Notice of Inventory Completion: Robert S. Peabody Museum of Archaeology, Phillips Academy, Andover, MA, 73952-73954 [E8-28696]

Download as PDF 73952 Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 234 / Thursday, December 4, 2008 / Notices Draft CCP/EA. The CCP will guide us in managing and administering Currituck NWR for the next 15 years. Alternative 2 is the foundation for the CCP. The compatibility determinations for recreational hunting, fishing, wildlife observation, wildlife photography, environmental education and interpretation, and trapping of selected furbearers for nuisance animal management are also available in the CCP. Background The National Wildlife Refuge System Improvement Act of 1997 (16 U.S.C. 668dd–668ee) (Improvement Act), which amended the National Wildlife Refuge System Administration Act of 1966, requires us to develop a CCP for each national wildlife refuge. The purpose for developing a CCP is to provide refuge managers with a 15-year plan for achieving refuge purposes and contributing toward the mission of the National Wildlife Refuge System, consistent with sound principles of fish and wildlife management, conservation, legal mandates, and our policies. In addition to outlining broad management direction on conserving wildlife and their habitats, CCPs identify wildlifedependent recreational opportunities available to the public, including opportunities for hunting, fishing, wildlife observation, wildlife photography, and environmental education and interpretation. We will review and update the CCP at least every 15 years in accordance with the Improvement Act. mstockstill on PROD1PC66 with NOTICES Comments Approximately 100 copies of the Draft CCP/EA were made available for a 30day public review period as announced in the Federal Register on February 9, 2006 (71 FR 6786). Eleven comments on the Draft CCP/EA were received. The Draft CCP/EA identified and evaluated three alternatives for managing the refuge over a 15-year period. Selected Alternative After considering the comments we received and based on the professional judgment of the planning team, we selected Alternative 2 for implementation. The preferred alternative will result in moderate program increases. All habitats on the refuge, including water levels of the impoundments and the vegetation, will be managed very intensively for migrating waterfowl. The staff will monitor vegetation in the marshes before and after prescribed burns and inventory vegetation in the maritime swamp forest. The refuge will continue VerDate Aug<31>2005 17:35 Dec 03, 2008 Jkt 217001 to allow the priority public uses (e.g., hunting, fishing, wildlife observation, wildlife photography, and environmental education and interpretation) and will have the capacity to increase the number of opportunities for public use. Authority: This notice is published under the authority of the National Wildlife Refuge System Improvement Act of 1997, Public Law 105–57. Dated: September 29, 2008. Cynthia K. Dohner, Acting Regional Director. [FR Doc. E8–28705 Filed 12–3–08; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4310–55–P DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Robert S. Peabody Museum of Archaeology, Phillips Academy, Andover, MA National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects in the possession of the Robert S. Peabody Museum of Archaeology, Phillips Academy, Andover, MA. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from Montezuma County, CO, and San Juan County, NM. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Robert S. Peabody Museum of Archaeology professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Navajo Nation, Arizona, New Mexico & Utah; Ohkay Owingeh, New Mexico (formerly the Pueblo of San Juan); Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; Pueblo of Cochiti, New Mexico; Pueblo of Isleta, New Mexico; Pueblo of Jemez, New Mexico; Pueblo of Laguna, New Mexico; Pueblo of Nambe, New Mexico; Pueblo of Picuris, New Mexico; Pueblo of Pojoaque, New Mexico; Pueblo of San Felipe, New Mexico; Pueblo of San Ildefonso, New Mexico; Pueblo of PO 00000 Frm 00052 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Sandia, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Ana, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Clara, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santo Domingo, New Mexico; Pueblo of Taos, New Mexico; Pueblo of Tesuque, New Mexico; Pueblo of Zia, New Mexico; Ysleta del Sur Pueblo of Texas; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico. In 1898, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were removed from ‘‘cliff house,’’ Mesa Verde, Montezuma, CO, by Warren King Moorehead for Robert S. Peabody. No known individual was identified. The one associated funerary object is the cotton cloth in which the mummified infant is wrapped. ‘‘Cliff house’’ may be Cliff Palace or it may be one of several unidentifiable structures excavated by Moorehead. Occupation dates for Mesa Verde are A.D. 600 to A.D. 1300. Based on Moorehead’s description and the cotton wrapping, the human remains fall within these dates. The Mesa Verde area was the center of important cultural developments archeologically classified as Pueblo I-III periods, during which people established aggregated agricultural villages with distinctive architecture, ceramics, and ceremonial practices. In 1897, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were removed from Pueblo Bonito, Chaco Group, San Juan County, NM, by Warren King Moorehead for Robert S. Peabody. No known individual was identified. The one associated funerary object is a reed mat. In 1897, human remains representing a minimum of two individuals were removed from Pueblo Bonito, Chaco Group, San Juan County, NM, by Warren King Moorehead for Robert S. Peabody. