentley Arnage, Daimler CL600. Dodge Caravan, Toyota Sienna. Ford Escape & Ranger, Nissan Rogue. Chevy Colorado, Jeep Wrangler 4-door, Volvo XC70, Toyota Tacoma. Chevy Silverado, Ford Econoline, Toyota Sequoia. 2. Style—classified as Convertible, Coupe, Hatchback, Sedan, Minivan, Pickup, Sport Utility, Van, Wagon. 3. Light Truck Indicator—an integer; a unique number(s) assigned to each vehicle which represents the design feature(s) that classify it as a light truck. classified as: (0) The vehicle neither has off-road design features (defined under 49 CFR 523.5(b) and described by numbers 1 and 2 below) nor has functional characteristics (defined under 49 CFR 523.5(a) and described by numbers 3 through 7 below) that would allow it to be properly classified as a light truck, thus the vehicle is properly classified as a passenger car. > An automobile capable of off-highway operation, as indicated by the fact that it: (1)(i) Has 4-wheel drive; or (ii) Is rated at more than 6,000 pounds gross vehicle weight; and (2) Has at least four of the following characteristics calculated when the automobile is at curb weight, on a level surface, with the front wheels parallel to the automobile’s longitudinal centerline, and the tires inflated to the manufacturer’s recommended pressure— (i) Approach angle of not less than 28 degrees. (ii) Breakover angle of not less than 14 degrees. (iii) Departure angle of not less than 20 degrees. (iv) Running clearance of not less than 20 centimeters. (v) Front and rear axle clearances of not less than 18 centimeters each. > An automobile designed to perform at least one of the following functions: (3) Transport more than 10 persons; (4) Provide temporary living quarters; (5) Transport property on an open bed; (6) Provide, as sold to the first retail purchaser, greater cargo-carrying than passenger-carrying volume, such as in a cargo van; if a vehicle is sold with a second-row seat, its cargo-carrying volume is determined with that seat installed, regardless of whether the manufacturer has described that seat as optional; or (7) Permit expanded use of the automobile for cargo-carrying purposes or other nonpassenger-carrying purposes through: (i) For non-passenger automobiles manufactured prior to model year 2012, the E:\FR\FM\03MRP1.SGM 03MRP1 rwilkins on PROD1PC63 with PROPOSALS 9190 Federal Register / Vol. 74, No. 40 / Tuesday, March 3, 2009 / Proposed Rules removal of seats by means installed for that purpose by the automobile’s manufacturer or with simple tools, such as screwdrivers and wrenches, so as to create a flat, floor level, surface extending from the forwardmost point of installation of those seats to the rear of the automobile’s interior; or (ii) For non-passenger automobiles manufactured in model year 2008 and beyond, for vehicles equipped with at least 3 rows of designated seating positions as standard equipment, permit expanded use of the automobile for cargo-carrying purposes or other nonpassenger-carrying purposes through the removal or stowing of foldable or pivoting seats so as to create a flat, leveled cargo surface extending from the forwardmost point of installation of those seats to the rear of the automobile’s interior. 4. Structure—classified as either L = Ladder or U = Unibody. 5. Drive—classified as A = all-wheel drive; F = front-wheel drive; R = rear-wheel-drive; 4 = 4-wheel drive 4. 6. Axle Ratio—ratio of the speed in revolutions per minute of the drive shaft to that of the drive wheels. 7. Length—measured in inches; defined per SAE J1100, L103 (Sept. 2005). 8. Width—measured in inches; defined per SAE J1100, W116 (Sept. 2005). 9. Wheelbase—measured to the nearest tenth of an inch; defined per SAE J1100, L101 (Sept. 2005), and clarified above. 10. Track Width (front)—measured to the nearest tenth of an inch; defined per SAE J1100, W101–1 (Sept. 2005), and clarified above. 11. Track Width (rear)—measured to the nearest tenth of an inch; defined per SAE J1100, W101–2 (Sept. 2005), and clarified above. 12. Footprint—the product of average track width (measured in inches and rounded to the nearest tenth of an inch) times wheelbase (measured in inches and rounded to the nearest tenth of an inch) divided by 144 and then rounded to the nearest tenth of a square foot; defined per 49 CFR 523.2. 13. Base Tire—the tire specified as standard equipment by a manufacturer on each vehicle configuration of a model type (e.g., 275/40R17). 14. Running Clearance—measured in centimeters, defined per 49 CFR 523.2. 15. Front Axle Clearance—measured in centimeters, defined per 49 CFR 523.2. 16. Rear Axle Clearance—measured in centimeters, defined per 49 CFR 523.2. 17. Approach Angle—measured in degrees, defined per 49 CFR 523.2. 18. Breakover Angle—measured in degrees, defined per 49 CFR 523.2. 19. Departure Angle—measured in degrees, defined per 49 CFR 523.2. 20. Curb Weight—total weight of vehicle including batteries, lubricants, and other expendable supplies but excluding the driver, passengers, and other payloads, measured in pounds; per SAE J1100 (Sept. 2005). 4 NHTSA considers ‘‘4-wheel drive’’ to refer only to vehicles that have selectable 2- and 4-wheel drive options, as opposed to all-wheel drive, which is not driver-selectable. VerDate Nov<24>2008 16:19 Mar 02, 2009 Jkt 217001 21. Test Weight—weight of vehicle as tested, including the driver, operator (if necessary), and all instrumentation (as per SAE J1263), measured in pounds. 22. GVWR—Gross Vehicle Weight Rating, as defined per 49 CFR 523.2 measured in pounds. 23. Towing Capacity (Maximum)— measured in pounds. 24. Payload—measured in pounds. 25. Cargo volume behind the front row— measured in cubic feet, defined per Table 28 of SAE J1100 (Sept. 2005). 26. Cargo volume behind the second row— measured in cubic feet, defined per Table 28 of SAE J1100 (Sept. 2005). 27. Cargo volume behind the third row— measured in cubic feet, defined per Table 28 of SAE J1100 (Sept. 2005). 28. Enclosed Volume—measured in cubic feet. 29. Passenger Volume—measured in cubic feet; the volume measured using SAE J1100 as per EPA Fuel Economy regulations (40 CFR 600.315–82, ‘‘Classes of Comparable Automobiles’’). This is the number that manufacturers calculate and submit to EPA. 30. Cargo Volume Index—defined per Table 28 of SAE J1100 (Sept. 2005). 31. Luggage Capacity—measured in cubic feet, defined per SAE J1100, V1 (Sept. 2005). 32. Seating (max)—number of usable seat belts before folding and removal of seats (where accomplished without special tools), provided in integer form. 33. Number of Standard Rows of Seating— number of rows of seats that each vehicle comes with as standard equipment provided in integer form (e.g., 1, 2 ,3, 4, or 5). 34. Frontal Area—a measure of the wind profile of the vehicle, typically calculated as the height times width of a vehicle body, e.g., 25 square feet. 35. Aerodynamic Drag Coefficient, Cd—a dimensionless coefficient that relates the motion resistance force created by the air drag over the entire surface of a moving vehicle to the force of dynamic air pressure acting only over the vehicle’s frontal area, e.g., 0.25. 36. Tire Rolling Resistance, Crr—a dimensionless coefficient that relates the motion resistance force due to tire energy losses (e.g., deflection, scrubbing, slip, and air drag) to a vehicle’s weight, e.g., 0.0012. 37. Fuel Capacity—measured in gallons of diesel fuel or gasoline; MJ (LHV) of other fuels (or chemical battery energy). 38. Electrical System Voltage—measured in volts, e.g., 12 volt, 42 volts 2005). 39. Power Steering—H = hydraulic; E = electric; EH = electro-hydraulic. 40. Percent of Production Volume Equipped with A/C. 41. A/C Refrigerant Type—e.g., HFC–134a, HFC–152a, CO2. 42. A/C Compressor Displacement— measured in cubic centimeters. 43. A/C CARB credit—measured in grams per mile, g/mile CO2 equivalent as reportable under California ARB’s AB 1493 Regulation. 44. N2O Emission Rate—measured in grams per mile, as reportable under California ARB’s AB 1493 Regulation. 45. CH4 Emission Rate—measured in grams per mile, as reportable under California ARB’s AB 1493 Regulation. PO 00000 Frm 00013 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 46. Estimated Total CARB Credits— measured in grams per mile, g/mile CO2 equivalent as reportable under California ARB’s AB 1493 Regulation. E. Hybridization/Electrification 1. Type of Hybrid/Electric vehicle— classified as MHEV = 12V micro hybrid, BISG = belt mounted integrated starter generator, CISG = crank mounted integrated starter generator, PSHEV = power-split hybrid, 2MHEV = 2-mode hybrid, PHEV = plug-in hybrid, EV = electric vehicle, H = hydraulic hybrid, P = pneumatic hybrid. 2. Voltage (volts) or, for hydraulic hybrids, pressure (psi). 3. Energy storage capacity—measured in MJ. 4. Electric Motor Power Rating—measured in hp or kW. 5. Battery type—classified as NiMH = Nickel Metal Hydride; Li-ion = Lithium Ion. 6. Battery Only Range (charge depleting PHEV)—measured in miles. 7. Maximum Battery Only Speed— measured in miles per hour; maximum speed at which a HEV can still operate solely on battery power measured on a flat road using the vehicle’s FTP weight and coefficients. 8. Percentage of braking energy recovered and stored over weighted FTP + highway drive cycle. 9. Percentage of maximum motive power provided by stored energy system. 10. Electrified Accessories—list of electrified accessories: classified as WP = water (coolant) pump, OP = oil pump, AC = air conditioner compressor. F. Energy Consumption 5—of total fuel energy (higher heating value) consumed over FTP and highway tests (each weighted as for items 5 and 6 above), shares attributable to the following loss mechanisms, such that the sum of the shares equals one. 1. System irreversibility governed by the Second Law of Thermodynamics. 2. Heat lost to the exhaust and coolant streams. 3. Engine friction (i.e., the part of mechanical efficiency lost to friction in such engine components as bearings and rods, as could be estimated from engine dynamometer test results). 4. Pumping losses (i.e., the part of mechanical efficiency lost to work done on gases inside the cylinder, as could be estimated from engine dynamometer test results). 5. Accessory losses (i.e., the part of fuel efficiency lost to work done by engine-driven accessories, as could be estimated from bench test results for the individual components). 6. Transmission losses (i.e., the part of driveline efficiency lost to friction in such transmission components as gears, bearings, and hydraulics, as could be estimated from chassis dynamometer test results). 7. Aerodynamic drag of the body, as could be estimated from coast-down test results. 5 This information is sought in order to account for a given vehicle model’s fuel economy as partitioned into nine energy loss mechanisms. The agency may use this information to estimate the extent to which a given technology reduces losses in each mechanism. E:\FR\FM\03MRP1.SGM 03MRP1 rwilkins on PROD1PC63 with PROPOSALS Federal Register / Vol. 74, No. 40 / Tuesday, March 3, 2009 / Proposed Rules 8. Rolling resistance in the tires, as could be estimated from coast-down test results. 9. Work done on the vehicle itself, as could be estimated from the vehicle’s inertia mass and the fuel economy driving cycles. G. Planning and Assembly 1. U.S. Content—overall percentage, by value, that originated in the U.S. 2. Canadian Content—overall percentage, by value, that originated in Canada. 3. Mexican Content—overall percentage, by value, that originated in Mexico. 