Notice of Inventory Completion: Anchorage Museum at Rasmuson Center, Anchorage, AK, 71675-71676 [E8-28003]

Download as PDF jlentini on PROD1PC65 with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 228 / Tuesday, November 25, 2008 / Notices responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde Community of Oregon and Confederated Tribes of the Siletz Reservation, Oregon. In 1951, human remains representing a minimum of eight individuals were removed from an undetermined location in Benton County, OR, by the Army Corps of Engineers during construction of a levee near the Willamette River. The location, referred to as ‘‘Fir Grove,’’ was situated somewhere between Albany and Corvallis, OR. Following their removal from the area, the human remains were transferred to the University of Oregon for preservation. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Museum accession notes indicate that stone tools and cultural objects were found in association with the human remains, but none of the cultural items were transferred to the University of Oregon Museum. Based on distinctive osteological evidence and the documented association of the human remains with the observed artifacts, the individuals have been determined to be Native American. Ethnographic records suggest the area between present-day Albany and Corvallis, OR, was occupied by Kalapuya bands during the early Contact Period. The human remains described above are believed to have been removed from an area within or near the traditional lands of the Kalapuyan peoples whose descendants are members of the present-day Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde Community of Oregon and Confederated Tribes of the Siletz Reservation, Oregon. The Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde Community of Oregon include at least 26 tribes and bands whose ancestral homelands span western Oregon, southwestern Washington and northern California. The Grand Ronde tribes and bands include the Rogue River, Umpqua, Chasta, Kalapuya, Molala, Clackamas, Salmon River, Tillamook, and Nestucca, as well as other, smaller groups. At the time of contact, the individual groups spoke 30 VerDate Aug<31>2005 17:01 Nov 24, 2008 Jkt 217001 dialects of the Athapascan, Chinookan, Kalapuyan, Takelman, Molalan, Sahaptin, Salishan, and Shastan language families. In 1856–1857, the U.S. Government forcibly relocated the Grand Ronde peoples to the Grand Ronde Reservation, located at the headwaters of the South Yamhill River in Yamhill and Polk Counties, OR. The Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde Community of Oregon were first incorporated in 1935, terminated from Federal recognition in 1954, and restored to recognized status in 1983. The Confederated Tribes of the Siletz Reservation, Oregon, are a confederation of 30 bands whose ancestral territory ranged along the entire Oregon coast and Coast Range, inland to the main divide of the Cascade Range and southward to the Rogue River watershed. The principal tribes include the Clatsop, Chinook, Klickitat, Molala, Kalapuya, Tillamook, Alsea, Siuslaw/ Lower Umpqua, Coos, Coquille, Upper Umpqua, Tututni, Chetco, Tolowa, Takelma or Upper Rogue River, Galice/ Applegate, and Shasta. The ancestors of the Confederated Tribes of the Siletz Reservation spoke at least 10 different base languages, many of which had strong dialectic divisions even within the same language. In general, five linguistic stocks – Salish, Yakonan, Kusan, Takelman, and Athapascan – are represented by the tribes. The tribes were forcibly removed from their homelands in 1855 by the U.S. Government and placed on the Siletz and Grand Ronde reservations. After having their tribal status terminated from Federal recognition in 1954, the Confederated Tribes of the Siletz Reservation, Oregon were officially restored to recognized status in 1977. Officials of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9–10), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of at least eight individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District have also determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and the Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde Community of Oregon and/or Confederated Tribes of the Siletz Reservation, Oregon. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Daniel Mulligan, NAGPRA Coordinator, Environmental Resources Branch, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, P.O. Box PO 00000 Frm 00076 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 71675 2946, Portland, OR 97208–2946, telephone (503) 808–4768, before December 26, 2008. Repatriation of the human remains to the Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde Community of Oregon and/or Confederated Tribes of the Siletz Reservation, Oregon, may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District is responsible for notifying the Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde Community of Oregon and Confederated Tribes of the Siletz Reservation, Oregon that this notice has been published. Dated: October 30, 2008 Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. E8–28005 Filed 11–24–08; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Anchorage Museum at Rasmuson Center, Anchorage, AK National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains in the possession of the Anchorage Museum at Rasmuson Center, Anchorage, AK. The human remains were removed from near Point Hope and Point Barrow, AK. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Anchorage Museum at Rasmuson Center professional staff. Consultations with representatives from the Village of Anaktuvuk Pass; Arctic Slope Regional Corporation; Atqasuk Village (Atkasook); Native Village of Barrow Inupiat Traditional Government; Kaktovik Village; Native Village of Nuiqsut; Native Village of Point Hope; Native Village of Point Lay; and Village of Wainwright have yet to occur. On an unknown date, human remains representing a minimum of two E:\FR\FM\25NON1.SGM 25NON1 jlentini on PROD1PC65 with NOTICES 71676 Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 228 / Tuesday, November 25, 2008 / Notices individuals were removed from areas in or around Point Hope and Point Barrow, AK, by Colonel M.R. ‘‘Muktuk’’ Marston of Anchorage, AK. In 1955, Col. Marston donated the human remains to the Cook Inlet Historical Society. In 1968, the Cook Inlet Historical Society donated their collection to the Anchorage Museum at Rasmuson Center. In 2008, the ownership of the Cook Inlet Historical Society collection was transferred to the Municipality of Anchorage and placed into the custody of the Anchorage Museum Association, governing body of the Anchorage Museum at Rasmuson Center. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Col. Marston collected Native American human remains and objects over a 15 year period in northern Alaska. Based on the donor’s history and general provenience of removal, the human remains are reasonably determined to be of Native American descent and closely related to the Inupiaq people. Specifically, the human remains are from an area traditionally used by the descendants of the Inupiaq that are members of the Village of Anaktuvuk Pass; Arctic Slope Regional Corporation; Atqasuk Village (Atkasook); Native Village of Barrow Inupiat Traditional Government; Kaktovik Village; Native Village of Nuiqsut; Native Village of Point Hope; Native Village of Point Lay; and Village of Wainwright. Officials of the Anchorage Museum at Rasmuson Center have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9–10), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of two individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of the Anchorage Museum at Rasmuson Center also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and Village of Anaktuvuk Pass; Arctic Slope Regional Corporation; Atqasuk Village (Atkasook); Native Village of Barrow Inupiat Traditional Government; Kaktovik Village; Native Village of Nuiqsut; Native Village of Point Hope; Native Village of Point Lay; and Village of Wainwright. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Darian LaTocha, Collections Manager, Anchorage Museum at Rasmuson Center, 121 West 7th Avenue, Anchorage, AK 99501, telephone (907) 343–6197, before December 26, 2008. Repatriation of the human remains to the Village of VerDate Aug<31>2005 17:01 Nov 24, 2008 Jkt 217001 Anaktuvuk Pass; Arctic Slope Regional Corporation; Atqasuk Village (Atkasook); Native Village of Barrow Inupiat Traditional Government; Kaktovik Village; Native Village of Nuiqsut; Native Village of Point Hope; Native Village of Point Lay; and Village of Wainwright may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The Anchorage Museum at Rasmuson Center is responsible for notifying the Village of Anaktuvuk Pass; Arctic Slope Regional Corporation; Atqasuk Village (Atkasook); Native Village of Barrow Inupiat Traditional Government; Kaktovik Village; Native Village of Nuiqsut; Native Village of Point Hope; Native Village of Point Lay; and Village of Wainwright that this notice has been published. Dated: October 23, 2008 Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. E8–28003 Filed 11–24–08; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Anchorage Museum at Rasmuson Center, Anchorage, AK National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains in the possession of Anchorage Museum at Rasmuson Center, Anchorage, AK. The human remains were removed from a site approximately 80 miles from Kodiak, AK. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Anchorage Museum at Rasmuson Center professional staff. Consultations with representatives from the AkhiokKaguyak, Inc.; Ayakulik, Inc.; Kaguyak Village; Koniag, Inc.; Native Village of Akhiok; Native Village of Larsen Bay; and Uyak, Incorporated have yet to occur. PO 00000 Frm 00077 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 At an unknown date, human remains representing a minimum of one individual were removed from ‘‘about eighty miles from Kodiak, near Amik Bay’’ in Kodiak Island, AK, by Kathy Whitman of Anchorage. On May 4, 1971, Ms. Whitman donated the human remains to the Anchorage Museum. Sometime after it was collected, masking tape was used to stabilize the lower mandible. No known individual was identified. No associated funerary objects are present. The Anchorage Museum’s records report the human remains were found near ‘‘Amik Bay’’ in Kodiak. According to multiple references, Amik Bay is not recorded as a place name. However, there is an Amik Island at the mouth of Moser Bay, which is in Alitak Bay, and is approximately 80 miles from Kodiak. Although it is uncertain where the human remains were precisely collected and whether they were found without the means of conducting excavations, it is reasonably believed that the location is Alitak Bay and not ‘‘Amik Bay,’’ as stated in the museum accession records. Based on their age, the human remains are reasonably believed to be of Native American descent and closely related to the Alutiiq people. Specifically, the human remains are from an area traditionally used by the members of Akhiok-Kaguyak, Inc.; Native Village of Akhiok; Ayakulik, Inc.; Kaguyak Village; Koniag, Inc.; Native Village of Larsen Bay; and Uyak, Inc. Officials of the Anchorage Museum at Rasmuson Center have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9–10), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of one individual of Native American ancestry. Officials of the Anchorage Museum at Rasmuson Center also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and Akhiok-Kaguyak, Inc.; Native Village of Akhiok; Ayakulik, Inc.; Kaguyak Village; Koniag, Inc.; Native Village of Larsen Bay; and Uyak, Inc. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Darian LaTocha, Collections Manager, Anchorage Museum at Rasmuson Center, 121 West 7th Avenue, Anchorage, AK 99501, telephone (907) 343–6197, before December 26, 2008. Repatriation of the human remains to the Akhiok-Kaguyak, Inc.; Native Village of Akhiok; Ayakulik, Inc.; Kaguyak Village; Koniag, Inc.; Native Village of Larsen Bay; and Uyak, Inc. may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. E:\FR\FM\25NON1.SGM 25NON1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 73, Number 228 (Tuesday, November 25, 2008)]
[Notices]
[Pages 71675-71676]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: E8-28003]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service