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1897, five associated funerary objects were removed from Pueblo Bonito, Chaco Group, San Juan County, NM, by Warren King Moorehead for Robert S. Peabody. The human remains are held by the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology at Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, which is a separate institution from the Robert S. Peabody Museum of Archaeology. The five associated funerary objects are one wood mat, one feathered robe, and three ceramic pitchers. Pueblo Bonito is the largest and most famous site in Chaco Canyon, and among the most well documented of the 12 Ancestral Puebloan ‘‘great houses’’ located there. As an architectural type, it shares with the others multiple stories, core-and-veneer masonry E:\FR\FM\04DEN1.SGM 04DEN1 mstockstill on PROD1PC66 with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 234 / Thursday, December 4, 2008 / Notices construction, and larger rooms and subterranean kivas than found in preceding periods. Pueblo Bonito’s planned D-shaped structure was five stories high along its back wall and may have had 800 rooms. It was built in three major episodes beginning around A.D. 919 and ending about A.D. 1140. At its peak in the late 10th century as many as 600 rooms may have been in use. In 1897, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were removed from a ‘‘Graveyard’’ near Chaco Group, San Juan County, NM, by Warren King Moorehead for Robert S. Peabody. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. This site is a small ‘‘cemetery’’ about a mile from Pueblo Bonito. Archeological evidence indicates that Puebloan people were in Chaco Canyon since at least the Basketmaker period (circa A.D. 1). A survey of the Chaco area has identified what archeologists refer to as Pueblo I sites that date from A.D. 700 to 900. Pueblo Bonito was built and occupied during later Pueblo II and III, a period of time lasting from approximately A.D. 900 to 1200. Robert S. Peabody’s collection became the basis for the Robert S. Peabody Museum of Archaeology at its founding in 1901. Peabody hired Moorehead to excavate Chaco Canyon and Mesa Verde. The items Moorehead collected were added to Peabody’s already existing collection. The oral tradition evidence describes dynamic population movements from Mesa Verde around A.D. 1300. It also describes migration and trade routes at the time of occupation. The archeological literature refers to this widespread cultural tradition as ‘‘Anasazi,’’ ‘‘Ancestral Puebloan,’’ or ‘‘Ancient Puebloan.’’ After approximately A.D. 1300, climatic changes evidently caused the populations to leave the Four Corners region, and resettle in Pueblos along the Rio Grande and in the Pueblos of Acoma, Zuni, and Hopi. Pueblo oral tradition places Chaco Canyon, including Pueblo Bonito, on migration routes. Songs and stories include Chaco as a place of occupation, trade, and migration. Based on scientific evidence, the establishment of trading networks with neighboring areas during the preliminary stages of Pueblo II at Pueblo Bonito is indicated by decorated ceramics from sources to the south and corrugated utility wares that originated to the west (Cordell 1979:149). These relationships expanded during Pueblo III and resulted in a cultural florescence typified by the construction of great kivas, a system of trails and roads VerDate Aug<31>2005 17:35 Dec 03, 2008 Jkt 217001 connecting the site to a network of others, and a complex irrigation system. Diagnostic ceramics in the museum’s Moorehead collection are Pueblo II and III types tentatively identified as Red Mesa Black-on-white (A.D. 875–1000), Gallup Black-on-white (A.D. 1000– 1100), Chaco Black-on-white (A.D. 1075–1130), and Mesa Verde Black-onwhite (A.D. 1140–1225). After about A.D. 1200, the entire Chaco area, including Pueblo Bonito, went into a decline that roughly corresponds to population growth occurring in regions to the east and south. Continuities in architecture, ceramics, agricultural practices, foodprocessing technology, and rituals from Chaco Canyon’s prehistoric settlements to the present-day Pueblos and Hopi Tribe bolster claims of cultural affiliation by these communities. Anthropological research corroborated during consultation indicates that many Puebloan peoples have additional bases for claiming cultural affiliation with the ancient residents of Chaco Canyon due to clan migrations, intermarriage, and the regrouping of communities over time. Navajo Nation oral history, which includes stories, songs and prayers, supports a relationship with Mesa Verde and Chaco Canyon, but there is not a preponderance of evidence to support a relationship of shared group identity to the human remains described in this notice. Based on oral history, architecture, archeological, anthropological, consultation evidence, and scientific evidence, a relationship of shared group identity can be reasonably traced between the human remains from Mesa