4. Domestic Content—overall percentage, by value, that originated in the U.S, Canada and Mexico. 5. Final Assembly City. 6. Final Assembly State/Province (if applicable). 7. Final Assembly Country. 8. Predecessor—number (or name) of model upon which current model is based, if any. 9. Refresh Years—model years of most recent and future refreshes through the 2020 time period, e.g., 2010, 2015, 2020. 10. Redesign Years—model years of most recent and future redesigns through the 2020 time period, e.g., 2007, 2012, 2017; where redesign means any change or combination of changes to a vehicle that would change its weight by 50 pounds or more or change its frontal area or aerodynamic drag coefficient by 2 percent or more. 11. Employment Hours Per Vehicle— number of hours of U.S. labor applied per vehicle produced. H. The agency also requests that each manufacturer provide an estimate of its overall passenger car CAFE and light truck CAFE for each model year. This estimate should be included as an entry in the spreadsheets that are submitted to the agency. 4. As applicable, please explain in detail the relationship between the business plans submitted to Congress in December 2008, the restructuring plans submitted to the Treasury Department in February 2009, and the product plans being submitted in response to this request. 5. Relative to MY 2008 levels, for MYs 2008–2020 please provide information, by carline and as an average effect on a manufacturer’s entire passenger car fleet, and by truckline and as an average effect on a manufacturer’s entire light truck fleet, on the weight and/or fuel economy impacts of the following standards or equipment: A. Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS No. 208) Automatic Restraints. B. FMVSS No. 201 Occupant Protection in Interior Impact. C. Voluntary installation of safety equipment (e.g., antilock brakes). D. Environmental Protection Agency regulations. E. California Air Resources Board requirements. F. Other applicable motor vehicle regulations affecting fuel economy. 6. For each specific model year and model of respondent’s passenger car and light truck fleets projected to implement one or more of the following and/or any other weight reduction methods: VerDate Nov<24>2008 16:19 Mar 02, 2009 Jkt 217001 A. Substitution of materials. B. ‘‘Downsizing’’ of existing vehicle design, systems or components. C. Use of new vehicle, structural, system or component designs. Please provide the following information: (i) Description of the method (e.g., substituting an composite body panel for a steel panel); (ii) The weight reduction, in pounds, averaged over the model; (iii) The percent fuel economy improvement averaged over the model; (iv) The basis for your answer to (iii) (e.g., data from dynamometer tests conducted by respondent, engineering analysis, computer simulation, reports of test by others); (v) The incremental RPE cost (in 2009 dollars), averaged over the model, associated with the method; (vi) The percent production implementation rate and the reasons limiting the implementation rate. 7. For each specific model year and model of respondent’s passenger car and light truck fleets projected to implement one or more of the following and/or any other aerodynamic drag reduction methods: A. Revised exterior components (e.g., front fascia or side view mirrors). B. Addition of underbody panels. C. Vehicle design changes (e.g., change in ride height or optimized cooling flow path). Please provide the following information: (i) Description of the method/aerodynamic change; (ii) The percent reduction of the aerodynamic drag coefficient (Cd) and the Cd prior to the reduction, averaged over the model; (iii) The percent fuel economy improvement, averaged over the model; (iv) The basis for your answer to (iii) (e.g., data from dynamometer tests conducted by respondent, wind tunnel testing, engineering analysis, computer simulation, reports of test by others); (v) The incremental RPE cost (in 2009 dollars), averaged over the model, associated with the method/change; (vi) The percent production implementation rate and the reasons limiting the implementation rate. 8. Indicate any MY 2008–2020 passenger car and light truck model types that have higher average test weights than comparable MY 2007 model types. Describe the reasons for any weight increases (e.g., increased option content, less use of premium materials) and provide supporting justification. 9. Please provide your estimates of projected total industry U.S. passenger car sales and light truck sales, separately, for each model year from 2008 through 2020, inclusive. 10. Please provide your company’s assumptions for U.S. gasoline and diesel fuel prices during 2008 through 2020. 11. Please provide projected production capacity available for the North American market (at standard production rates) for each of your company’s passenger carline and light truckline designations during MYs 2008–2020. 12. Please provide your estimate of production lead-time for new models, your PO 00000 Frm 00014 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 9191 expected model life in years, and the number of years over which tooling costs are amortized. Additionally, the agency is requesting that manufactures provide vehicle or design changes that characterize a freshening and those changes that characterize a redesign. IV. Technologies, Cost and Potential Fuel Economy Improvements Spreadsheet templates for the tables mentioned in the following section can be found at ftp://ftpserver.volpe.dot.gov/pub/ cafe/templates/. 1. The agency requests that manufacturers, for each passenger car and light truck model projected to be manufactured by respondent between MY 2008–2020, provide the following information on new technology applications: (i) Description of the nature of the technological improvement; including the vehicle’s baseline technology that the technology replaces (e.g., 6-speed automatic transmission replacing a 4-speed automatic transmission); (ii) The percent fuel economy improvement averaged over the model; (iii) The basis for your answer to (ii) (e.g., data from dynamometer tests conducted by respondent, engineering analysis, computer simulation, reports of test by others); (iv) The incremental RPE cost (in 2009 dollars), averaged over the model, associated with implementing the new technology; (v) The percent production implementation rate and the reasons limiting the implementation rate. In regards to costs, the agency is requesting information on cost reductions available through learning effects that are anticipated, so information should be provided regarding what the learning effects are, when and at what production volumes they occur, and to what degrees such learning is expected to be available.6 The agency is also asking that the RPE markup factor (used to determine the RPE cost estimates) is stated in the response. 2. Additionally, the agency requests that manufactures and other interested parties provide the same information, as requested above, for the technologies listed in the following tables and any other potential technologies that may be implemented to improve fuel economy. These potential technologies can be inserted into additional rows at the end of each table. Examples of other potential technologies could include, but are not limited to: Homogenous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI), Electric 6 ‘‘Learning effects’’ describes the reduction in unit production costs as a function of accumulated production volume and small redesigns that reduce costs. Applying learning effects, or ‘‘learning curves,’’ requires estimates of three parameters: (1) The initial production volume that must be reached before cost reductions begin to be realized (referred to as ‘‘threshold volume’’); (2) the percent reduction in average unit cost that results from each successive doubling of cumulative production volume (usually referred to as the ‘‘learning rate’’); and (3) the initial cost of the technology. The method applies this effect for up to two doublings of production volume. For example, a 20 percent learning rate discount applied with a 300,000 unit threshold would reduce the applicable technology’s incremental cost by up to 36 percent. E:\FR\FM\03MRP1.SGM 03MRP1 9192 Federal Register / Vol. 74, No. 40 / Tuesday, March 3, 2009 / Proposed Rules Vehicle (EV), Fuel Cell Vehicle, Belt Mounted Integrated Starter Generator (BISG), and Crank Mounted Integrated Starter Generator (CISG) specific technologies. In an effort to standardize the information received the agency requests that if possible respondents fill in the following tables: Table IV–1 with estimates of the model year of availability for each technology listed and any other identified technology. Table IV–2 with estimated phase-in rates 7 by year for each technology listed and any other additional technologies. Engineering, planning and financial constraints can prohibit many technologies from being applied across an entire fleet of vehicles within a single model year, so the agency requests information on possible constraints on the rates at which each technology can penetrate a manufacturer’s fleet. Tables IV–3a, b and IV–4a, b with estimates for incremental RPE costs (in 2009 dollars) and incremental fuel consumption reductions for each technology listed and any other additional technologies. These estimates, for the technologies already listed, should assume that the preceding technologies, as defined by the decision trees in Appendix B, have already been applied and/or will be superseded. The agency is rwilkins on PROD1PC63 with PROPOSALS 7 In NHTSA’s 2006 rulemaking establishing CAFE standards for MY 2008–2011 light trucks, the agency considered phase-in caps by ceasing to add a given technology to a manufacturer’s fleet in a specific model year once it has increased the corresponding penetration rate by at least the amount of the cap. Having done so, it applied other technologies in lieu of the ‘‘capped’’ technology. VerDate Nov<24>2008 16:19 Mar 02, 2009 Jkt 217001 requesting that respondents fill in incremental RPE costs and fuel consumption reductions estimates for all vehicle subclasses listed. If a respondent feels that the incremental RPE cost and fuel consumption reduction estimates are similar for different subclasses they may combine subclasses. Table IV–5 with estimates for the percentage by which each technology reduces energy losses attributable to each of nine energy loss mechanisms. Tables IV–6a, b with estimates for synergies 8 that can occur when multiple technologies are applied. 3. The agency also asks that manufacturers or other interested parties provide information on appropriate sequencing of technologies, so that accumulated cost and 8When two or more technologies are added to a particular vehicle model to improve its fuel efficiency, the resultant fuel consumption reduction may sometimes be higher or lower than the product of the individual effectiveness values for those items. This may occur because one or more technologies applied to the same vehicle partially address the same source or sources of engine or vehicle losses. Alternately, this effect may be seen when one technology shifts the engine operating points, and therefore increases or reduces the fuel consumption reduction achieved by another technology or set of technologies. The difference between the observed fuel consumption reduction associated with a set of technologies and the product of the individual effectiveness values in that set is sometimes referred to as a ‘‘synergy.’’ Synergies may be positive (increased fuel consumption reduction compared to the product of the individual effects) or negative (decreased fuel consumption reduction). PO 00000 Frm 00015 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 fuel consumption effects may be evaluated incrementally. As examples of possible technology sequences, ‘‘decision trees’’ are shown in Appendix B below. 4. For each new or redesigned vehicle identified in response to Question III–3 and each new engine or fuel economy improvement identified in your response to Questions IV–1 and IV–2 provide your best estimate of the following, in terms of constant 2009 dollars: A. Total capital costs required to implement the new/redesigned model or improvement according to the implementation schedules specified in your response. Subdivide the capital costs into tooling, facilities, launch, and engineering costs. B. The maximum production capacity, expressed in units of capacity per year, associated with the capital expenditure in (A) above. Specify the number of production shifts on which your response is based and define ‘‘maximum capacity’’ as used in your answer. C. The actual capacity that is planned to be used each year for each new/redesigned model or fuel economy improvement. D. The increase in variable costs per affected unit, based on the production volume specified in (B) above. E. The equivalent retail price increase per affected vehicle for each new/redesigned model or improvement. Provide an example describing methodology used to determine the equivalent retail price increase. BILLING CODE 4910–59–P E:\FR\FM\03MRP1.SGM 03MRP1 VerDate Nov<24>2008 16:19 Mar 02, 2009 Jkt 217001 PO 00000 Frm 00016 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4725 E:\FR\FM\03MRP1.SGM 03MRP1 9193 EP03MR09.000</GPH> rwilkins on PROD1PC63 with PROPOSALS Federal Register / Vol. 74, No. 40 / Tuesday, March 3, 2009 / Proposed Rules VerDate Nov<24>2008 Federal Register / Vol. 74, No. 40 / Tuesday, March 3, 2009 / Proposed Rules 16:19 Mar 02, 2009 Jkt 217001 PO 00000 Frm 00017 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4725 E:\FR\FM\03MRP1.SGM 03MRP1 EP03MR09.001</GPH> rwilkins on PROD1PC63 with PROPOSALS 9194 EP03MR09.003</GPH> 9195 VerDate Nov<24>2008 16:19 Mar 02, 2009 Jkt 217001 PO 00000 Frm 00018 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4725 E:\FR\FM\03MRP1.SGM 03MRP1 EP03MR09.002</GPH> rwilkins on PROD1PC63 with PROPOSALS Federal Register / Vol. 74, No. 40 / Tuesday, March 3, 2009 / Proposed Rules EP03MR09.005</GPH> Federal Register / Vol. 74, No. 40 / Tuesday, March 3, 2009 / Proposed Rules VerDate Nov<24>2008 16:19 Mar 02, 2009 Jkt 217001 PO 00000 Frm 00019 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4725 E:\FR\FM\03MRP1.SGM 03MRP1 EP03MR09.004</GPH> rwilkins on PROD1PC63 with PROPOSALS 9196 VerDate Nov<24>2008 16:19 Mar 02, 2009 Jkt 217001 PO 00000 Frm 00020 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4725 E:\FR\FM\03MRP1.SGM 03MRP1 9197 EP03MR09.006</GPH> rwilkins on PROD1PC63 with PROPOSALS Federal Register / Vol. 74, No. 40 / Tuesday, March 3, 2009 / Proposed Rules VerDate Nov<24>2008 Federal Register / Vol. 74, No. 40 / Tuesday, March 3, 2009 / Proposed Rules 16:19 Mar 02, 2009 Jkt 217001 PO 00000 Frm 00021 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4725 E:\FR\FM\03MRP1.SGM 03MRP1 EP03MR09.007</GPH> rwilkins on PROD1PC63 with PROPOSALS 9198 VerDate Nov<24>2008 16:19 Mar 02, 2009 Jkt 217001 PO 00000 Frm 00022 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4725 E:\FR\FM\03MRP1.SGM 03MRP1 9199 EP03MR09.008</GPH> rwilkins on PROD1PC63 with PROPOSALS Federal Register / Vol. 74, No. 40 / Tuesday, March 3, 2009 / Proposed Rules VerDate Nov<24>2008 Federal Register / Vol. 74, No. 40 / Tuesday, March 3, 2009 / Proposed Rules 16:19 Mar 02, 2009 Jkt 217001 PO 00000 Frm 00023 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4725 E:\FR\FM\03MRP1.SGM 03MRP1 EP03MR09.009</GPH> rwilkins on PROD1PC63 with PROPOSALS 9200 EP03MR09.011</GPH> 9201 VerDate Nov<24>2008 16:19 Mar 02, 2009 Jkt 217001 PO 00000 Frm 00024 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 E:\FR\FM\03MRP1.SGM 03MRP1 EP03MR09.010</GPH> rwilkins on PROD1PC63 with PROPOSALS Federal Register / Vol. 74, No. 40 / Tuesday, March 3, 2009 / Proposed Rules 9202 Federal Register / Vol. 74, No. 40 / Tuesday, March 3, 2009 / Proposed Rules [FR Doc. E9–4449 Filed 2–26–09; 4:15 pm] BILLING CODE 4910–59–C DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION National Highway Traffic Safety Administration 49 CFR Part 571 [Docket No. NHTSA–2009–0038] RIN 2127–AK44 Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard; Air Brake Systems rwilkins on PROD1PC63 with PROPOSALS AGENCY: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM). SUMMARY: This document proposes to extend by 18 months a requirement that trailers with antilock brake systems be equipped with an external antilock malfunction indicator lamp. It also considers making the requirement permanent. The indicator lamp requirement, which is included in the Federal motor vehicle safety standard that governs vehicles equipped with air brakes, was originally scheduled to sunset on March 1, 2009, but has been extended to September 1, 2009 in an interim final rule published in today’s Federal Register. Under our proposal, the sunset date would be extended until March 1, 2011. This rulemaking is in response to a petition from the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance (CVSA), which has asked that this requirement be made permanent. Extending the sunset date for an additional 18 months would enable the agency to fully analyze CVSA’s request that the requirement be made permanent, and avoid a potential confusing time gap in the vehicles subject to the requirement. DATES: You should submit your comments early enough to ensure that the Docket receives them not later than April 2, 2009. Comments may be combined with ones on the accompanying interim final rule, which is being published today using the same docket number. ADDRESSES: You may submit comments to the docket number identified in the heading of this document by any of the following methods: • Federal eRulemaking Portal: Go to http://www.regulations.gov. Follow the online instructions for submitting comments. • Mail: Docket Management Facility: U.S. Department of Transportation, 1200 VerDate Nov<24>2008 16:19 Mar 02, 2009 Jkt 217001 New Jersey Avenue, SE., West Building Ground Floor, Room W12–140, Washington, DC 20590–0001. • Hand Delivery or Courier: 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE., West Building Ground Floor, Room W12–140, between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. ET, Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. • Fax: 202–493–2251. Instructions: For detailed instructions on submitting comments and additional information on the rulemaking process, see the Public Participation heading of the SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION section of this document. Note that all comments received will be posted without change to http:// www.regulations.gov, including any personal information provided. Please see the Privacy Act heading below. Privacy Act: Anyone is able to search the electronic form of all comments received into any of our dockets by the name of the individual submitting the comment (or signing the comment, if submitted on behalf of an association, business, labor union, etc.). You may review DOT’s complete Privacy Act Statement in the Federal Register published on April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477–78) or you may visit http:// DocketInfo.dot.gov. Docket: For access to the docket to read background documents or comments received, go to http:// www.regulations.gov. or the street address listed above. Follow the online instructions for accessing the dockets. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: For non-legal issues, you may call Mr. George Soodoo, Office of Crash Avoidance Standards (Phone: 202–366– 4931; FAX: 202–366–7002). For legal issues, you may call Mr. Ari Scott, Office of the Chief Counsel (Phone: 202– 366–2992; FAX: 202–366–3820). You may send mail to these officials at: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE., Washington, DC 20590. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Table of Contents I. Background II. Summary of the CVSA Petitions III. Agency Analysis and Proposal IV. Shortened Comment Period V. Public Participation VI. Rulemaking Analyses and Notices I. Background The final rule requiring antilock brake systems (ABS) on truck tractors, other air-braked heavy vehicles including trailers, and hydraulic-braked trucks was published in the Federal Register (60 FR 13216) on March 10, 1995. As amended by that final rule, FMVSS No. 121, Air Brake Systems, required two PO 00000 Frm 00025 Fmt 4702 Sfmt 4702 separate in-cab ABS malfunction indicator lamps for each truck tractor, one for the tractor’s ABS (effective March 1, 1997) and the other for the trailer’s ABS (effective March 1, 2001). The final rule also required air-braked trailers to be equipped with an externally mounted ABS malfunction lamp (effective March 1, 1998) so that the driver of a non-ABS equipped tractor or a pre-2001 ABS-equipped tractor towing an ABS-equipped trailer would be alerted in the event of a malfunction in the trailer ABS. The requirement for the trailermounted ABS malfunction indicator lamp was originally scheduled to expire on March 1, 2009. The agency established this sunset date in light of the fact that, after this eight-year period, many of the pre-2001 tractors without the dedicated trailer ABS malfunction indicator lamp would no longer be in long-haul service. The agency based its decision on the belief that the typical tractor life was five to seven years, and therefore decided on an eight-year period for the external ABS malfunction indicator lamp requirement. We further stated our belief that there would be no need for a redundant ABS malfunction lamp mounted on the trailer after the vast majority of tractors were equipped with an in-cab ABS malfunction indicator lamp for the trailer. II. Summary of the CVSA Petitions CVSA is an international not-forprofit organization comprised of local, state, provincial, territorial and federal motor carrier safety officials and industry representatives from the United States, Canada, and Mexico. The CVSA promotes commercial vehicle safety and sponsors vehicle inspections by partnering with the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration, Canadian Council of Motor Transport Administrators, Transport Canada, and the Secretariat of Communications and Transportation (Mexico). On October 22, 2007, CVSA petitioned the National Highway Traffic safety Administration (NHTSA) to amend FMVSS No. 121, Air Brake Systems, to make the requirement for the external antilock malfunction indicator lamp permanent instead of allowing it to expire, as originally intended, on March 1, 2009 (and is subsequently being modified to September 1, 2009, by an accompanying interim final rule). CVSA included in its petition suggested regulatory text along with its rationale for why the extension should be permanent. Since receiving the petition, the agency has received E:\FR\FM\03MRP1.SGM 03MRP1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 74, Number 40 (Tuesday, March 3, 2009)]
[Proposed Rules]
[Pages 9185-9202]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: E9-4449]


