Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of Defense, Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, Portland, OR and University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History, Eugene, OR, 62531-62532 [E8-24967]

Download as PDF mstockstill on PROD1PC66 with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 204 / Tuesday, October 21, 2008 / Notices as a cemetery. Based on physical characteristics, osteological evidence, and the location of the human remains on the island, all five individuals have been determined to be Native American. Lower Memaloose Island is within the traditional territory of Chinookan- and Sahaptin-speaking groups represented by the present-day Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon and Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Washington. Per the 1855 Treaty with the Tribes of Middle Oregon, the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon signers were comprised of three Chinookanspeaking Wasco bands and four Sahaptin-speaking Warm Springs bands. The Uto-Aztecan-speaking Northern Paiutes, also part of the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon, joined the confederation in the 1870s. The Wasco and Warm Springs bands traditionally occupied the south shore of the Columbia River and its tributaries from Cascade Locks to just east of the present-day city of Arlington, OR. The 14 Sahaptin, Salish, and Chinookan-speaking tribes and bands of the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Washington, traditionally lived on the Washington side of the Columbia River between the eastern flanks of the Cascade Range and the lower reaches of the Yakima River drainage. Representatives of the Confederated Tribes of the Grande Ronde Community of Oregon, whose membership also includes Chinookan-speakers, have indicated that Lower Memaloose Island is outside of their pre-Contact territory. Officials of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9–10), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of five individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District also have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon and/or Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Washington. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains should contact Daniel Mulligan, NAGPRA Coordinator, Environmental Resources Branch, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, P.O. Box 2946, Portland, OR 97208–2946, telephone (503) 808–4768, before VerDate Aug<31>2005 17:06 Oct 20, 2008 Jkt 217001 November 20, 2008. Repatriation of the human remains to the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon and/or Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Washington may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District is responsible for notifying the Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde Community of Oregon, Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon, and Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Washington that this notice has been published. Dated: September 10, 2008. Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. E8–24966 Filed 10–20–08; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of Defense, Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, Portland, OR and University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History, Eugene, OR National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects for which the University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History, Eugene, OR, and U.S. Department of Defense, Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, Portland, OR, have joint responsibility. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from sites on Army Corps of Engineers land within the The Dalles Lock and Dam Project area, Wasco County, OR. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural PO 00000 Frm 00071 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 62531 History and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon and Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Washington. Native American cultural items described in this notice were excavated under Antiquities Act permits by the University of Oregon, Eugene, OR, on Army Corps of Engineers project lands. Following excavations at the sites described below, and under the provisions of the permits, the University of Oregon was allowed to retain the collections for preservation. In 1956, human remains representing a minimum of three individuals were removed from site 35–WS–1/WS–2, also known as the Big Eddy Site, Wasco County, OR, during excavations conducted by the University of Oregon prior to construction of The Dalles Dam. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Site 35–WS–1/WS–2 is located 5 miles east of the city of The Dalles, OR, on the south shore of the Columbia River. The site is described as a Wasco village and midden site dating from the Late Prehistoric through Historic periods. Based on the location of the human remains within the site, the individuals have been determined to be Native American. In 1954, human remains representing a minimum of eight individuals were removed from the Five Mile Rapids Site (35–WS–4), on the south shore of the Columbia River within The Dalles Lock and Dam Project area, Wasco County, OR, by the University of Oregon in conjunction with studies undertaken prior to the construction of The Dalles Dam. No known individuals were identified. The 515 associated funerary objects are 1 knife blade; 2 knives with wooden handles; 1 knife with a bone handle; 1 knife with a copper handle; 1 adze blade; 1 iron hatchet head; 1 projectile point fragment; 2 sturgeon hooks; 2 eyelets with springs; 2 composite harpoons; 1 fish scaler; 1 copper handle fragment; 10 decorated copper disks; 3 undecorated copper disks; 36 copper buttons; 1 phoenix button; 1 ring around a bear claw; 371 glass beads; 1 shell bead; 30 dentalium beads; 1 fragmentary copper tube bead; 3 stone beads; 1 bone bead; 1 lot of assorted beads, nails, and glass specimens; 1 reed fragment; 9 elk tooth ornaments; 7 complete and fragmentary dentalium shells; 3 