Verde, Pueblo Bonito, and the ‘‘Graveyard’’ near Chaco group and the Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Ohkay Owingeh, New Mexico; Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; Pueblo of Cochiti, New Mexico; Pueblo of Isleta, New Mexico; Pueblo of Jemez, New Mexico; Pueblo of Laguna, New Mexico; Pueblo of Nambe, New Mexico; Pueblo of Picuris, New Mexico; Pueblo of Pojoaque, New Mexico; Pueblo of San Felipe, New Mexico; Pueblo of San Ildefonso, New Mexico; Pueblo of Sandia, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Ana, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Clara, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santo Domingo, New Mexico; Pueblo of Taos, New Mexico; Pueblo of Tesuque, New Mexico; Pueblo of Zia, New Mexico; Ysleta del Sur Pueblo of Texas; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico. Officials of the Robert S. Peabody Museum of Archaeology have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9–10), the human remains PO 00000 Frm 00053 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 73953 described above represent the physical remains of five individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of the Robert S. Peabody Museum of Archaeology also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(A), the seven objects described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials of the Robert S. Peabody Museum of Archaeology also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and the Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Ohkay Owingeh, New Mexico; Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; Pueblo of Cochiti, New Mexico; Pueblo of Isleta, New Mexico; Pueblo of Jemez, New Mexico; Pueblo of Laguna, New Mexico; Pueblo of Nambe, New Mexico; Pueblo of Picuris, New Mexico; Pueblo of Pojoaque, New Mexico; Pueblo of San Felipe, New Mexico; Pueblo of San Ildefonso, New Mexico; Pueblo of Sandia, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Ana, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Clara, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santo Domingo, New Mexico; Pueblo of Taos, New Mexico; Pueblo of Tesuque, New Mexico; Pueblo of Zia, New Mexico; Ysleta del Sur Pueblo of Texas; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary objects should contact Malinda Blustain, Director, Robert S. Peabody Museum of Archaeology, Phillips Academy, 175 Main Street, Andover, MA 01810, telephone (978) 749–4493, before January 5, 2009. Repatriation of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Ohkay Owingeh, New Mexico; Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; Pueblo of Cochiti, New Mexico; Pueblo of Isleta, New Mexico; Pueblo of Jemez, New Mexico; Pueblo of Laguna, New Mexico; Pueblo of Nambe, New Mexico; Pueblo of Picuris, New Mexico; Pueblo of Pojoaque, New Mexico; Pueblo of San Felipe, New Mexico; Pueblo of San Ildefonso, New Mexico; Pueblo of Sandia, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Ana, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Clara, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santo Domingo, New Mexico; Pueblo of Taos, New Mexico; Pueblo of Tesuque, New Mexico; Pueblo of Zia, New Mexico; Ysleta del Sur Pueblo of Texas; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New E:\FR\FM\04DEN1.SGM 04DEN1 73954 Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 234 / Thursday, December 4, 2008 / Notices Mexico may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The Robert S. Peabody Museum of Archaeology is responsible for notifying the Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Navajo Nation, Arizona, New Mexico & Utah; Ohkay Owingeh, New Mexico; Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; Pueblo of Cochiti, New Mexico; Pueblo of Isleta, New Mexico; Pueblo of Jemez, New Mexico; Pueblo of Laguna, New Mexico; Pueblo of Nambe, New Mexico; Pueblo of Picuris, New Mexico; Pueblo of Pojoaque, New Mexico; Pueblo of San Felipe, New Mexico; Pueblo of San Ildefonso, New Mexico; Pueblo of Sandia, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Ana, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Clara, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santo Domingo, New Mexico; Pueblo of Taos, New Mexico; Pueblo of Tesuque, New Mexico; Pueblo of Zia, New Mexico; Ysleta del Sur Pueblo of Texas; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, New Mexico that this notice has been published. Dated: November 6, 2008 Sherry Hutt. Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. E8–28696 Filed 12–3–08; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Michigan Department of Natural Resources, Mackinac State Historic Parks, Mackinaw City, MI National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: mstockstill on PROD1PC66 with NOTICES ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects in the possession of Michigan Department of Natural Resources, Mackinac State Historic Parks, Mackinaw City, MI. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from Emmet and Mackinac Counties, MI. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. VerDate Aug<31>2005 17:35 Dec 03, 2008 Jkt 217001 A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Mackinac State Historic Parks professional staff in consultation with representatives from the Bay Mills Indian Community, Michigan; Grand Traverse Bay Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians, Michigan; Little Traverse Bay Band of Odawa, Michigan; Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Michigan; and the Michigan Anishnaabek Cultural Preservation and Repatriation Alliance (MACPRA), a non-Federally recognized Indian group. In 1966, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were excavated from Fort Michilimackinac, Mackinaw City in Emmet County, MI, by Dr. Lyle Stone, archeologist, during excavations to locate Fort Michilimackinac. The human remains were placed into the parks’ collection at that time (Accn. ι MS2.3438). No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1973, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were excavated from the Fort Michilimackinac suburbs, Mackinaw City in Emmet County, MI, by W.L. Minnerly, archeologist, during excavations in preparation for construction done by the state park. The human remains were placed into the parks’collection at that time (Accn. ι F.533). No known individual was identified. The 15 associated funerary objects are 12 white seed beads, 2 glass French trade beads, and 1 kaolin pipestem fragment. In 1981, human remains representing a minimum of five individuals were recovered from Arch Rock on Mackinac Island in Mackinac County, MI, by a park visitor who notified the state park. Dr. Roger Grange, archeologist, investigated and determined that the location was a Native American rockshelter burial. The human remains were placed into the parks’ collection at that time. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. In 1994, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were excavated at the Island House Hotel on Mackinac Island in Mackinac County, MI, by Richard Clute, contractual archeologist, during excavations to construct a hotel pool. The human remains were transferred to the park and were placed into the collection. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. The area of Emmet and Mackinac Counties, encompassing the Straits of Mackinac, are situated at the top of Michigan’s lower peninsula (Emmet County) and lower southeast corner of PO 00000 Frm 00054 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 Michigan’s upper peninsula (Mackinac County). Within the boundaries of Mackinac County, Mackinac Island is situated in northern Lake Huron. This area has a long established history of Native American occupation before European encroachment in the early 17th century. The Anishnaabek, which is comprised of the Odawa/Ottawa, Ojibwe/Chippewa and Potawatomi, have long called this area home. Officials of the Mackinac State Historic Parks have reasonably determined that the individuals described above from Emmet and Mackinac Counties are Native American, however, officials of the Mackinac State Historic Parks have determined that the evidence is insufficient to determine cultural affiliation to any present-day Indian tribe. Officials of the Mackinac State Historic Parks have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9–10), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of eight individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of the Mackinac State Historic Parks also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(A), the 15 objects described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials of the Mackinac State Historic Parks have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), a relationship of shared group identity cannot be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and any present-day Indian tribe. The Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Review Committee (Review Committee) is responsible for recommending specific actions for disposition of culturally unidentifiable human remains. In May 2008, Mackinac State Historic Parks requested that the Review Committee recommend disposition of eight culturally unidentifiable human remains to the Bay Mills Indian Community, Michigan; Little Traverse Bay Band of Odawa, Michigan; and Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Michigan, as the aboriginal occupants of the lands encompassing the present-day Emmet and Mackinac Counties, MI. The Review Committee considered the proposal at its May 15–16, 2008 meeting and recommended disposition of the human remains to the Bay Mills Indian Community, Michigan; Little Traverse Bay Band of Odawa, Michigan; and Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Michigan. A July 18, 2008 E:\FR\FM\04DEN1.SGM 04DEN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 73, Number 234 (Thursday, December 4, 2008)]
[Notices]
[Pages 73952-73954]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: E8-28696]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service


Notice of Inventory Completion: Robert S. Peabody Museum of 
Archaeology, Phillips Academy, Andover, MA

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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    Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves 
Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the 
completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary 
objects in the possession of the Robert S. Peabody Museum of 
Archaeology, Phillips Academy, Andover, MA. The human remains and 
associated funerary objects were removed from Montezuma County, CO, and 
San Juan County, NM.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). 