=======================================================================
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DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration

49 CFR Parts 531 and 533

[Docket No. NHTSA-2009-0042]


Passenger Car Average Fuel Economy Standards--Model Years 2008-
2020; Light Truck Average Fuel Economy Standards--Model Years 2008-
2020; Request for Product Plan Information

AGENCY: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), 
Department of Transportation (DOT).

ACTION: Request for comments.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: The purpose of this request for comments is to acquire new and 
updated information regarding vehicle manufacturers' future product 
plans to assist the agency in assessing what corporate average fuel 
economy (CAFE) standards should be established for model years 2012 
through 2016

[[Page 9186]]

passenger cars and light trucks. The establishment of those standards 
is required by the Energy Policy and Conservation Act, as amended by 
the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007, Public Law 
110-140.

DATES: Comments must be received on or before May 4, 2009.

ADDRESSES: You may submit comments [identified by Docket No. NHTSA-
2009-0042] by any of the following methods:
     Federal eRulemaking Portal: Go to http://
www.regulations.gov. Follow the online instructions for submitting 
comments.
    Mail: Docket Management Facility, U.S. Department of 
Transportation, 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE., West Building Ground 
Floor, Room W12-140, Washington, DC 20590.
     Hand Delivery or Courier: West Building Ground Floor, Room 
W12-140, 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE., between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. ET, 
Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays. Telephone: 1-800-647-
5527.
     Fax: 202-493-2251
    Instructions: All submissions must include the agency name and 
docket number for this proposed collection of information. Note that 
all comments received will be posted without change to http://
www.regulations.gov, including any personal information provided. 
Please see the Privacy Act heading below.
    Privacy Act: Anyone is able to search the electronic form of all 
comments received into any of our dockets by the name of the individual 
submitting the comment (or signing the comment, if submitted on behalf 
of an association, business, labor union, etc.). You may review DOT's 
complete Privacy Act Statement in the Federal Register published on 
April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477-78) or you may visit http://www.dot.gov/
privacy.html.
    Docket: For access to the docket to read background documents or 
comments received, go to http://www.regulations.gov and follow the 
online instructions, or visit the Docket Management Facility at the 
street address listed above.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mr. Peter Feather, Fuel Economy 
Division Chief, Office of International Policy, Fuel economy and 
Consumer Programs, at (202) 366-0846, facsimile (202) 493-2290, 
electronic mail peter.feather@dot.gov. For legal issues, call Ms. 
Rebecca Yoon, Office of the Chief Counsel, at (202) 366-2992.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

I. Introduction

    NHTSA has been issuing Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) 
standards since the late 1970's under the Energy Policy and 
Conservation Act (EPCA). The CAFE program conserves petroleum, a non-
renewable energy source, saves consumers money, and promotes energy 
independence and security by reducing dependence on foreign oil. It 
also reduces carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from the 
tailpipes of new motor vehicles and thus climate change.
    The Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) amended EPCA by 
mandating that model year (MY) 2011-2020 standards be set to ensure 
that the industry-wide average of all new passenger cars and light 
trucks, combined, is at least 35 miles per gallon (mpg) by MY 2020. 
This is a minimum requirement, as NHTSA must set standards at the 
maximum feasible level in each model year. NHTSA will determine, based 
on all of the relevant circumstances, whether that calls for 
establishing standards that reach the 35 mpg goal earlier than MY 2020.
    EISA also mandated that the CAFE standards be based on one or more 
vehicle attribute. For example, size-based (i.e., size-indexed) 
standards assign higher fuel economy targets to smaller vehicles and 
lower ones to larger vehicles. The fleet wide average fuel economy that 
a particular manufacturer must achieve depends on the size mix of its 
fleet. This approach ensures that all manufacturers will be required to 
incorporate fuel-saving technologies across a broad range of their 
passenger car and light truck fleets.
    NHTSA proposed in April 2008 to begin implementing EISA by 
establishing CAFE standards for MYs 2011-2015. In a January 26, 2009 
memorandum, the President requested NHTSA to divide its rulemaking into 
two parts. First, he requested that the agency issue a final rule 
adopting CAFE standards for MY 2011 only, and do so by March 30, 2009 
in order to comply with EPCA, which requires that a final rule 
establishing fuel economy standards for a model year be adopted at 
least 18 months before the beginning of the model year (49 U.S.C. 
32902(a)). The agency is working to issue a final rule for MY 2011 in 
accordance with that schedule.
    Second, the President requested that NHTSA establish standards for 
MY 2012 and later after considering the appropriate legal factors, the 
comments filed in response to the May 2008 proposal, the relevant 
technological and scientific considerations, and, to the extent 
feasible, a forthcoming report by the National Academy of Sciences, 
mandated under section 107 of EISA, assessing the costs and 
effectiveness of existing and potential automotive technologies that 
can practicably used to improve fuel economy.\1\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \1\ A copy of the President's memorandum is available at http://
www.whitehouse.gov/the_press_office/The_Energy_Independence_
and_Security_Act_of_2007/ (last accessed Feb. 13, 2009).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    To assist the agency in analyzing potential CAFE standards for MYs 
2012 through 2016, NHTSA is requesting updated future product plans 
from vehicle manufacturers, as well as production data through the 
recent past, including data about engines and transmissions for MY 2008 
through MY 2020 passenger cars and light trucks and the assumptions 
underlying those plans. NHTSA requests information for MYs 2008-2020 to 
aid NHTSA in developing a realistic forecast of the MY 2012-2016 
vehicle market. Information regarding earlier model years may help the 
agency to better account for cumulative effects such as volume- and 
time-based reductions in costs, and also may help to reveal product mix 
and technology application trends during model years for which the 
agency is currently receiving actual CAFE compliance data. Information 
regarding later model years helps the agency gain a better 
understanding of how manufacturers' plans through MY 2016 relate to 
their longer-term expectations regarding EISA requirements, market 
trends, and prospects for more advanced technologies (such as HCCI 
engines, and plug-in hybrid, electric, and fuel cell vehicles, among 
others). NHTSA will also consider information from model years before 
and after MYs 2012-2016 when reviewing manufacturers' planned schedules 
for redesigning and freshening their products, in order to examine how 
manufacturers anticipate tying technology introduction to product 
design schedules. In addition, the agency is requesting information 
regarding manufacturers' estimates of the future vehicle population, 
and fuel economy improvements and incremental costs attributed to 
technologies reflected in those plans. The request for information is 
detailed in appendices to this notice. NHTSA has also included a number 
of questions directed primarily toward vehicle manufacturers. They can 
be found in Appendix A to this notice. Answers to those questions will 
assist the agency in its analysis.
    Given the importance that responses to this request for comment may 
have in NHTSA's upcoming CAFE rulemaking,

[[Page 9187]]

either as part of the basis for the proposed standards or as an 
independent check on them, NHTSA intends to review carefully and 
critically all data provided by commenters. It is crucial that 
commenters fully respond to each question, particularly by providing 
information regarding the basis for technology costs and effectiveness 
estimates. Additionally, the agency notes that, in connection with 
recent deliberations regarding federal assistance to the industry, some 
manufacturers submitted short business plans to Congress in December 
2008 \2\ and restructuring plans to the Treasury Department in February 
2009,\3\ and that some statements in these plans suggest that 
manufacturers' product plans may have changed considerably since NHTSA 
last received detailed confidential product plans in July 2008. In 
light of these statements, and in light of the current uncertainty 
surrounding the auto industry, NHTSA will closely review the product 
plans submitted in response to today's request. We will carefully 
assess any significant apparent discrepancies between submitted product 
plans and manufacturers' public statements.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \2\ Links to these business plans may be found at http://
financialservices.house.gov/autostabilization.html (last accessed 
February 13, 2008).
    \3\ Chrysler's submission to the Treasury Department is 
available at http://www.treasury.gov/initiatives/eesa/agreements/
auto-reports/ChryslerRestructuringPlan.pdf (last accessed Feb. 19, 
2009), and GM's submission to the Treasury Department is available 
at http://www.treasury.gov/initiatives/eesa/agreements/auto-reports/
GMRestructuringPlan.pdf (last accessed Feb. 19, 2009).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    To facilitate the submission of comments and to help ensure the 
conformity of data received regarding manufacturers' product plans from 
MY 2008 through MY 2020, NHTSA has developed spreadsheet templates for 
manufacturers' use. The uniformity provided by these spreadsheets is 
intended to aid and expedite our review, integration, and analysis of 
the information provided. These templates are the agency's strongly 
preferred format for data submittal, and can be found on the Volpe 
National Transportation Systems Center (Volpe Center) Web site at ftp:/
/ftpserver.volpe.dot.gov/pub/CAFE/templates/ or can be requested from 
Mr. Peter Feather at peter.feather@dot.gov. The templates include an 
automated tool (i.e., a macro) that performs some auditing to identify 
missing or potentially erroneous entries. The appendices to this 
document also include sample tables that manufacturers may refer to 
when submitting their data to the agency.
    In addition, NHTSA would like to note that we will share the 
information submitted in response to this notice with the Environmental 
Protection Agency (EPA). This sharing will facilitate our consideration 
of the appropriate factors to be used in establishing fuel economy 
standards for MY 2012 and beyond. We will ensure that confidential 
information that is shared is protected from disclosure in accordance 
with NHTSA's practices in this area.