Notice of Inventory Completion: Anchorage Museum at Rasmuson 
Center, Anchorage, AK

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

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    Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves 
Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the 
completion of an inventory of human remains in the possession of the 
Anchorage Museum at Rasmuson Center, Anchorage, AK. The human remains 
were removed from near Point Hope and Point Barrow, AK.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). 
The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains. The National Park Service is not responsible 
for the determinations in this notice.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the 
Anchorage Museum at Rasmuson Center professional staff. Consultations 
with representatives from the Village of Anaktuvuk Pass; Arctic Slope 
Regional Corporation; Atqasuk Village (Atkasook); Native Village of 
Barrow Inupiat Traditional Government; Kaktovik Village; Native Village 
of Nuiqsut; Native Village of Point Hope; Native Village of Point Lay; 
and Village of Wainwright have yet to occur.
    On an unknown date, human remains representing a minimum of two

[[Page 71676]]

individuals were removed from areas in or around Point Hope and Point 
Barrow, AK, by Colonel M.R. ``Muktuk'' Marston of Anchorage, AK. In 
1955, Col. Marston donated the human remains to the Cook Inlet 
Historical Society. In 1968, the Cook Inlet Historical Society donated 
their collection to the Anchorage Museum at Rasmuson Center. In 2008, 
the ownership of the Cook Inlet Historical Society collection was 
transferred to the Municipality of Anchorage and placed into the 
custody of the Anchorage Museum Association, governing body of the 
Anchorage Museum at Rasmuson Center. No known individuals were 
identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    Col. Marston collected Native American human remains and objects 
over a 15 year period in northern Alaska. Based on the donor's history 
and general provenience of removal, the human remains are reasonably 
determined to be of Native American descent and closely related to the 
Inupiaq people. Specifically, the human remains are from an area 
traditionally used by the descendants of the Inupiaq that are members 
of the Village of Anaktuvuk Pass; Arctic Slope Regional Corporation; 
Atqasuk Village (Atkasook); Native Village of Barrow Inupiat 
Traditional Government; Kaktovik Village; Native Village of Nuiqsut; 
Native Village of Point Hope; Native Village of Point Lay; and Village 
of Wainwright.
    Officials of the Anchorage Museum at Rasmuson Center have 
determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9-10), the human remains 
described above represent the physical remains of two individuals of 
Native American ancestry. Officials of the Anchorage Museum at Rasmuson 
Center also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there 
is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably 
traced between the Native American human remains and Village of 
Anaktuvuk Pass; Arctic Slope Regional Corporation; Atqasuk Village 
(Atkasook); Native Village of Barrow Inupiat Traditional Government; 
Kaktovik Village; Native Village of Nuiqsut; Native Village of Point 
Hope; Native Village of Point Lay; and Village of Wainwright.
    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Darian 
LaTocha, Collections Manager, Anchorage Museum at Rasmuson Center, 121 
West 7th Avenue, Anchorage, AK 99501, telephone (907) 343-6197, before 
December 26, 2008. Repatriation of the human remains to the Village of 
Anaktuvuk Pass; Arctic Slope Regional Corporation; Atqasuk Village 
(Atkasook); Native Village of Barrow Inupiat Traditional Government; 
Kaktovik Village; Native Village of Nuiqsut; Native Village of Point 
Hope; Native Village of Point Lay; and Village of Wainwright may 
proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward.
    The Anchorage Museum at Rasmuson Center is responsible for 
notifying the Village of Anaktuvuk Pass; Arctic Slope Regional 
Corporation; Atqasuk Village (Atkasook); Native Village of Barrow 
Inupiat Traditional Government; Kaktovik Village; Native Village of 
Nuiqsut; Native Village of Point Hope; Native Village of Point Lay; and 
Village of Wainwright that this notice has been published.

    Dated: October 23, 2008
Sherry Hutt,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. E8-28003 Filed 11-24-08; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-S