The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National 
Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Robert S. 
Peabody Museum of Archaeology professional staff in consultation with 
representatives of the Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Navajo Nation, Arizona, 
New Mexico & Utah; Ohkay Owingeh, New Mexico (formerly the Pueblo of 
San Juan); Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; Pueblo of Cochiti, New Mexico; 
Pueblo of Isleta, New Mexico; Pueblo of Jemez, New Mexico; Pueblo of 
Laguna, New Mexico; Pueblo of Nambe, New Mexico; Pueblo of Picuris, New 
Mexico; Pueblo of Pojoaque, New Mexico; Pueblo of San Felipe, New 
Mexico; Pueblo of San Ildefonso, New Mexico; Pueblo of Sandia, New 
Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Ana, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Clara, New 
Mexico; Pueblo of Santo Domingo, New Mexico; Pueblo of Taos, New 
Mexico; Pueblo of Tesuque, New Mexico; Pueblo of Zia, New Mexico; 
Ysleta del Sur Pueblo of Texas; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, 
New Mexico.
    In 1898, human remains representing a minimum of one individual 
were removed from ``cliff house,'' Mesa Verde, Montezuma, CO, by Warren 
King Moorehead for Robert S. Peabody. No known individual was 
identified. The one associated funerary object is the cotton cloth in 
which the mummified infant is wrapped.
    ``Cliff house'' may be Cliff Palace or it may be one of several 
unidentifiable structures excavated by Moorehead. Occupation dates for 
Mesa Verde are A.D. 600 to A.D. 1300. Based on Moorehead's description 
and the cotton wrapping, the human remains fall within these dates. The 
Mesa Verde area was the center of important cultural developments 
archeologically classified as Pueblo I-III periods, during which people 
established aggregated agricultural villages with distinctive 
architecture, ceramics, and ceremonial practices.
    In 1897, human remains representing a minimum of one individual 
were removed from Pueblo Bonito, Chaco Group, San Juan County, NM, by 
Warren King Moorehead for Robert S. Peabody. No known individual was 
identified. The one associated funerary object is a reed mat.
    In 1897, human remains representing a minimum of two individuals 
were removed from Pueblo Bonito, Chaco Group, San Juan County, NM, by 
Warren King Moorehead for Robert S. Peabody. No known individuals were 
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    In 1897, five associated funerary objects were removed from Pueblo 
Bonito, Chaco Group, San Juan County, NM, by Warren King Moorehead for 
Robert S. Peabody. The human remains are held by the Peabody Museum of 
Archaeology and Ethnology at Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, which 
is a separate institution from the Robert S. Peabody Museum of 
Archaeology. The five associated funerary objects are one wood mat, one 
feathered robe, and three ceramic pitchers.
    Pueblo Bonito is the largest and most famous site in Chaco Canyon, 
and among the most well documented of the 12 Ancestral Puebloan ``great 
houses'' located there. As an architectural type, it shares with the 
others multiple stories, core-and-veneer masonry

[[Page 73953]]

construction, and larger rooms and subterranean kivas than found in 
preceding periods. Pueblo Bonito's planned D-shaped structure was five 
stories high along its back wall and may have had 800 rooms. It was 
built in three major episodes beginning around A.D. 919 and ending 
about A.D. 1140. At its peak in the late 10th century as many as 600 
rooms may have been in use.