II. Submission of Comments

How Do I Prepare and Submit Comments?

    Comments should be submitted using the spreadsheet template 
described above. Please include the docket number of this document in 
your comments. Please submit two copies of your comments, including the 
attachments, to Docket Management at the address given above under 
ADDRESSES. Comments may also be submitted to the docket electronically 
by logging onto http://www.regulations.gov. Click on ``How to Use This 
Site'' and then ``User Tips'' to obtain instructions for filing the 
document electronically.

How Can I Be Sure That My Comments Were Received?

    If you wish Docket Management to notify you upon its receipt of 
your comments, enclose a self-addressed, stamped postcard in the 
envelope containing your comments. Upon receiving your comments, Docket 
Management will return the postcard by mail.

How Do I Submit Confidential Business Information?

    If you wish to submit any information under a claim of 
confidentiality, you should submit three copies of your complete 
submission, including the information you claim to be confidential 
business information, to the Chief Counsel, NHTSA, at the address given 
above under FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT. In addition, you should 
submit a copy from which you have deleted the claimed confidential 
business information to the docket. When you send a comment containing 
information claimed to be confidential business information, you should 
include a cover letter setting forth the information specified in our 
confidential business information regulation. (49 CFR Part 512.)

Will the Agency Consider Late Comments?

    We will consider all comments that Docket Management receives 
before the close of business on the comment closing date indicated 
above under DATES. Due to the time frame of the upcoming rulemaking, we 
will be very limited in our ability to consider comments filed after 
the comment closing date. If a comment is received too late for us to 
consider it in developing a final rule, we will consider that comment 
as an informal suggestion for future rulemaking action.

How Can I Read the Comments Submitted by Other People?

    You may read the comments received by Docket Management at the 
address given above under ADDRESSES. The hours of the Docket are 
indicated above in the same location. You may also see the comments on 
the Internet. To read the comments on the Internet, take the following 
steps:
    (1) Go to http://www.regulations.gov.
    (2) On that page, in the field marked ``search,'' type in the 
docket number provided at the top of this document.
    (3) The next page will contain results for that docket number; it 
may help you to sort by ``Date Posted: Oldest to Recent.''
    (4) On the results page, click on the desired comments. You may 
download the comments. However, since the comments are imaged 
documents, instead of word processing documents, the downloaded 
comments may not be word searchable.
    Please note that even after the comment closing date, we will 
continue to file relevant information in the Docket as it becomes 
available. Accordingly, we recommend that you periodically check the 
Docket for new material.
    Anyone is able to search the electronic form of all comments 
received into any of our dockets by the name of the individual 
submitting the comment (or signing the comment, if submitted on behalf 
of an association, business, labor union, etc.). You may review DOT's 
complete Privacy Act Statement in the Federal Register published on 
April 11, 2000 (Volume 65, Number 70; Pages 19477-78) or you may visit 
http://www.dot.gov/privacy.html.

    Authority: 49 U.S.C. 32902; delegation of authority at 49 CFR 
1.50.


[[Page 9188]]


    Issued on: February 26, 2009.
Stephen R. Kratzke,
Associate Administrator for Rulemaking.

Appendix A

I. Definitions

    As used in these appendices--
    1. ``Automobile,'' ``fuel economy,'' ``manufacturer,'' and 
``model year (MY),'' have the meaning given them in Section 32901 of 
Chapter 329 of Title 49 of the United States Code, 49 U.S.C. 32901.
    2. ``Basic engine'' has the meaning given in 40 CFR 600.002-
93(a)(21).
    3. ``Cargo-carrying volume,'' ``gross vehicle weight rating'' 
(GVWR), and ``passenger-carrying volume'' are used as defined in 49 
CFR 523.2.
    4. ``CARB'' means California Air Resource Board.
    5. ``Domestically manufactured'' is used as defined in Section 
32904(b)(2) of Chapter 329, 49 U.S.C. 32904(b)(2).
    6. ``Footprint'' means the product of average track width 
(measured in inches and rounded to the nearest tenth of an inch) 
times wheelbase (measured in inches and rounded to the nearest tenth 
of an inch) divided by 144 and then rounded to the nearest tenth of 
a square foot as described in 49 CFR Part 523.2.
    7. ``Light truck'' means an automobile of the type described in 
49 CFR Part 523.3 and 523.5.
    8. A ``model'' of passenger car is a line, such as the Chevrolet 
Impala, Ford Fusion, Honda Accord, etc., which exists within a 
manufacturer's fleet.
    9. ``Model Type'' is used as defined in 40 CFR 600.002-
93(a)(19).
    10. ``MY'' means model year.
    11. ``Passenger car'' means an automobile of the type described 
in 49 CFR Part 523.3 and 523.4.
    12. ``Percent fuel economy improvements'' means that percentage 
which corresponds to the amount by which respondent could improve 
the fuel economy of vehicles in a given model or class through the 
application of a specified technology, averaged over all vehicles of 
that model or in that class which feasibly could use the technology. 
Projections of percent fuel economy improvement should be based on 
the assumption of maximum efforts by respondent to achieve the 
highest possible fuel economy increase through the application of 
the technology. The baseline for determination of percent fuel 
economy improvement is the level of technology and vehicle 
performance with respect to acceleration and gradeability for 
respondent's 2008 model year passenger cars or light trucks in the 
equivalent class.
    13. ``Percent production implementation rate'' means that 
percentage which corresponds to the maximum number of passenger cars 
or light trucks of a specified class, which could feasibly employ a 
given type of technology if respondent made maximum efforts to apply 
the technology by a specified model year.
    14. ``Production percentage'' means the percent of respondent's 
passenger cars or light trucks of a specified model projected to be 
manufactured in a specified model year.
    15. ``Project'' or ``projection'' refers to the best estimates 
made by respondent, whether or not based on less than certain 
information.
    16. ``Redesign'' means any change, or combination of changes, to 
a vehicle that would change its weight by 50 pounds or more or 
change its frontal area or aerodynamic drag coefficient by 2 percent 
or the implementation of new engine or transmission.
    17. ``Refresh'' means any change, or combination of changes, to 
a vehicle that would change its weight by less than 50 pounds and 
would not change its frontal area or aerodynamic drag coefficient.
    18. ``Relating to'' means constituting, defining, containing, 
explaining, embodying, reflecting, identifying, stating, referring 
to, dealing with, or in any way pertaining to.
    19. ``Respondent'' means each manufacturer (including all its 
divisions) providing answers to the questions set forth in this 
appendix, and its officers, employees, agents or servants.
    20. ``RPE'' means retail price equivalent.
    21. ``Test Weight'' is used as defined in 40 CFR 86.082-2.
    22. ``Track Width'' means the lateral distance between the 
centerlines of the base tires at ground, including the camber angle.
    23. ``Truckline'' means the name assigned by the Environmental 
Protection Agency to a different group of vehicles within a make or 
car division in accordance with that agency's 2001 model year 
pickup, van (cargo vans and passenger vans are considered separate 
truck lines), and special purpose vehicle criteria.
    24. ``Variants of existing engines'' means versions of an existing 
basic engine that differ from that engine in terms of displacement, 
method of aspiration, induction system or that weigh at least 25 pounds 
more or less than that engine.
    25. ``Wheelbase'' means the longitudinal distance between front and 
rear wheel centerlines.

II. Assumptions

    All assumptions concerning emission standards, damageability 
regulations, safety standards, etc., should be listed and described in 
detail by the respondent.

III. Specifications--Passenger Car and Light Truck Data

    Go to ftp://ftpserver.volpe.dot.gov/pub/CAFE/templates/ for 
spreadsheet templates.
    1. Identify all passenger car and light truck models offered for 
sale in MY 2008 whose production respondent projects discontinuing 
before MY 2011 and identify the last model year in which each will be 
offered.
    2. Identify all basic engines offered by respondent in MY 2008 
passenger cars and light trucks which respondent projects it will cease 
to offer for sale in passenger cars before MY 2011, and identify the 
last model year in which each will be offered.
    3. For each model year 2008-2020, list all known or projected car 
and truck lines and provide the information specified below for each 
model type. Model types that are essentially identical except for their 
nameplates (e.g., Ford Fusion/Mercury Milan) may be combined into one 
item. Engines having the same displacement but belonging to different 
engine families are to be grouped separately. Within the fleet, the 
vehicles are to be sorted first by car or truck line, second by basic 
engine, and third by transmission type. For each model type, a specific 
indexed engine and transmission are to be identified. As applicable, an 
indexed predecessor model type is also to be identified. Spreadsheet 
templates can be found at ftp://ftpserver.volpe.dot.gov/pub/CAFE/
templates/. These templates include codes and definitions for the data 
that the agency is seeking, including, but not limited to the 
following:
A. General Information
    1. Vehicle Number--a unique number assigned to each model.
    2. Manufacturer--manufacturer's name (e.g., Toyota).
    3. Model--name of model (e.g., Camry).
    4. Nameplate--vehicle nameplate (e.g., Camry Solara).
    5. Primary Fuel--classified as CNG = compressed natural gas; D = 
diesel; E = electricity; E-85 = ethanol; E100 = neat ethanol; G = 
gasoline; H = hydrogen; LNG = liquefied natural gas; LPG = propane; M85 
= methanol; M100 = neat methanol
    6. Fuel Economy on Primary Fuel--measured in miles per gallon; 
laboratory fuel economy (weighted FTP+highway GEG, exclusive of any 
calculation under 49 U.S.C. 32905).
    7. Secondary Fuel--classified as CNG = compressed natural gas; D = 
diesel; E = electricity; E-85 = ethanol; E100 = neat ethanol; G = 
gasoline; H = hydrogen; LNG = liquefied natural gas; LPG = propane; M85 
= methanol; M100 = neat methanol.
    8. Fuel Economy on Secondary Fuel--measured in miles per gallon; 
laboratory fuel economy (weighted FTP+highway GEG, exclusive of any 
calculation under 49 U.S.C. 32905).
    9. Tertiary Fuel--classified as CNG = compressed natural gas; D = 
diesel; E = electricity; E-85 = ethanol; E100 = neat ethanol; G = 
gasoline; H = hydrogen; LNG = liquefied natural gas; LPG = propane; M85 
= methanol; M100 = neat methanol
    10. Fuel Economy on Tertiary Fuel--measured in miles per gallon; 
laboratory fuel economy (weighted FTP+highway GEG, exclusive of any 
calculation under 49 U.S.C. 32905).
    11. CAFE Fuel Economy--measured in miles per gallon; laboratory 
fuel economy (weighted FTP+highway GEG, inclusive of any calculation 
under 49 U.S.C. 32905)
    12. Engine Code--unique number assigned to each engine.
    A. Manufacturer--manufacturer's name (e.g., General Motors, Ford, 
Toyota, Honda).
    B. Name--name of engine.
    C. Configuration--classified as V = V-shaped; I = inline; R = 
rotary, H = horizontally opposed (boxer).
    D. Primary Fuel--classified as CNG = compressed natural gas, D = 
diesel, E85 = ethanol, E100 = neat ethanol, G = gasoline, H = hydrogen, 
LNG = liquefied natural gas, LPG = propane, M85 = methanol, M100 = neat 
methanol.
    E. Secondary Fuel--classified as CNG = compressed natural gas, D = 
diesel, E85 =