carved bone fragments; 1 steatite cup; 1 steatite pipe; 1 Northwest Company token; 2 red E:\FR\FM\21OCN1.SGM 21OCN1 mstockstill on PROD1PC66 with NOTICES 62532 Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 204 / Tuesday, October 21, 2008 / Notices ochre specimens; 1 iron ore specimen; 4 mirror and glass fragments; 2 petrified wood pieces; 2 antler pieces; 1 container of wood, bone, iron, and lead pieces; 1 bag of cut bone and wood pieces; 1 bag of wood pieces; 1 lock of hair; 1 lot of fragmentary iron strips; and 1 lot of bark fragments. Site 35–WS–4, sometimes referred to as 35–WS–8 or The Dalles Roadcut Site, is located approximately 2 miles northeast of The Dalles Dam at what was once the headwaters of (the nowinundated) Five Mile Rapids. The Five Mile Rapids Site is described as a possible village site dating to between 11,000 B.P. and historic times. The site was last occupied in the 19th Century as a Tenino summer fishing village. Based on the associated funerary objects, the human remains have been determined to be Native American. In 1954, human remains representing a minimum of seven individuals were removed from site 35–WS–5, Wasco County, OR, during excavations conducted by the University of Oregon prior to construction of The Dalles Dam. Two additional individuals were removed at a later, unknown date, possibly during salvage operations in 1961. No known individuals were identified. No associated funerary objects are present. Site 35–WS–5 is located on the south shore of the Columbia River, approximately 2 miles east of The Dalles Dam. The site is described as a permanent village that was occupied prior to A.D. 1800. The site was inundated by Lake Celilo after the construction of The Dalles Lock and Dam. Based on osteological evidence and the location of the human remains within the site, the individuals have been determined to be Native American. The sites described above are within the traditional lands of the present-day Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon, which is composed of three Wasco bands, four Warm Springs bands and Northern Paiutes. The Columbia River-based Wasco were the easternmost group of Chinookan-speaking Indians. The Sahaptin-speaking Warm Springs bands lived farther east along the Columbia River and its tributaries. Northern Paiutes, who spoke a Uto-Aztecan language, historically occupied much of southeastern Oregon. The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon peoples also traditionally shared the site area with relatives and neighbors whose descendants may be culturally affiliated with the 14 Sahaptin, Salish and Chinookanspeaking tribes and bands of the present-day Confederated Tribes and VerDate Aug<31>2005 17:06 Oct 20, 2008 Jkt 217001 Bands of the Yakama Nation, Washington. Yakama homelands were traditionally located on the Washington side of the Columbia River between the eastern flanks of the Cascade Range and the lower reaches of the Yakima River drainage. Officials of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9–10), the human remains described above represent the physical remains of 20 individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District have also determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(A), the 515 objects described above are reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or ceremony. Lastly, officials of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably traced between the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects and the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon and/or Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Washington. Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary objects should contact Daniel Mulligan, NAGPRA Coordinator, Environmental Resources Branch, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, P.O. Box 2946, Portland, OR 97208–2946, telephone (503) 808–4768, before November 20, 2008. Repatriation of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon and/or Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Washington may proceed after that date if no additional claimants come forward. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District is responsible for notifying the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon and Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Washington that this notice has been published. Dated: September 10, 2008. Sherry Hutt, Manager, National NAGPRA Program. [FR Doc. E8–24967 Filed 10–20–08; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4312–50–S PO 00000 Frm 00072 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of Defense, Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, Portland, OR and University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History, Eugene, OR National Park Service, Interior. Notice. AGENCY: ACTION: Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects for which the University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History, Eugene, OR, and U.S. Department of Defense, Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, Portland, OR, have joint responsibility. The human remains and associated funerary objects were removed from a site on Army Corps of Engineers land within the John Day Dam project area, Klickitat County, WA. This notice is published as part of the National Park Service’s administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice. A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Washington; Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon; Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon; and Nez Perce Tribe of Idaho. Native American cultural items described in this notice were excavated under an Antiquities Act permit by the University of Oregon, Eugene, OR, on Army Corps of Engineers project land. Following excavations at the site described below, and under the provisions of the permits, the University of Oregon was allowed to retain the collections for preservation. In 1965, human remains representing a minimum of three individuals were removed from site 45–KL–5, also known as the Alderdale Site, Klickitat County, E:\FR\FM\21OCN1.SGM 21OCN1