    In 1897, human remains representing a minimum of one individual 
were removed from a ``Graveyard'' near Chaco Group, San Juan County, 
NM, by Warren King Moorehead for Robert S. Peabody. No known individual 
was identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    This site is a small ``cemetery'' about a mile from Pueblo Bonito. 
Archeological evidence indicates that Puebloan people were in Chaco 
Canyon since at least the Basketmaker period (circa A.D. 1). A survey 
of the Chaco area has identified what archeologists refer to as Pueblo 
I sites that date from A.D. 700 to 900. Pueblo Bonito was built and 
occupied during later Pueblo II and III, a period of time lasting from 
approximately A.D. 900 to 1200.
    Robert S. Peabody's collection became the basis for the Robert S. 
Peabody Museum of Archaeology at its founding in 1901. Peabody hired 
Moorehead to excavate Chaco Canyon and Mesa Verde. The items Moorehead 
collected were added to Peabody's already existing collection. The oral 
tradition evidence describes dynamic population movements from Mesa 
Verde around A.D. 1300. It also describes migration and trade routes at 
the time of occupation. The archeological literature refers to this 
widespread cultural tradition as ``Anasazi,'' ``Ancestral Puebloan,'' 
or ``Ancient Puebloan.'' After approximately A.D. 1300, climatic 
changes evidently caused the populations to leave the Four Corners 
region, and resettle in Pueblos along the Rio Grande and in the Pueblos 
of Acoma, Zuni, and Hopi. Pueblo oral tradition places Chaco Canyon, 
including Pueblo Bonito, on migration routes. Songs and stories include 
Chaco as a place of occupation, trade, and migration. Based on 
scientific evidence, the establishment of trading networks with 
neighboring areas during the preliminary stages of Pueblo II at Pueblo 
Bonito is indicated by decorated ceramics from sources to the south and 
corrugated utility wares that originated to the west (Cordell 
1979:149). These relationships expanded during Pueblo III and resulted 
in a cultural florescence typified by the construction of great kivas, 
a system of trails and roads connecting the site to a network of 
others, and a complex irrigation system. Diagnostic ceramics in the 
museum's Moorehead collection are Pueblo II and III types tentatively 
identified as Red Mesa Black-on-white (A.D. 875-1000), Gallup Black-on-
white (A.D. 1000-1100), Chaco Black-on-white (A.D. 1075-1130), and Mesa 
Verde Black-on-white (A.D. 1140-1225).
    After about A.D. 1200, the entire Chaco area, including Pueblo 
Bonito, went into a decline that roughly corresponds to population 
growth occurring in regions to the east and south. Continuities in 
architecture, ceramics, agricultural practices, food-processing 
technology, and rituals from Chaco Canyon's prehistoric settlements to 
the present-day Pueblos and Hopi Tribe bolster claims of cultural 
affiliation by these communities. Anthropological research corroborated 
during consultation indicates that many Puebloan peoples have 
additional bases for claiming cultural affiliation with the ancient 
residents of Chaco Canyon due to clan migrations, intermarriage, and 
the regrouping of communities over time.
    Navajo Nation oral history, which includes stories, songs and 
prayers, supports a relationship with Mesa Verde and Chaco Canyon, but 
there is not a preponderance of evidence to support a relationship of 
shared group identity to the human remains described in this notice.
    Based on oral history, architecture, archeological, 
anthropological, consultation evidence, and scientific evidence, a 
relationship of shared group identity can be reasonably traced between 
the human remains from Mesa Verde, Pueblo Bonito, and the ``Graveyard'' 
near Chaco group and the Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Ohkay Owingeh, New 
Mexico; Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; Pueblo of Cochiti, New Mexico; 
Pueblo of Isleta, New Mexico; Pueblo of Jemez, New Mexico; Pueblo of 
Laguna, New Mexico; Pueblo of Nambe, New Mexico; Pueblo of Picuris, New 
Mexico; Pueblo of Pojoaque, New Mexico; Pueblo of San Felipe, New 
Mexico; Pueblo of San Ildefonso, New Mexico; Pueblo of Sandia, New 
Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Ana, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Clara, New 
Mexico; Pueblo of Santo Domingo, New Mexico; Pueblo of Taos, New 
Mexico; Pueblo of Tesuque, New Mexico; Pueblo of Zia, New Mexico; 
Ysleta del Sur Pueblo of Texas; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, 
New Mexico.