[[Page 9189]]

ethanol, E100 = neat ethanol, G = gasoline, H = hydrogen, LNG = 
liquefied natural gas, LPG = propane, M85 = methanol, M100 = neat 
methanol.
    F. Country of Origin--name of country where engine is manufactured.
    G. Engine Oil Viscosity--typical values as text include 0W20, 5W20, 
etc.; ratio between the applied shear stress and the rate of shear, 
which measures the resistance of flow of the engine oil (as per SAE 
Glossary of Automotive Terms).
    H. Cycle--combustion cycle of engine: classified as A = Atkinson, 
AM = Atkinson/Miller, D = Diesel, M = Miller, O = Otto, OA = Otto/
Atkinson.
    I. Air/Fuel Ratio--the weighted (FTP + highway) air/fuel ratio 
(mass); a number generally around 14.7.
    J. Fuel Delivery System--mechanism that delivers fuel to engine: 
classified as SGDI = stoichiometric gasoline direct injection; LBGDI = 
lean-burn gasoline direct injection; SFI = sequential fuel injection; 
MPFI = multipoint fuel injection; TBI = throttle body fuel injection; 
CRDI = common rail direct injection (diesel); UDI = unit injector 
direct injection (diesel).
    K. Aspiration--breathing or induction process of engine (as per SAE 
Automotive Dictionary); classified as NA = naturally aspirated, S = 
supercharged, T = turbocharged, T2 = twin turbocharged, T4 = quad-
turbocharged, ST = supercharged and turbocharged.
    L. Valvetrain Design--design of the total mechanism from camshaft 
to valve of an engine that actuates the lifting and closing of a valve 
(as per SAE Glossary of Automotive Terms): classified as CVA = camless 
valve actuation, DOHC = dual overhead cam, OHV = overhead valve, SOHC = 
single overhead cam.
    M. Valve Actuation/Timing--valve opening and closing points in the 
operating cycle (as per SAE J604): classified as F = fixed, ICP = 
intake cam phasing, CCP = coupled cam phasing, DCP = dual cam phasing.
    N. Valve Lift--describes the manner in which the valve is raised 
during combustion (as per SAE Automotive Dictionary): classified as F = 
fixed, DVVL = discrete variable valve lift, CVVL = continuously 
variable valve lift.
    O. Cylinders--the number of engine cylinders: an integer equaling 
3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10 or 12.
    P. Valves/Cylinder--the number of valves per cylinder: an integer 
from 2 through 5.
    Q. Deactivation--presence of cylinder deactivation mechanism: 
classified as Y = cylinder deactivation applied; N = cylinder 
deactivation not applied.
    R. Displacement--total volume displaced by a piston in a single 
stroke multiplied by the number of cylinders; measured in liters.
    S. Compression Ratio (min)--typically a number between 8 and 11 
(for fixed CR engines, should be identical to maximum CR).
    T. Compression Ratio (max)--typically a number between 8 and 20 
(for fixed CR engines, should be identical to minimum CR).
    U. Max. Horsepower--the maximum power of the engine, measured as 
horsepower.
    V. Max. Horsepower RPM--rpm at which maximum horsepower is 
achieved.
    W. Max. Torque--the maximum torque of the engine, measured as lb-
ft.
    X. Max Torque RPM--rpm at which maximum torque is achieved.
    13. Transmission Code--unique number assigned to each transmission.
    A. Manufacturer--manufacturer's name (e.g., General Motors, Ford, 
Toyota, Honda).
    B. Name--name of transmission.
    C. Country of origin--where the transmission is manufactured.
    D. Type--type of transmission: classified as M = manual, A = 
automatic (torque converter), AMT = automated manual transmission 
(single clutch w/ torque interrupt), DCT = dual clutch transmission, 
CVT1 = belt or chain CVT, CVT2 = other CVT (e.g., toroidal), HEVT = 
hybrid/electric vehicle transmission (for a BISG or CISG type hybrid 
please define the actual transmission used, not HEVT).
    E. Clutch Type--type of clutch used in AMT or DCT type 
transmission: D = dry, W = wet.
    F. Number of Forward Gears--classified as an integer indicating the 
number of forward gears; ``CVT'' for a CVT type transmission; or ``n/
a'' for an electric vehicle.
    G. Logic--indicates aggressivity of automatic shifting: classified 
as A = aggressive, C = conventional U.S. Provide rationale for 
selection in the transmission notes column.
    14. Origin--classification (under CAFE program) as domestic or 
import: D = domestic, I = import.
B. Production
    1. Production--actual and projected U.S. production for MY 2008 to 
MY 2020 inclusive, measured in number of vehicles.
    2. Percent of Production Regulated by CARB Standards--percent of 
production volume that will be regulated under CARB's AB 1493 for MY 
2008 to MY 2020 inclusive.
C. MSRP--measured in dollars (2009); actual and projected average MSRP 
(sales-weighted, including options) for MY 2008 to MY 2020 inclusive.
D. Vehicle Information
    1. Subclass--for technology application purposes only and should 
not be confused with vehicle classification for regulatory purposes: 
classified as Subcompact, Subcompact Performance, Compact, Compact 
Performance, Midsize, Midsize Performance, Large, Large Performance, 
Minivan, Small LT, Midsize LT, Large LT; where LT = SUV/Pickup/Van; use 
tables below, with example vehicles, to place vehicles into most 
appropriate subclass.

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                Subclass                         Example vehicles
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Subcompact.............................  Chevy Aveo, Honda Civic.
Subcompact Performance.................  Mazda Miata, Saturn Sky.
Compact................................  Chevy Cobalt, Nissan Sentra and
                                          Altima.
Compact Performance....................  Audi S4 Quattro, Mazda RX8.
Midsize................................  Chevy Camaro (V6), Toyota
                                          Camry, Honda Accord, Hyundai
                                          Azera.
Midsize Performance....................  Chevy Corvette, Ford Mustang
                                          (V8), Nissan G37 Coupe.
Large..................................  Audi A8, Cadillac CTS and DTS.
Large Performance......................  Bentley Arnage, Daimler CL600.
Minivans...............................  Dodge Caravan, Toyota Sienna.
Small SUV/Pickup/Van...................  Ford Escape & Ranger, Nissan
                                          Rogue.
Midsize SUV/Pickup/Van.................  Chevy Colorado, Jeep Wrangler 4-
                                          door, Volvo XC70, Toyota
                                          Tacoma.
Large SUV/Pickup/Van...................  Chevy Silverado, Ford
                                          Econoline, Toyota Sequoia.
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    2. Style--classified as Convertible, Coupe, Hatchback, Sedan, 
Minivan, Pickup, Sport Utility, Van, Wagon.
    3. Light Truck Indicator--an integer; a unique number(s) assigned 
to each vehicle which represents the design feature(s) that classify it 
as a light truck. classified as: (0) The vehicle neither has off-road 
design features (defined under 49 CFR 523.5(b) and described by numbers 
1 and 2 below) nor has functional characteristics (defined under 49 CFR 
523.5(a) and described by numbers 3 through 7 below) that would allow 
it to be properly classified as a light truck, thus the vehicle is 
properly classified as a passenger car.
    > An automobile capable of off-highway operation, as indicated by 
the fact that it:
    (1)(i) Has 4-wheel drive; or
    (ii) Is rated at more than 6,000 pounds gross vehicle weight; and
    (2) Has at least four of the following characteristics calculated 
when the automobile is at curb weight, on a level surface, with the 
front wheels parallel to the automobile's longitudinal centerline, and 
the tires inflated to the manufacturer's recommended pressure--
    (i) Approach angle of not less than 28 degrees.
    (ii) Breakover angle of not less than 14 degrees.
    (iii) Departure angle of not less than 20 degrees.
    (iv) Running clearance of not less than 20 centimeters.
    (v) Front and rear axle clearances of not less than 18 centimeters 
each.
    > An automobile designed to perform at least one of the following 
functions:
    (3) Transport more than 10 persons;
    (4) Provide temporary living quarters;
    (5) Transport property on an open bed;
    (6) Provide, as sold to the first retail purchaser, greater cargo-
carrying than passenger-carrying volume, such as in a cargo van; if a 
vehicle is sold with a second-row seat, its cargo-carrying volume is 
determined with that seat installed, regardless of whether the 
manufacturer has described that seat as optional; or
    (7) Permit expanded use of the automobile for cargo-carrying 
purposes or other nonpassenger-carrying purposes through:
    (i) For non-passenger automobiles manufactured prior to model year 
2012, the