Agencies

[Federal Register Volume 73, Number 204 (Tuesday, October 21, 2008)]
[Notices]
[Pages 62531-62532]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: E8-24967]


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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Park Service


Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of Defense, Army 
Corps of Engineers, Portland District, Portland, OR and University of 
Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History, Eugene, OR

AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

    Notice is here given in accordance with the Native American Graves 
Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), 25 U.S.C. 3003, of the 
completion of an inventory of human remains and associated funerary 
objects for which the University of Oregon Museum of Natural and 
Cultural History, Eugene, OR, and U.S. Department of Defense, Army 
Corps of Engineers, Portland District, Portland, OR, have joint 
responsibility. The human remains and associated funerary objects were 
removed from sites on Army Corps of Engineers land within the The 
Dalles Lock and Dam Project area, Wasco County, OR.
    This notice is published as part of the National Park Service's 
administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003 (d)(3). 
The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the 
museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native 
American human remains and associated funerary objects. The National 
Park Service is not responsible for the determinations in this notice.
    A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the 
University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History and U.S. 
Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District professional staff in 
consultation with representatives of the Confederated Tribes of the 
Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon and Confederated Tribes and Bands of 
the Yakama Nation, Washington.
    Native American cultural items described in this notice were 
excavated under Antiquities Act permits by the University of Oregon, 
Eugene, OR, on Army Corps of Engineers project lands. Following 
excavations at the sites described below, and under the provisions of 
the permits, the University of Oregon was allowed to retain the 
collections for preservation.
    In 1956, human remains representing a minimum of three individuals 
were removed from site 35-WS-1/WS-2, also known as the Big Eddy Site, 
Wasco County, OR, during excavations conducted by the University of 
Oregon prior to construction of The Dalles Dam. No known individuals 
were identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    Site 35-WS-1/WS-2 is located 5 miles east of the city of The 
Dalles, OR, on the south shore of the Columbia River. The site is 
described as a Wasco village and midden site dating from the Late 
Prehistoric through Historic periods. Based on the location of the 
human remains within the site, the individuals have been determined to 
be Native American.
    In 1954, human remains representing a minimum of eight individuals 
were removed from the Five Mile Rapids Site (35-WS-4), on the south 
shore of the Columbia River within The Dalles Lock and Dam Project 
area, Wasco County, OR, by the University of Oregon in conjunction with 
studies undertaken prior to the construction of The Dalles Dam. No 
known individuals were identified. The 515 associated funerary objects 
are 1 knife blade; 2 knives with wooden handles; 1 knife with a bone 
handle; 1 knife with a copper handle; 1 adze blade; 1 iron hatchet 
head; 1 projectile point fragment; 2 sturgeon hooks; 2 eyelets with 
springs; 2 composite harpoons; 1 fish scaler; 1 copper handle fragment; 
10 decorated copper disks; 3 undecorated copper disks; 36 copper 
buttons; 1 phoenix button; 1 ring around a bear claw; 371 glass beads; 
1 shell bead; 30 dentalium beads; 1 fragmentary copper tube bead; 3 
stone beads; 1 bone bead; 1 lot of assorted beads, nails, and glass 
specimens; 1 reed fragment; 9 elk tooth ornaments; 7 complete and 
fragmentary dentalium shells; 3 carved bone fragments; 1 steatite cup; 
1 steatite pipe; 1 Northwest Company token; 2 red