    Officials of the Robert S. Peabody Museum of Archaeology have 
determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9-10), the human remains 
described above represent the physical remains of five individuals of 
Native American ancestry. Officials of the Robert S. Peabody Museum of 
Archaeology also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 
(3)(A), the seven objects described above are reasonably believed to 
have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of 
death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials 
of the Robert S. Peabody Museum of Archaeology also have determined 
that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared 
group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native 
American human remains and the Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Ohkay Owingeh, 
New Mexico; Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; Pueblo of Cochiti, New Mexico; 
Pueblo of Isleta, New Mexico; Pueblo of Jemez, New Mexico; Pueblo of 
Laguna, New Mexico; Pueblo of Nambe, New Mexico; Pueblo of Picuris, New 
Mexico; Pueblo of Pojoaque, New Mexico; Pueblo of San Felipe, New 
Mexico; Pueblo of San Ildefonso, New Mexico; Pueblo of Sandia, New 
Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Ana, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Clara, New 
Mexico; Pueblo of Santo Domingo, New Mexico; Pueblo of Taos, New 
Mexico; Pueblo of Tesuque, New Mexico; Pueblo of Zia, New Mexico; 
Ysleta del Sur Pueblo of Texas; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, 
New Mexico.
    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary 
objects should contact Malinda Blustain, Director, Robert S. Peabody 
Museum of Archaeology, Phillips Academy, 175 Main Street, Andover, MA 
01810, telephone (978) 749-4493, before January 5, 2009. Repatriation 
of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Hopi Tribe 
of Arizona; Ohkay Owingeh, New Mexico; Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; 
Pueblo of Cochiti, New Mexico; Pueblo of Isleta, New Mexico; Pueblo of 
Jemez, New Mexico; Pueblo of Laguna, New Mexico; Pueblo of Nambe, New 
Mexico; Pueblo of Picuris, New Mexico; Pueblo of Pojoaque, New Mexico; 
Pueblo of San Felipe, New Mexico; Pueblo of San Ildefonso, New Mexico; 
Pueblo of Sandia, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Ana, New Mexico; Pueblo 
of Santa Clara, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santo Domingo, New Mexico; Pueblo 
of Taos, New Mexico; Pueblo of Tesuque, New Mexico; Pueblo of Zia, New 
Mexico; Ysleta del Sur Pueblo of Texas; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni 
Reservation, New

[[Page 73954]]

Mexico may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come 
forward.
    The Robert S. Peabody Museum of Archaeology is responsible for 
notifying the Hopi Tribe of Arizona; Navajo Nation, Arizona, New Mexico 
& Utah; Ohkay Owingeh, New Mexico; Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico; Pueblo 
of Cochiti, New Mexico; Pueblo of Isleta, New Mexico; Pueblo of Jemez, 
New Mexico; Pueblo of Laguna, New Mexico; Pueblo of Nambe, New Mexico; 
Pueblo of Picuris, New Mexico; Pueblo of Pojoaque, New Mexico; Pueblo 
of San Felipe, New Mexico; Pueblo of San Ildefonso, New Mexico; Pueblo 
of Sandia, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa Ana, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santa 
Clara, New Mexico; Pueblo of Santo Domingo, New Mexico; Pueblo of Taos, 
New Mexico; Pueblo of Tesuque, New Mexico; Pueblo of Zia, New Mexico; 
Ysleta del Sur Pueblo of Texas; and Zuni Tribe of the Zuni Reservation, 
New Mexico that this notice has been published.

    Dated: November 6, 2008
Sherry Hutt.
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. E8-28696 Filed 12-3-08; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-S