[[Page 9190]]

removal of seats by means installed for that purpose by the 
automobile's manufacturer or with simple tools, such as screwdrivers 
and wrenches, so as to create a flat, floor level, surface extending 
from the forwardmost point of installation of those seats to the rear 
of the automobile's interior; or
    (ii) For non-passenger automobiles manufactured in model year 2008 
and beyond, for vehicles equipped with at least 3 rows of designated 
seating positions as standard equipment, permit expanded use of the 
automobile for cargo-carrying purposes or other nonpassenger-carrying 
purposes through the removal or stowing of foldable or pivoting seats 
so as to create a flat, leveled cargo surface extending from the 
forwardmost point of installation of those seats to the rear of the 
automobile's interior.
    4. Structure--classified as either L = Ladder or U = Unibody.
    5. Drive--classified as A = all-wheel drive; F = front-wheel drive; 
R = rear-wheel-drive; 4 = 4-wheel drive \4\.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \4\ NHTSA considers ``4-wheel drive'' to refer only to vehicles 
that have selectable 2- and 4-wheel drive options, as opposed to 
all-wheel drive, which is not driver-selectable.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    6. Axle Ratio--ratio of the speed in revolutions per minute of the 
drive shaft to that of the drive wheels.
    7. Length--measured in inches; defined per SAE J1100, L103 (Sept. 
2005).
    8. Width--measured in inches; defined per SAE J1100, W116 (Sept. 
2005).
    9. Wheelbase--measured to the nearest tenth of an inch; defined per 
SAE J1100, L101 (Sept. 2005), and clarified above.
    10. Track Width (front)--measured to the nearest tenth of an inch; 
defined per SAE J1100, W101-1 (Sept. 2005), and clarified above.
    11. Track Width (rear)--measured to the nearest tenth of an inch; 
defined per SAE J1100, W101-2 (Sept. 2005), and clarified above.
    12. Footprint--the product of average track width (measured in 
inches and rounded to the nearest tenth of an inch) times wheelbase 
(measured in inches and rounded to the nearest tenth of an inch) 
divided by 144 and then rounded to the nearest tenth of a square foot; 
defined per 49 CFR 523.2.
    13. Base Tire--the tire specified as standard equipment by a 
manufacturer on each vehicle configuration of a model type (e.g., 275/
40R17).
    14. Running Clearance--measured in centimeters, defined per 49 CFR 
523.2.
    15. Front Axle Clearance--measured in centimeters, defined per 49 
CFR 523.2.
    16. Rear Axle Clearance--measured in centimeters, defined per 49 
CFR 523.2.
    17. Approach Angle--measured in degrees, defined per 49 CFR 523.2.
    18. Breakover Angle--measured in degrees, defined per 49 CFR 523.2.
    19. Departure Angle--measured in degrees, defined per 49 CFR 523.2.
    20. Curb Weight--total weight of vehicle including batteries, 
lubricants, and other expendable supplies but excluding the driver, 
passengers, and other payloads, measured in pounds; per SAE J1100 
(Sept. 2005).
    21. Test Weight--weight of vehicle as tested, including the driver, 
operator (if necessary), and all instrumentation (as per SAE J1263), 
measured in pounds.
    22. GVWR--Gross Vehicle Weight Rating, as defined per 49 CFR 523.2 
measured in pounds.
    23. Towing Capacity (Maximum)--measured in pounds.
    24. Payload--measured in pounds.
    25. Cargo volume behind the front row--measured in cubic feet, 
defined per Table 28 of SAE J1100 (Sept. 2005).
    26. Cargo volume behind the second row--measured in cubic feet, 
defined per Table 28 of SAE J1100 (Sept. 2005).
    27. Cargo volume behind the third row--measured in cubic feet, 
defined per Table 28 of SAE J1100 (Sept. 2005).
    28. Enclosed Volume--measured in cubic feet.
    29. Passenger Volume--measured in cubic feet; the volume measured 
using SAE J1100 as per EPA Fuel Economy regulations (40 CFR 600.315-82, 
``Classes of Comparable Automobiles''). This is the number that 
manufacturers calculate and submit to EPA.
    30. Cargo Volume Index--defined per Table 28 of SAE J1100 (Sept. 
2005).
    31. Luggage Capacity--measured in cubic feet, defined per SAE 
J1100, V1 (Sept. 2005).
    32. Seating (max)--number of usable seat belts before folding and 
removal of seats (where accomplished without special tools), provided 
in integer form.
    33. Number of Standard Rows of Seating--number of rows of seats 
that each vehicle comes with as standard equipment provided in integer 
form (e.g., 1, 2 ,3, 4, or 5).
    34. Frontal Area--a measure of the wind profile of the vehicle, 
typically calculated as the height times width of a vehicle body, e.g., 
25 square feet.
    35. Aerodynamic Drag Coefficient, Cd--a dimensionless 
coefficient that relates the motion resistance force created by the air 
drag over the entire surface of a moving vehicle to the force of 
dynamic air pressure acting only over the vehicle's frontal area, e.g., 
0.25.
    36. Tire Rolling Resistance, Crr--a dimensionless 
coefficient that relates the motion resistance force due to tire energy 
losses (e.g., deflection, scrubbing, slip, and air drag) to a vehicle's 
weight, e.g., 0.0012.
    37. Fuel Capacity--measured in gallons of diesel fuel or gasoline; 
MJ (LHV) of other fuels (or chemical battery energy).
    38. Electrical System Voltage--measured in volts, e.g., 12 volt, 42 
volts 2005).
    39. Power Steering--H = hydraulic; E = electric; EH = electro-
hydraulic.
    40. Percent of Production Volume Equipped with A/C.
    41. A/C Refrigerant Type--e.g., HFC-134a, HFC-152a, CO2.
    42. A/C Compressor Displacement--measured in cubic centimeters.
    43. A/C CARB credit--measured in grams per mile, g/mile 
CO2 equivalent as reportable under California ARB's AB 1493 
Regulation.
    44. N2O Emission Rate--measured in grams per mile, as 
reportable under California ARB's AB 1493 Regulation.
    45. CH4 Emission Rate--measured in grams per mile, as 
reportable under California ARB's AB 1493 Regulation.
    46. Estimated Total CARB Credits--measured in grams per mile, g/
mile CO2 equivalent as reportable under California ARB's AB 
1493 Regulation.
E. Hybridization/Electrification
    1. Type of Hybrid/Electric vehicle--classified as MHEV = 12V micro 
hybrid, BISG = belt mounted integrated starter generator, CISG = crank 
mounted integrated starter generator, PSHEV = power-split hybrid, 2MHEV 
= 2-mode hybrid, PHEV = plug-in hybrid, EV = electric vehicle, H = 
hydraulic hybrid, P = pneumatic hybrid.
    2. Voltage (volts) or, for hydraulic hybrids, pressure (psi).
    3. Energy storage capacity--measured in MJ.
    4. Electric Motor Power Rating--measured in hp or kW.
    5. Battery type--classified as NiMH = Nickel Metal Hydride; Li-ion 
= Lithium Ion.
    6. Battery Only Range (charge depleting PHEV)--measured in miles.
    7. Maximum Battery Only Speed--measured in miles per hour; maximum 
speed at which a HEV can still operate solely on battery power measured 
on a flat road using the vehicle's FTP weight and coefficients.
    8. Percentage of braking energy recovered and stored over weighted 
FTP + highway drive cycle.
    9. Percentage of maximum motive power provided by stored energy 
system.
    10. Electrified Accessories--list of electrified accessories: 
classified as WP = water (coolant) pump, OP = oil pump, AC = air 
conditioner compressor.
F. Energy Consumption \5\--of total fuel energy (higher heating value) 
consumed over FTP and highway tests (each weighted as for items 5 and 6 
above), shares attributable to the following loss mechanisms, such that 
the sum of the shares equals one.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \5\ This information is sought in order to account for a given 
vehicle model's fuel economy as partitioned into nine energy loss 
mechanisms. The agency may use this information to estimate the 
extent to which a given technology reduces losses in each mechanism.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    1. System irreversibility governed by the Second Law of 
Thermodynamics.
    2. Heat lost to the exhaust and coolant streams.
    3. Engine friction (i.e., the part of mechanical efficiency lost to 
friction in such engine components as bearings and rods, as could be 
estimated from engine dynamometer test results).
    4. Pumping losses (i.e., the part of mechanical efficiency lost to 
work done on gases inside the cylinder, as could be estimated from 
engine dynamometer test results).
    5. Accessory losses (i.e., the part of fuel efficiency lost to work 
done by engine-driven accessories, as could be estimated from bench 
test results for the individual components).
    6. Transmission losses (i.e., the part of driveline efficiency lost 
to friction in such transmission components as gears, bearings, and 
hydraulics, as could be estimated from chassis dynamometer test 
results).
    7. Aerodynamic drag of the body, as could be estimated from coast-
down test results.