[[Page 62532]]

ochre specimens; 1 iron ore specimen; 4 mirror and glass fragments; 2 
petrified wood pieces; 2 antler pieces; 1 container of wood, bone, 
iron, and lead pieces; 1 bag of cut bone and wood pieces; 1 bag of wood 
pieces; 1 lock of hair; 1 lot of fragmentary iron strips; and 1 lot of 
bark fragments.
    Site 35-WS-4, sometimes referred to as 35-WS-8 or The Dalles 
Roadcut Site, is located approximately 2 miles northeast of The Dalles 
Dam at what was once the headwaters of (the now-inundated) Five Mile 
Rapids. The Five Mile Rapids Site is described as a possible village 
site dating to between 11,000 B.P. and historic times. The site was 
last occupied in the 19th Century as a Tenino summer fishing village. 
Based on the associated funerary objects, the human remains have been 
determined to be Native American.
    In 1954, human remains representing a minimum of seven individuals 
were removed from site 35-WS-5, Wasco County, OR, during excavations 
conducted by the University of Oregon prior to construction of The 
Dalles Dam. Two additional individuals were removed at a later, unknown 
date, possibly during salvage operations in 1961. No known individuals 
were identified. No associated funerary objects are present.
    Site 35-WS-5 is located on the south shore of the Columbia River, 
approximately 2 miles east of The Dalles Dam. The site is described as 
a permanent village that was occupied prior to A.D. 1800. The site was 
inundated by Lake Celilo after the construction of The Dalles Lock and 
Dam. Based on osteological evidence and the location of the human 
remains within the site, the individuals have been determined to be 
Native American.
    The sites described above are within the traditional lands of the 
present-day Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of 
Oregon, which is composed of three Wasco bands, four Warm Springs bands 
and Northern Paiutes. The Columbia River-based Wasco were the 
easternmost group of Chinookan-speaking Indians. The Sahaptin-speaking 
Warm Springs bands lived farther east along the Columbia River and its 
tributaries. Northern Paiutes, who spoke a Uto-Aztecan language, 
historically occupied much of southeastern Oregon. The Confederated 
Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon peoples also 
traditionally shared the site area with relatives and neighbors whose 
descendants may be culturally affiliated with the 14 Sahaptin, Salish 
and Chinookan-speaking tribes and bands of the present-day Confederated 
Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Washington. Yakama homelands 
were traditionally located on the Washington side of the Columbia River 
between the eastern flanks of the Cascade Range and the lower reaches 
of the Yakima River drainage.
    Officials of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District 
have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9-10), the human 
remains described above represent the physical remains of 20 
individuals of Native American ancestry. Officials of the U.S. Army 
Corps of Engineers, Portland District have also determined that, 
pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (3)(A), the 515 objects described above are 
reasonably believed to have been placed with or near individual human 
remains at the time of death or later as part of the death rite or 
ceremony. Lastly, officials of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 
Portland District have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (2), 
there is a relationship of shared group identity that can be reasonably 
traced between the Native American human remains and associated 
funerary objects and the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs 
Reservation of Oregon and/or Confederated Tribes and Bands of the 
Yakama Nation, Washington.
    Representatives of any other Indian tribe that believes itself to 
be culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary 
objects should contact Daniel Mulligan, NAGPRA Coordinator, 
Environmental Resources Branch, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland 
District, P.O. Box 2946, Portland, OR 97208-2946, telephone (503) 808-
4768, before November 20, 2008. Repatriation of the human remains and 
associated funerary objects to the Confederated Tribes of the Warm 
Springs Reservation of Oregon and/or Confederated Tribes and Bands of 
the Yakama Nation, Washington may proceed after that date if no 
additional claimants come forward.
    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District is responsible 
for notifying the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation 
of Oregon and Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, 
Washington that this notice has been published.

    Dated: September 10, 2008.
Sherry Hutt,
Manager, National NAGPRA Program.
[FR Doc. E8-24967 Filed 10-20-08; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4312-50-S