[[Page 9191]]

    8. Rolling resistance in the tires, as could be estimated from 
coast-down test results.
    9. Work done on the vehicle itself, as could be estimated from the 
vehicle's inertia mass and the fuel economy driving cycles.
G. Planning and Assembly
    1. U.S. Content--overall percentage, by value, that originated in 
the U.S.
    2. Canadian Content--overall percentage, by value, that originated 
in Canada.
    3. Mexican Content--overall percentage, by value, that originated 
in Mexico.
    4. Domestic Content--overall percentage, by value, that originated 
in the U.S, Canada and Mexico.
    5. Final Assembly City.
    6. Final Assembly State/Province (if applicable).
    7. Final Assembly Country.
    8. Predecessor--number (or name) of model upon which current model 
is based, if any.
    9. Refresh Years--model years of most recent and future refreshes 
through the 2020 time period, e.g., 2010, 2015, 2020.
    10. Redesign Years--model years of most recent and future redesigns 
through the 2020 time period, e.g., 2007, 2012, 2017; where redesign 
means any change or combination of changes to a vehicle that would 
change its weight by 50 pounds or more or change its frontal area or 
aerodynamic drag coefficient by 2 percent or more.
    11. Employment Hours Per Vehicle--number of hours of U.S. labor 
applied per vehicle produced.
H. The agency also requests that each manufacturer provide an estimate 
of its overall passenger car CAFE and light truck CAFE for each model 
year. This estimate should be included as an entry in the spreadsheets 
that are submitted to the agency.
    4. As applicable, please explain in detail the relationship between 
the business plans submitted to Congress in December 2008, the 
restructuring plans submitted to the Treasury Department in February 
2009, and the product plans being submitted in response to this 
request.
    5. Relative to MY 2008 levels, for MYs 2008-2020 please provide 
information, by carline and as an average effect on a manufacturer's 
entire passenger car fleet, and by truckline and as an average effect 
on a manufacturer's entire light truck fleet, on the weight and/or fuel 
economy impacts of the following standards or equipment:
    A. Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS No. 208) Automatic 
Restraints.
    B. FMVSS No. 201 Occupant Protection in Interior Impact.
    C. Voluntary installation of safety equipment (e.g., antilock 
brakes).
    D. Environmental Protection Agency regulations.
    E. California Air Resources Board requirements.
    F. Other applicable motor vehicle regulations affecting fuel 
economy.
    6. For each specific model year and model of respondent's passenger 
car and light truck fleets projected to implement one or more of the 
following and/or any other weight reduction methods:
    A. Substitution of materials.
    B. ``Downsizing'' of existing vehicle design, systems or 
components.
    C. Use of new vehicle, structural, system or component designs.
    Please provide the following information:
    (i) Description of the method (e.g., substituting an composite body 
panel for a steel panel);
    (ii) The weight reduction, in pounds, averaged over the model;
    (iii) The percent fuel economy improvement averaged over the model;
    (iv) The basis for your answer to (iii) (e.g., data from 
dynamometer tests conducted by respondent, engineering analysis, 
computer simulation, reports of test by others);
    (v) The incremental RPE cost (in 2009 dollars), averaged over the 
model, associated with the method;
    (vi) The percent production implementation rate and the reasons 
limiting the implementation rate.
    7. For each specific model year and model of respondent's passenger 
car and light truck fleets projected to implement one or more of the 
following and/or any other aerodynamic drag reduction methods:
    A. Revised exterior components (e.g., front fascia or side view 
mirrors).
    B. Addition of underbody panels.
    C. Vehicle design changes (e.g., change in ride height or optimized 
cooling flow path).
    Please provide the following information:
    (i) Description of the method/aerodynamic change;
    (ii) The percent reduction of the aerodynamic drag coefficient 
(Cd) and the Cd prior to the reduction, averaged 
over the model;
    (iii) The percent fuel economy improvement, averaged over the 
model;
    (iv) The basis for your answer to (iii) (e.g., data from 
dynamometer tests conducted by respondent, wind tunnel testing, 
engineering analysis, computer simulation, reports of test by others);
    (v) The incremental RPE cost (in 2009 dollars), averaged over the 
model, associated with the method/change;
    (vi) The percent production implementation rate and the reasons 
limiting the implementation rate.
    8. Indicate any MY 2008-2020 passenger car and light truck model 
types that have higher average test weights than comparable MY 2007 
model types. Describe the reasons for any weight increases (e.g., 
increased option content, less use of premium materials) and provide 
supporting justification.
    9. Please provide your estimates of projected total industry U.S. 
passenger car sales and light truck sales, separately, for each model 
year from 2008 through 2020, inclusive.
    10. Please provide your company's assumptions for U.S. gasoline and 
diesel fuel prices during 2008 through 2020.
    11. Please provide projected production capacity available for the 
North American market (at standard production rates) for each of your 
company's passenger carline and light truckline designations during MYs 
2008-2020.
    12. Please provide your estimate of production lead-time for new 
models, your expected model life in years, and the number of years over 
which tooling costs are amortized. Additionally, the agency is 
requesting that manufactures provide vehicle or design changes that 
characterize a freshening and those changes that characterize a 
redesign.

IV. Technologies, Cost and Potential Fuel Economy Improvements

    Spreadsheet templates for the tables mentioned in the following 
section can be found at ftp://ftpserver.volpe.dot.gov/pub/cafe/
templates/.
    1. The agency requests that manufacturers, for each passenger car 
and light truck model projected to be manufactured by respondent 
between MY 2008-2020, provide the following information on new 
technology applications:
    (i) Description of the nature of the technological improvement; 
including the vehicle's baseline technology that the technology 
replaces (e.g., 6-speed automatic transmission replacing a 4-speed 
automatic transmission);
    (ii) The percent fuel economy improvement averaged over the model;
    (iii) The basis for your answer to (ii) (e.g., data from 
dynamometer tests conducted by respondent, engineering analysis, 
computer simulation, reports of test by others);
    (iv) The incremental RPE cost (in 2009 dollars), averaged over the 
model, associated with implementing the new technology;
    (v) The percent production implementation rate and the reasons 
limiting the implementation rate.
    In regards to costs, the agency is requesting information on cost 
reductions available through learning effects that are anticipated, so 
information should be provided regarding what the learning effects are, 
when and at what production volumes they occur, and to what degrees 
such learning is expected to be available.\6\ The agency is also asking 
that the RPE markup factor (used to determine the RPE cost estimates) 
is stated in the response.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \6\ ``Learning effects'' describes the reduction in unit 
production costs as a function of accumulated production volume and 
small redesigns that reduce costs. Applying learning effects, or 
``learning curves,'' requires estimates of three parameters: (1) The 
initial production volume that must be reached before cost 
reductions begin to be realized (referred to as ``threshold 
volume''); (2) the percent reduction in average unit cost that 
results from each successive doubling of cumulative production 
volume (usually referred to as the ``learning rate''); and (3) the 
initial cost of the technology. The method applies this effect for 
up to two doublings of production volume. For example, a 20 percent 
learning rate discount applied with a 300,000 unit threshold would 
reduce the applicable technology's incremental cost by up to 36 
percent.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    2. Additionally, the agency requests that manufactures and other 
interested parties provide the same information, as requested above, 
for the technologies listed in the following tables and any other 
potential technologies that may be implemented to improve fuel economy. 
These potential technologies can be inserted into additional rows at 
the end of each table. Examples of other potential technologies could 
include, but are not limited to: Homogenous Charge Compression Ignition 
(HCCI), Electric

[[Page 9192]]

Vehicle (EV), Fuel Cell Vehicle, Belt Mounted Integrated Starter 
Generator (BISG), and Crank Mounted Integrated Starter Generator (CISG) 
specific technologies. In an effort to standardize the information 
received the agency requests that if possible respondents fill in the 
following tables:
    Table IV-1 with estimates of the model year of availability for 
each technology listed and any other identified technology.
    Table IV-2 with estimated phase-in rates \7\ by year for each 
technology listed and any other additional technologies. Engineering, 
planning and financial constraints can prohibit many technologies from 
being applied across an entire fleet of vehicles within a single model 
year, so the agency requests information on possible constraints on the 
rates at which each technology can penetrate a manufacturer's fleet.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \7\ In NHTSA's 2006 rulemaking establishing CAFE standards for 
MY 2008-2011 light trucks, the agency considered phase-in caps by 
ceasing to add a given technology to a manufacturer's fleet in a 
specific model year once it has increased the corresponding 
penetration rate by at least the amount of the cap. Having done so, 
it applied other technologies in lieu of the ``capped'' technology.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Tables IV-3a, b and IV-4a, b with estimates for incremental RPE 
costs (in 2009 dollars) and incremental fuel consumption reductions for 
each technology listed and any other additional technologies. These 
estimates, for the technologies already listed, should assume that the 
preceding technologies, as defined by the decision trees in Appendix B, 
have already been applied and/or will be superseded. The agency is 
requesting that respondents fill in incremental RPE costs and fuel 
consumption reductions estimates for all vehicle subclasses listed. If 
a respondent feels that the incremental RPE cost and fuel consumption 
reduction estimates are similar for different subclasses they may 
combine subclasses.
    Table IV-5 with estimates for the percentage by which each 
technology reduces energy losses attributable to each of nine energy 
loss mechanisms.
    Tables IV-6a, b with estimates for synergies \8\ that can occur 
when multiple technologies are applied.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \8\When two or more technologies are added to a particular 
vehicle model to improve its fuel efficiency, the resultant fuel 
consumption reduction may sometimes be higher or lower than the 
product of the individual effectiveness values for those items. This 
may occur because one or more technologies applied to the same 
vehicle partially address the same source or sources of engine or 
vehicle losses. Alternately, this effect may be seen when one 
technology shifts the engine operating points, and therefore 
increases or reduces the fuel consumption reduction achieved by 
another technology or set of technologies. The difference between 
the observed fuel consumption reduction associated with a set of 
technologies and the product of the individual effectiveness values 
in that set is sometimes referred to as a ``synergy.'' Synergies may 
be positive (increased fuel consumption reduction compared to the 
product of the individual effects) or negative (decreased fuel 
consumption reduction).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    3. The agency also asks that manufacturers or other interested 
parties provide information on appropriate sequencing of technologies, 
so that accumulated cost and fuel consumption effects may be evaluated 
incrementally. As examples of possible technology sequences, ``decision 
trees'' are shown in Appendix B below.
    4. For each new or redesigned vehicle identified in response to 
Question III-3 and each new engine or fuel economy improvement 
identified in your response to Questions IV-1 and IV-2 provide your 
best estimate of the following, in terms of constant 2009 dollars:
    A. Total capital costs required to implement the new/redesigned 
model or improvement according to the implementation schedules 
specified in your response. Subdivide the capital costs into tooling, 
facilities, launch, and engineering costs.
    B. The maximum production capacity, expressed in units of capacity 
per year, associated with the capital expenditure in (A) above. Specify 
the number of production shifts on which your response is based and 
define ``maximum capacity'' as used in your answer.
    C. The actual capacity that is planned to be used each year for 
each new/redesigned model or fuel economy improvement.
    D. The increase in variable costs per affected unit, based on the 
production volume specified in (B) above.
    E. The equivalent retail price increase per affected vehicle for 
each new/redesigned model or improvement. Provide an example describing 
methodology used to determine the equivalent retail price increase.
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